Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6284
Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 36


nanthe chief of Magdiel, the chief of Iram. These are the chiefs of Edom, according to their habitations in the land of their possession. This is Esau the father of the Edomites.,And Bela died, and Jobab the son of Zerah of Bozrah reigned in his stead.,And these are the generations of Esau the father of a the Edomites in the mountain-land of Seir.,And Jobab died, and Husham of the land of the Temanites reigned in his stead.,These are the children of Dishan: Uz and Aran.,And these are the sons of Oholibamah Esau’s wife: the chief of Jeush, the chief of Jalam, the chief of Korah. These are the chiefs that came of Oholibamah the daughter of Anah, Esau’s wife.,the chief of Dishon, the chief of Ezer, the chief of Dishan. These are the chiefs that came of the Horites, according to their chiefs in the land of Seir.,For their substance was too great for them to dwell together; and the land of their sojournings could not bear them because of their cattle.,And these are the children of Dishon: Hemdan and Eshban and Ithran and Cheran.,And these are the children of Shobal: Alvan and Manahath and Ebal, Shepho and Onam.,And these are the children of Zibeon: Aiah and Anah—this is Anah who found the hot springs in the wilderness, as he fed the asses of Zibeon his father.,And the children of Lotan were Hori and Hemam; and Lotan’s sister was Timna.,and Dishon and Ezer and Dishan. These are the chiefs that came of the Horites, the children of Seir in the land of Edom.,These are the names of Esau’s sons: Eliphaz the son of Adah the wife of Esau, Reuel the son of Basemath the wife of Esau.,and Basemath Ishmael’s daughter, sister of Nebaioth.,and Oholibamah bore Jeush, and Jalam, and Korah. These are the sons of Esau, that were born unto him in the land of Canaan.,And the sons of Eliphaz were Teman, Omar, Zepho, and Gatam, and Kenaz.,And Hadad died, and Samlah of Masrekah reigned in his stead.,These are the sons of Esau, and these are their chiefs; the same is Edom.,And Esau took his wives, and his sons, and his daughters, and all the souls of his house, and his cattle, and all his beasts, and all his possessions, which he had gathered in the land of Canaan; and went into a land away from his brother Jacob.,These are the chiefs that came of the Horites: the chief of Lotan, the chief of Shobal, the chief of Zibeon, the chief of Anah,,And Adah bore to Esau Eliphaz; and Basemath bore Reuel;,Esau took his wives of the daughters of Canaan; Adah the daughter of Elon the Hittite, and Oholibamah the daughter of Anah, the daughter of Zibeon the Hivite,,And these are the children of Anah: Dishon and Oholibamah the daughter of Anah.,And Bela the son of Beor reigned in Edom; and the name of his city was Dinhabah.,These are the children of Ezer: Bilhan and Zaavan and Akan.,the chief of Kenaz, the chief of Teman, the chief of Mibzar;,And Husham died, and Hadad the son of Bedad, who smote Midian in the field of Moab, reigned in his stead; and the name of his city was Avith.,And Samlah died, and Shaul of Rehoboth by the River reigned in his stead.,And Shaul died, and Baal-hanan the son of Achbor reigned in his stead.,And Timna was concubine to Eliphaz Esau’s son; and she bore to Eliphaz Amalek. These are the sons of Adah Esau’s wife.,the chief of Korah, the chief of Gatam, the chief of Amalek. These are the chiefs that came of Eliphaz in the land of Edom. These are the sons of Adah.,These are the chiefs of the sons of Esau: the sons of Eliphaz the first-born of Esau: the chief of Teman, the chief of Omar, the chief of Zepho, the chief of Kenaz,,And these are the kings that reigned in the land of Edom, before there reigned any king over the children of Israel.,And these are the sons of Reuel Esau’s son: the chief of Nahath, the chief of Zerah, the chief of Shammah, the chief of Mizzah. These are the chiefs that came of Reuel in the land of Edom. These are the sons of Basemath Esau’s wife.,And these are the names of the chiefs that came of Esau, according to their families, after their places, by their names: the chief of Timna, the chief of Alvah, the chief of Jetheth;,the chief of Oholibamah, the chief of Elah, the chief of Pinon;,And these are the sons of Reuel: Nahath, and Zerah, Shammah, and Mizzah. These were the sons of Basemath Esau’s wife.,And Baal-hanan the son of Achbor died, and Hadar reigned in his stead; and the name of the city was Pau; and his wife’s name was Mehetabel, the daughter of Matred, the daughter of Me-zahab.,Now these are the generations of Esau—the same is Edom.,And Esau dwelt in the mountain-land of Seir—Esau is Edom.,And these were the sons of Oholibamah the daughter of Anah, the daughter of Zibeon, Esau’s wife; and she bore to Esau Jeush, and Jalam, and Korah.,These are the sons of Seir the Horite, the inhabitants of the land: Lotan and Shobal and Zibeon and Anah


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Septuagint, Tobit, 4.12 (10th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4.12. Beware, my son, of all immorality. First of all take a wife from among the descendants of your fathers and do not marry a foreign woman, who is not of your fathers tribe; for we are the sons of the prophets. Remember, my son, that Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, our fathers of old, all took wives from among their brethren. They were blessed in their children, and their posterity will inherit the land.
2. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 15.22-15.27 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

15.22. וַיַּסַּע מֹשֶׁה אֶת־יִשְׂרָאֵל מִיַּם־סוּף וַיֵּצְאוּ אֶל־מִדְבַּר־שׁוּר וַיֵּלְכוּ שְׁלֹשֶׁת־יָמִים בַּמִּדְבָּר וְלֹא־מָצְאוּ מָיִם׃ 15.23. וַיָּבֹאוּ מָרָתָה וְלֹא יָכְלוּ לִשְׁתֹּת מַיִם מִמָּרָה כִּי מָרִים הֵם עַל־כֵּן קָרָא־שְׁמָהּ מָרָה׃ 15.24. וַיִּלֹּנוּ הָעָם עַל־מֹשֶׁה לֵּאמֹר מַה־נִּשְׁתֶּה׃ 15.25. וַיִּצְעַק אֶל־יְהוָה וַיּוֹרֵהוּ יְהוָה עֵץ וַיַּשְׁלֵךְ אֶל־הַמַּיִם וַיִּמְתְּקוּ הַמָּיִם שָׁם שָׂם לוֹ חֹק וּמִשְׁפָּט וְשָׁם נִסָּהוּ׃ 15.26. וַיֹּאמֶר אִם־שָׁמוֹעַ תִּשְׁמַע לְקוֹל יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ וְהַיָּשָׁר בְּעֵינָיו תַּעֲשֶׂה וְהַאֲזַנְתָּ לְמִצְוֺתָיו וְשָׁמַרְתָּ כָּל־חֻקָּיו כָּל־הַמַּחֲלָה אֲשֶׁר־שַׂמְתִּי בְמִצְרַיִם לֹא־אָשִׂים עָלֶיךָ כִּי אֲנִי יְהוָה רֹפְאֶךָ׃ 15.27. וַיָּבֹאוּ אֵילִמָה וְשָׁם שְׁתֵּים עֶשְׂרֵה עֵינֹת מַיִם וְשִׁבְעִים תְּמָרִים וַיַּחֲנוּ־שָׁם עַל־הַמָּיִם׃ 15.22. And Moses led Israel onward from the Red Sea, and they went out into the wilderness of Shur; and they went three days in the wilderness, and found no water." 15.23. And when they came to Marah, they could not drink of the waters of Marah, for they were bitter. Therefore the name of it was called Marah." 15.24. And the people murmured against Moses, saying: ‘What shall we drink?’" 15.25. And he cried unto the LORD; and the LORD showed him a tree, and he cast it into the waters, and the waters were made sweet. There He made for them a statute and an ordice, and there He proved them;" 15.26. and He said: ‘If thou wilt diligently hearken to the voice of the LORD thy God, and wilt do that which is right in His eyes, and wilt give ear to His commandments, and keep all His statutes, I will put none of the diseases upon thee, which I have put upon the Egyptians; for I am the LORD that healeth thee.’" 15.27. And they came to Elim, where were twelve springs of water, and three score and ten palm-trees; and they encamped there by the waters."
3. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 45.6 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

45.6. כִּי־זֶה שְׁנָתַיִם הָרָעָב בְּקֶרֶב הָאָרֶץ וְעוֹד חָמֵשׁ שָׁנִים אֲשֶׁר אֵין־חָרִישׁ וְקָצִּיר׃ 45.6. For these two years hath the famine been in the land; and there are yet five years, in which there shall be neither plowing nor harvest."
4. Hebrew Bible, 2 Kings, 3.19, 3.25, 20.20 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.19. וְהִכִּיתֶם כָּל־עִיר מִבְצָר וְכָל־עִיר מִבְחוֹר וְכָל־עֵץ טוֹב תַּפִּילוּ וְכָל־מַעְיְנֵי־מַיִם תִּסְתֹּמוּ וְכֹל הַחֶלְקָה הַטּוֹבָה תַּכְאִבוּ בָּאֲבָנִים׃ 3.25. וְהֶעָרִים יַהֲרֹסוּ וְכָל־חֶלְקָה טוֹבָה יַשְׁלִיכוּ אִישׁ־אַבְנוֹ וּמִלְאוּהָ וְכָל־מַעְיַן־מַיִם יִסְתֹּמוּ וְכָל־עֵץ־טוֹב יַפִּילוּ עַד־הִשְׁאִיר אֲבָנֶיהָ בַּקִּיר חֲרָשֶׂת וַיָּסֹבּוּ הַקַּלָּעִים וַיַּכּוּהָ׃ 3.19. And ye shall smite every fortified city, and every choice city, and shall fell every good tree, and stop all fountains of water, and mar every good piece of land with stones.’" 3.25. And they beat down the cities; and on every good piece of land they cast every man his stone, and filled it; and they stopped all the fountains of water, and felled all the good trees; until there was left only Kir-hareseth with the stones of the wall thereof; so the slingers encompassed it, and smote it." 20.20. Now the rest of the acts of Hezekiah, and all his might, and how he made the pool, and the conduit, and brought water into the city, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah?"
5. Hebrew Bible, 2 Samuel, 12.26-12.27 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12.26. וַיִּלָּחֶם יוֹאָב בְּרַבַּת בְּנֵי עַמּוֹן וַיִּלְכֹּד אֶת־עִיר הַמְּלוּכָה׃ 12.27. וַיִּשְׁלַח יוֹאָב מַלְאָכִים אֶל־דָּוִד וַיֹּאמֶר נִלְחַמְתִּי בְרַבָּה גַּם־לָכַדְתִּי אֶת־עִיר הַמָּיִם׃ 12.26. And Yo᾽av fought against Rabba of the children of ῾Ammon, and took the royal city." 12.27. And Yo᾽av sent messengers to David, and said, I have fought against Rabba, and have taken the water town."
6. Hebrew Bible, Judges, 1.13, 1.24-1.26 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.13. וַיִּלְכְּדָהּ עָתְנִיאֵל בֶּן־קְנַז אֲחִי כָלֵב הַקָּטֹן מִמֶּנּוּ וַיִּתֶּן־לוֹ אֶת־עַכְסָה בִתּוֹ לְאִשָּׁה׃ 1.24. וַיִּרְאוּ הַשֹּׁמְרִים אִישׁ יוֹצֵא מִן־הָעִיר וַיֹּאמְרוּ לוֹ הַרְאֵנוּ נָא אֶת־מְבוֹא הָעִיר וְעָשִׂינוּ עִמְּךָ חָסֶד׃ 1.25. וַיַּרְאֵם אֶת־מְבוֹא הָעִיר וַיַּכּוּ אֶת־הָעִיר לְפִי־חָרֶב וְאֶת־הָאִישׁ וְאֶת־כָּל־מִשְׁפַּחְתּוֹ שִׁלֵּחוּ׃ 1.26. וַיֵּלֶךְ הָאִישׁ אֶרֶץ הַחִתִּים וַיִּבֶן עִיר וַיִּקְרָא שְׁמָהּ לוּז הוּא שְׁמָהּ עַד הַיּוֹם הַזֶּה׃ 1.13. And ῾Otni᾽el the son of Qenaz, Kalev’s younger brother, took it: and he gave him ῾Akhsa his daughter to wife." 1.24. And the scouts saw a man come out of the city, and they said to him, Show us, we pray thee, the entrance into the city, and we will deal kindly with thee." 1.25. And when he showed them the entrance to the city, they smote the city with the edge of the sword; but they let the man and all his family go free." 1.26. And the man went into the land of the Ĥittim, and built a city, and called its name Luz: which is its name to this day."
7. Herodotus, Histories, 1.84, 7.213-7.218 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.84. This is how Sardis was taken. When Croesus had been besieged for fourteen days, Cyrus sent horsemen around in his army to promise to reward whoever first mounted the wall. ,After this the army made an assault, but with no success. Then, when all the others were stopped, a certain Mardian called Hyroeades attempted to mount by a part of the acropolis where no guard had been set, since no one feared that it could be taken by an attack made here. ,For here the height on which the acropolis stood is sheer and unlikely to be assaulted; this was the only place where Meles the former king of Sardis had not carried the lion which his concubine had borne him, the Telmessians having declared that if this lion were carried around the walls, Sardis could never be taken. Meles then carried the lion around the rest of the wall of the acropolis where it could be assaulted, but neglected this place, because the height was sheer and defied attack. It is on the side of the city which faces towards Tmolus. ,The day before, then, Hyroeades, this Mardian, had seen one of the Lydians come down by this part of the acropolis after a helmet that had fallen down, and fetch it; he took note of this and considered it. ,And now he climbed up himself, and other Persians after him. Many ascended, and thus Sardis was taken and all the city sacked. 7.213. The king was at a loss as to how to deal with the present difficulty. Epialtes son of Eurydemus, a Malian, thinking he would get a great reward from the king, came to speak with him and told him of the path leading over the mountain to Thermopylae. In so doing he caused the destruction of the Hellenes remaining there. ,Later he fled into Thessaly in fear of the Lacedaemonians, and while he was in exile, a price was put on his head by the Pylagori when the Amphictyons assembled at Pylae. Still later he returned from exile to Anticyra and was killed by Athenades, a Trachinian. ,Athenades slew Epialtes for a different reason, which I will tell later in my history, but he was given no less honor by the Lacedaemonians. It was in this way, then, that Epialtes was later killed. 7.214. There is another story told, namely that Onetes son of Phanagoras, a Carystian, and Corydallus of Anticyra are the ones who gave the king this information and guided the Persians around the mountain, but I find it totally incredible. ,One must judge by the fact that the Pylagori set a price not on Onetes and Corydallus but on Epialtes the Trachinian, and I suppose they had exact knowledge; furthermore, we know that Epialtes was banished on this charge. ,Onetes might have known the path, although he was not a Malian, if he had often come to that country, but Epialtes was the one who guided them along the path around the mountain. It is he whom I put on record as guilty. 7.215. Xerxes was pleased by what Epialtes promised to accomplish. He immediately became overjoyed and sent out Hydarnes and the men under Hydarnes command, who set forth from the camp at about lamp-lighting time. This path had been discovered by the native Malians, who used it to guide the Thessalians into Phocis when the Phocians had fenced off the pass with a wall and were sheltered from the war. So long ago the Malians had discovered that the pass was in no way a good thing. 7.216. The course of the path is as follows: it begins at the river Asopus as it flows through the ravine, and this mountain and the path have the same name, Anopaea. This Anopaea stretches along the ridge of the mountain and ends at Alpenus, the Locrian city nearest to Malis, near the rock called Blackbuttock and the seats of the Cercopes, where it is narrowest. 7.217. This, then, was the nature of the pass. The Persians crossed the Asopus and travelled all night along this path, with the Oetaean mountains on their right and the Trachinian on their left. At dawn they came to the summit of the pass. ,In this part of the mountain one thousand armed men of the Phocians were on watch, as I have already shown, defending their own country and guarding the path. The lower pass was held by those I have mentioned, but the Phocians had voluntarily promised Leonidas to guard the path over the mountain. 7.218. The Phocians learned in the following way that the Persians had climbed up: they had ascended without the Phocians' notice because the mountain was entirely covered with oak trees. Although there was no wind, a great noise arose like leaves being trodden underfoot. The Phocians jumped up and began to put on their weapons, and in a moment the barbarians were there. ,When they saw the men arming themselves, they were amazed, for they had supposed that no opposition would appear, but they had now met with an army. Hydarnes feared that the Phocians might be Lacedaemonians and asked Epialtes what country the army was from. When he had established what he wanted to know with certainty, he arrayed the Persians for battle. ,The Phocians, assailed by thick showers of arrows and supposing that the Persians had set out against them from the start, fled to the top of the mountain and prepared to meet their destruction. This is what they intended, but the Persians with Epialtes and Hydarnes paid no attention to the Phocians and went down the mountain as fast as possible.
8. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 4.3.8-4.3.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.3.8. That day and night, accordingly, they remained there, in great perplexity. But Xenophon had a dream; he thought that he was bound in fetters, but that the fetters fell off from him of their own accord, so that he was released and could take as long steps διαβαίνειν, which also means to cross a river (see above). Here lay the good omen of the dream. as he pleased. When dawn came, he went to Cheirisophus, told him he had hopes that all would be well, and related to him his dream. 4.3.9. Cheirisophus was pleased, and as soon as day began to break, all the generals were at hand and proceeded to offer sacrifices. And with the very first victim the omens were favourable. Then the generals and captains withdrew from the sacrifice and gave orders to the troops to get their breakfasts. 4.3.10. While Xenophon was breakfasting, two young men came running up to him; for all knew that they might go to him whether he was breakfasting or dining, and that if he were asleep, they might awaken him and tell him whatever they might have to tell that concerned the war. 4.3.11. In the present case the young men reported that they had happened to be gathering dry sticks for the purpose of making a fire, and that while so occupied they had descried across the river, among some rocks that reached down to the very edge of the river, an old man and a woman and some little girls putting away what looked like bags of clothes in a cavernous rock. 4.3.12. When they saw this proceeding, they said, they made up their minds that it was safe for them to cross, for this was a place that was not accesible to the enemy’s cavalry. They accordingly stripped, keeping only their daggers, and started across naked, supposing that they would have to swim; but they went on and got across without wetting themselves up to the middle; once on the other side, they took the clothes and came back again. 4.3.13. Upon hearing this report Xenopohon immediately proceeded to pour a libation himself, and directed his attendants to fill a cup for the young men and to pray to the gods who had revealed the dream and the ford, to bring to fulfilment the other blessings also. Especially a safe crossing and a safe return to Greece . The libation accomplished, he at once led the young men to Cheirisophus, and they repeated their story to him.
9. Septuagint, Tobit, 4.12 (4th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4.12. Beware, my son, of all immorality. First of all take a wife from among the descendants of your fathers and do not marry a foreign woman, who is not of your fathers tribe; for we are the sons of the prophets. Remember, my son, that Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, our fathers of old, all took wives from among their brethren. They were blessed in their children, and their posterity will inherit the land.
10. Demetrius Lacon, Fragments, 2-6, 1 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

11. Septuagint, Judith, 3.8, 5.3, 5.5, 7.18, 8.11, 8.32, 12.6, 14.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 0th cent. CE)

3.8. And he demolished all their shrines and cut down their sacred groves; for it had been given to him to destroy all the gods of the land, so that all nations should worship Nebuchadnezzar only, and all their tongues and tribes should call upon him as god. 5.3. and said to them, "Tell me, you Canaanites, what people is this that lives in the hill country? What cities do they inhabit? How large is their army, and in what does their power or strength consist? Who rules over them as king, leading their army? 5.5. Then Achior, the leader of all the Ammonites, said to him, "Let my lord now hear a word from the mouth of your servant, and I will tell you the truth about this people that dwells in the nearby mountain district. No falsehood shall come from your servant's mouth. 7.18. And the sons of Esau and the sons of Ammon went up and encamped in the hill country opposite Dothan; and they sent some of their men toward the south and the east, toward Acraba, which is near Chusi beside the brook Mochmur. The rest of the Assyrian army encamped in the plain, and covered the whole face of the land, and their tents and supply trains spread out in great number, and they formed a vast multitude. 8.11. They came to her, and she said to them, "Listen to me, rulers of the people of Bethulia! What you have said to the people today is not right; you have even sworn and pronounced this oath between God and you, promising to surrender the city to our enemies unless the Lord turns and helps us within so many days. 8.32. Judith said to them, "Listen to me. I am about to do a thing which will go down through all generations of our descendants. 12.6. and sent to Holofernes and said, "Let my lord now command that your servant be permitted to go out and pray. 14.1. Then Judith said to them, "Listen to me, my brethren, and take this head and hang it upon the parapet of your wall.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 15
achior, as humble servant Gera, Judith (2014) 239
ammon and ammonites Gera, Judith (2014) 239
angels of the divine presence, in tobit Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
apocrypha and pseudepigrapha of hebrew bible, rewritten scriptures Carleton Paget and Schaper, The New Cambridge History of the Bible (2013) 173
apocrypha and pseudepigrapha of hebrew bible Carleton Paget and Schaper, The New Cambridge History of the Bible (2013) 173
army, assyrian, officers Gera, Judith (2014) 239
asenath (aseneth) Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
babel, tower of babel Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 15
book of biblical antiquities (liber antiquitatum biblicarum or lab, pseudo-philo) Carleton Paget and Schaper, The New Cambridge History of the Bible (2013) 173
burial of death, tobit Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
circumcision Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 217
claudius Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
coastal cities and people Gera, Judith (2014) 239
dead sea Gera, Judith (2014) 239
death, tobit Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
demetrius, chronographer, biblical chronology Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
demetrius, chronographer, biblical events mentioned Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
demetrius, chronographer, biblical omissions Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
demetrius, chronographer, biblicism Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
demetrius, chronographer, divergences from bible Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
demetrius, chronographer, general profile Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
demetrius, chronographer Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
diaspora, eastern Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
dispersion\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 15
edom and edomites Gera, Judith (2014) 239
ephialtes Gera, Judith (2014) 239
epictetus Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
esau Gera, Judith (2014) 239
esther, book of Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
etiology\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 15
eusebius Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
food, eating and drinking Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
gaius caligula Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
galen Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
genesis, book of Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
genesis\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 15
hanina, rabbi Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 217
herod\u2002, primeval history Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 15
huna, rav Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 217
jacob Gera, Judith (2014) 239
jerome Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
jerusalem Gera, Judith (2014) 239
joseph and aseneth (asenath) Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
judith, book of Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
julius gaius alexander Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
lab (liber antiquitatum biblicarum or book of biblical antiquities, pseudo-philo) Carleton Paget and Schaper, The New Cambridge History of the Bible (2013) 173
language and style, book of judith, future forms Gera, Judith (2014) 239
language and style, book of judith, imperatives Gera, Judith (2014) 239
language and style, book of judith, particles and connectives Gera, Judith (2014) 239
liber antiquitatum biblicarum or lab (book of biblical antiquities, pseudo-philo) Carleton Paget and Schaper, The New Cambridge History of the Bible (2013) 173
lord, as master of servants Gera, Judith (2014) 239
mediterranean sea Gera, Judith (2014) 239
military terminology Gera, Judith (2014) 239
moab and moabites Gera, Judith (2014) 239
peshat Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 217
pharisees Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
philo of alexandria, apocrypha and pseudepigrapha Carleton Paget and Schaper, The New Cambridge History of the Bible (2013) 173
philo of alexandria Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
philodemus Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
plotinus Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
prayer, supplication, tobit Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
pseudo-philo, book of biblical antiquities (liber antiquitatum biblicarum or lab) Carleton Paget and Schaper, The New Cambridge History of the Bible (2013) 173
ptolemy iv philopator Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
qumran, fragments of tobit ix Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
revelation of baruch, rewritten scriptures Carleton Paget and Schaper, The New Cambridge History of the Bible (2013) 173
self-proclaimed Gera, Judith (2014) 239
sieges Gera, Judith (2014) 239
therapeutae/therapeutrides Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
thermopylae Gera, Judith (2014) 239
tiberius julius alexander' Levine Allison and Crossan, The Historical Jesus in Context (2006) 297
torah Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 200
water shortage Gera, Judith (2014) 239
worship Bay, Biblical Heroes and Classical Culture in Christian Late Antiquity: The Historiography, Exemplarity, and Anti-Judaism of Pseudo-Hegesippus (2022) 330
xenophon Gera, Judith (2014) 239
xerxes Gera, Judith (2014) 239
zipporah Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 107
– governing rules of Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 217
– literalism and Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 217
– vs. midrash Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 217