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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6324
Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 3.2-3.5


nanO Nereus, god of surging seas We praise thy daughter here Whom Peleus at the strong command Of love did make his dear. Thou art our lady Venus brave, In sea a glimpsing star: Who thee, Achilles, did bring forth A very Mars in war. A captain good unto the Greeks Thy glory scales the skies: To thee did thy red headed wife Cause Pyrrhus rough to rise, The Trojans' utter overthrow, But stay to Greekish host: Be thou, good Pyrrhus, unto us A favourable ghost. Who here in grave entombed liest In Phoebus' sacred ground, Bow down thy ear to the holy hymns That we to thee do sound. And this our city suffer not In any fear to be. Of thee and Thetis is our song — Thetis, all hail to thee.'


nan'This was the song made, Cnemon, as far as I remember. And there was so good order in the song, and the measure of their dancing agreed so well with the sound of the music, that men's eyes neglected what they saw in comparison with what they heard, and those that stood by followed the maids as they passed on, as though they had been constrained with the pleasantness of their song, until the jolly lusty youths with their captain and ringleader appeared, the sight whereof was better than all description. The whole number of these youths was fifty, which was divided into twice five and twenty, each party arrayed about their captain, who rode in the midst of them. Their boots wrought of purple leather were folded finely a little above their ankles. Their cloaks were white, fastened with buckles of gold before their breasts, with a border of blue around the nethermost hem. Their horses all came out of Thessaly, and by their pleasant countenances showed the good pasturage of their country. They foamed on their bits, as though they thought scorn of such as rode upon them, yet they turned very readily as the riders would have them. Their saddles and the rest of their harness was so beset with silver and gold that in this point the young men seemed to strive who should be bravest. But those who were present, Cnemon, did so despise and pass by these men thus apparelled, and look on the captain Theagenes, on whom was my care set, that all which showed before very bright was now darkened, as it had been by some passing lightning: such brightness did the sight of him bring to our eyes. He was on horse back in heavy armour, a spear of ash pointed with bronze in his hand, bare-headed without a helmet. His cloak was of purple wrought with gold, wherein was the battle of the Centaurs and the Lapiths; on the button of his cloak was Pallas pictured in electrum, bearing a shield before her breast whereon was Gorgon's head. The comeliness and commendation of all that he did was somewhat increased by the easy blowing of the wind, which moved his hair about his neck, and parted it upon his forehead, and made his cloak wave so that the nether parts thereof covered the back and buttocks of his horse. You would have said that his horse was moved by the beauty of his master and knew that he did bear upon him a passing seemly man: in so fine a sort did he rear his neck and with pricked up ears toss his head and roll his eyes fiercely and prance and leap from the ground. When he had the reins a little at his will, he would set forward courageously, and turn about on both sides and beat the ground with the tips of his hoofs lightly, and moderate his fierceness with the pleasantness of his pace. Each man was amazed thereat, and gave the young man the principal praise, as well for his courage, as for the beauty and comeliness of his person. As for the common sort of women and such as could not moderate their affections, they cast apples and flowers at him, by that means, as might be guessed, seeking to get his favour. For they were all of this opinion, that there could be no human shape which could surmount the seemliness of Theagenes.


nan'But when Aurora with rosial fingers, as Homer saith, appeared, and the beautiful and wise Chariclea came out of Diana's temple, then we perceived that Theagenes could be conquered, and so far conquered as the pure comeliness of woman's beauty hath more and greater force of attraction than the fairest man. She was carried in a chariot drawn by a yoke of white oxen, and had on a purple gown down to her feet, spangled with gold. She was girded with a girdle, in making whereof the workman bestowed all his craft, in that he never made the like before nor was able to frame such another after. He tied two dragon's tails behind her back between her shoulders, bringing further their contrary necks under her paps with an artificial knot, suffering both their heads to hang down after it was fastened about her. You would have said the serpents did not seem to creep but crept indeed. They were not fearful with their terrible looks, but seemed as though they had been wantonly asleep. As touching their matter, they were gold, but in colour blue-black. For the gold by art was darkened that black and gold mingled together might represent the roughness and diversity of the scales. Such was the maid's girdle. Her hair was neither all bound up nor all loose. The most part thereof that grew behind hung over her shoulders; that which grew from the crown of her head downward to her forehead, being fair in colour and like to roses, was crowned with a garland of young laurel, which did not suffer the whole to be blown more than was seemly by the vehemence of the wind. In her left hand she bore a gilded bow, and a quiver of arrows hung on her right shoulder, while in her left hand was a burning taper, and, though she was so attired, there came a brighter light from her eyes than from the taper.' 'These same are Theagenes and Chariclea indeed,' said Cnemon. Calasiris thinking he had spied them somewhere asked him: 'Where be they? Show me them for God's sake.' 'Methought, father,' said the other, 'I saw them, not being here; so well did you describe them even as I remember once to have seen.' 'I cannot tell,' quoth Calasiris, 'whether you saw them so attired as on that day all Greece and the sun himself did see them. So fair and so happy were they that every man desired her for wife and every woman him for husband. The union of the twain they counted like to an immortal thing; albeit the people of the country praised the young man more, and the Thessalians the maid, both marvelling especially at that which they had not seen before. For a new countenance and seldom seen doth more move the mind than one wherewith we are daily acquainted. But O delectable deceit, O acceptable opinion! How thou didst comfort me, Cnemon, when I hoped that you had seen my dear children and wouldest have shown them to me! But thou goest about utterly to deceive me. For you promised me at the first that they would come by and by, and as reward obtained from me this tale of them; but yet you cannot show me them now, although the evening approach and it be dark night.' 'Be content,' quoth he, 'and fear not: they will come without doubt. Perhaps there is some let and hinderance that they come not so soon as was appointed between us; but even if they were here, I would not show you them until I had the whole reward you promised me. Wherefore if you desire to see them in haste, perform what you promised and make an end of your unfinished tale.' 'I am very unwilling,' quoth the other, 'to do that which bringeth me in mind of that which grieveth me much; and I supposed too that you were weary of this my so long prattling. But since you are so desirous to hear and can never be wearied with a good tale, go to, let us proceed whence we left off. Yet first let us light a lamp and do sacrifice to the gods that govern in the night, that having performed the accustomed ceremonies we may lie here quietly and tell forward our tale.'


nanHe said this, and straightway a maid brought in a lighted lamp, and he finished his sacrifice, and called upon divers of the gods and especially on Mercury, and desired to have some happy dream that night, praying humbly that his dearly beloved children might appear unto him in his sleep. And when he had done all this, he went on with his tale thus — 'After the young men had gone three times around the tomb of Neoptolemus, the women cried out piteously and the men made a strange noise. Therewith suddenly all the oxen, rams, and goats were killed, as if they had been slain at one stroke. Last of all, when the altar, being of wonderful greatness, had very many cloven logs laid upon it, and all manners of lawful offerings were added thereto, they made request that Apollo's priest might begin the sacrifice and set fire to the altar. Charicles said that the sacrifice indeed appertained to him, but that the captain of the holy legation should take the torch from her that was president of these ceremonies and set the altar on fire: for so was the fashion of the country. This he said, and did sacrifice, and Theagenes took the torch. Surely, Cnemon, we may know by its deeds and workings that the mind is a heavenly thing and hath close affinity with the higher nature. For as soon as the young people saw each other, at the same moment they loved each other, as though the soul recognised its fellow and hastened towards its destined mate. At the first they stood still suddenly, as if in amaze. Then she slowly handed him the torch, and he likewise received it, viewing one another with steady eyes, as if either had seen or known the other before and was now trying to remember where. This done, they smiled a little, but secretly, so that it could hardly be perceived save by the softness of their glance. Afterwards, as though they were ashamed of what they did, they blushed; and then, within a while, when this affection, as I think, had gripped their hearts, they became pale. In a word, a thousand looks appeared on their faces in a short time, and the changing of all kind of colour and the rolling of their eyes plainly betokened the troubles in their mind. The people who were present, as may be guessed, perceived nothing of this, because every one was thinking of other matters; nor did Charicles, who at that time repeated the usual prayer. But I did nothing but mark the young couple, for I was moved to suspect what should come to pass by conjecture of their names, after what the oracle had said of Theagenes, when he was doing sacrifice in the temple. Yet I knew nothing exactly of what was signified in the latter part of the oracle.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 22.170-22.171 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

22.170. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.171. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel
2. Homer, Odyssey, 3.274 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Persians, 205-208, 204 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

204. θέλουσα θῦσαι πέλανον, ὧν τέλη τάδε.
4. Euripides, Electra, 171 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

171. ἀγγέλλει δ' ὅτι νῦν τριταί-
5. Herodotus, Histories, 2.81, 2.164, 8.122 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.81. They wear linen tunics with fringes hanging about the legs, called “calasiris,” and loose white woolen mantles over these. But nothing woolen is brought into temples, or buried with them: that is impious. ,They agree in this with practices called Orphic and Bacchic, but in fact Egyptian and Pythagorean: for it is impious, too, for one partaking of these rites to be buried in woolen wrappings. There is a sacred legend about this. 2.164. The Egyptians are divided into seven classes: priests, warriors, cowherds, swineherds, merchants, interpreters, and pilots. There are this many classes, each named after its occupation. ,The warriors are divided into Kalasiries and Hermotubies, and they belong to the following districts (for all divisions in Egypt are made according to districts). 8.122. Having sent the first-fruits to Delphi, the Greeks, in the name of the country generally, made inquiry of the god whether the first-fruits which he had received were of full measure and whether he was content. To this he said that he was content with what he had received from all other Greeks, but not from the Aeginetans. From these he demanded the victor's prize for the sea-fight of Salamis. When the Aeginetans learned that, they dedicated three golden stars which are set on a bronze mast, in the angle, nearest to Croesus' bowl.
6. Sophocles, Electra, 638-659, 637 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Xenophon, Hellenica, 5.4.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5.4.4. As for Phillidas, since the polemarchs always celebrate a festival of Aphrodite upon the expiration of their term of office, he was making all the arrangements for them, and in particular, having long ago promised to bring them women, and the most stately and beautiful women there were in Thebes, he said he would do so at that time. And they — for they were that sort of men — expected to spend the night very pleasantly.
8. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 7.2.4 (1st cent. CE

7.2.4. ζῶντι μὲν γάρ οἱ τὴν Ἰνδῶν γῆν ἐξαρκεῖν φέρουσαν τὰ ὡραῖα, ἀποθανόντα δὲ ἀπαλλαγήσεσθαι οὐκ ἐπιεικοῦς ξυνοίκου τοῦ σώματος. οὔκουν οὐδὲ Ἀλέξανδρον ἐπιχειρῆσαι βιάσασθαι γνόντα ἐλεύθερον ὄντα τὸν ἄνδρα, ἀλλὰ Κάλανον γὰρ ἀναπεισθῆναι τῶν ταύτῃ σοφιστῶν, ὅντινα μάλιστα δὴ αὑτοῦ ἀκράτορα Μεγασθένης ἀνέγραψεν αὐτοὺς τοὺς Megasth. fr. 43 σοφιστὰς λέγειν κακίζοντας τὸν Κάλανον, ὅτι ἀπολιπὼν τὴν παρὰ σφίσιν εὐδαιμονίαν ὁ δὲ δεσπότην ἄλλον ἢ τὸν θεὸν ἐθεράπευε. ταῦτα ἐγὼ ἀνέγραψα, ὅτι καὶ ὑπὲρ Καλάνου ἐχρῆν
9. Xenophon of Ephesus, The Ephesian Story of Anthica And Habrocomes, 1.3.1, 1.5.6-1.5.8, 2.13.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 1.1.2, 2.12.3, 2.15.2-2.15.3, 2.18.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Chariton, Chaereas And Callirhoe, 3.2.15, 3.7.7, 3.8.3, 6.2.4, 6.4.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

12. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 1.2.5, 2.20.2, 2.34-2.35, 3.3-3.5, 4.16.8, 5.15.3 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

13. Longus, Daphnis And Chloe, 3.10, 4.25 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.23.8-3.23.9, 10.14.5-10.14.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.23.8. About two stades to the right is the water of Ino, as it is called, in extent like a small lake, but going deeper into the earth. Into this water they throw cakes of barley meal at the festival of Ino. If good luck is portended to the thrower, the water keeps them under. But if it brings them to the surface, it is judged a bad sign. 3.23.9. The craters in Aetna have the same feature; for they lower into them objects of gold and silver and also all kinds of victims. If the fire receives and consumes them, they rejoice at the appearance of a good sign, but if it casts up what has been thrown in, they think misfortune will befall the man to whom this happens. 10.14.5. The Greeks who fought against the king, besides dedicating at Olympia a bronze Zeus, dedicated also an Apollo at Delphi, from spoils taken in the naval actions at Artemisium and Salamis . There is also a story that Themistocles came to Delphi bringing with him for Apollo some of the Persian spoils. He asked whether he should dedicate them within the temple, but the Pythian priestess bade him carry them from the sanctuary altogether. The part of the oracle referring to this runs as follows:— The splendid beauty of the Persian's spoils Set not within my temple. Despatch them home speedily. 10.14.6. Now I greatly marveled that it was from Themistocles alone that the priestess refused to accept Persian spoils. Some thought that the god would have rejected alike all offerings from Persian spoils, if like Themistocles the others had inquired of Apollo before making their dedication. Others said that the god knew that Themistocles would become a suppliant of the Persian king, and refused to take the gifts so that Themistocles might not by a dedication render the Persian's enmity unappeasable. The expedition of the barbarian against Greece we find foretold in the oracles of Bacis, and Euclus wrote his verses about it at an even earlier date.
15. Epigraphy, Rhodes & Osborne Ghi, 81



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
achilles tatius Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
aelian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
aeschylus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
alexander, of macedon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
apollo Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
aratus, in theoc. Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 7
argos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
arms Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
athena Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
atossa Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
babylon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
bithynia Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
burkert, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
calanus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
calasiris Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
calchas Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
cauldrons Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
charicleia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
chariton Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
darius Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
delphi Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
demaenete Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
detienne, m. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
epidaurus limera Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
etna, mount Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
euripides Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
female Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
fruit Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
growth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
helen Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
heliodorus, names in Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
heliodorus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141, 172
heraion, perachora Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
hermione Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
herodotus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
homer, iliad Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
homer Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
houses, miniature Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
hydaspes Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
india, indian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
initiation Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
isias, of chemmis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
isis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
kalathoi Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
loom weights Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
macedon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
menander Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
myrto, in theoc. Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 7
neoptolemus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
nestor Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
offerings Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
olympus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
oracle Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
perachora Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
persia, persian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
persians Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141, 172
petosiris Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
philip v Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
phoebus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
plutarch Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
polybius Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
pomegranate Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
priests, egyptian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
protomai Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
prusias Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
pylos Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
rhegium Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
rider Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
rites, initiation Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
robertson smith, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
sacrificial Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
samos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
ships, miniature Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
sickles Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
sisimithres Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
sophocles Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141
theagenes, of rhegium Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
theagenes Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
theano Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
thebes Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
thesaurus cultus et rituum antiquorum Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
thetis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
thracian Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
thucydides Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
thyamis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 469
tiryns Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
trojans Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
troy Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
vegetation Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 204
vernant, j.-p. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
xenophon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 172
xerxes' Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 141