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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5968
Galen, On The Powers Of Simple Remedies, 10
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Aristophanes, Women of The Assembly, 405, 397 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

397. γνώμας καθεῖναι τῆς πόλεως; κᾆτ' εὐθέως
2. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 717-725, 716 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

716. πρῶτον δὲ πάντων τῷ Νεοκλείδῃ φάρμακον
3. Hippocrates, Letters, 15 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 4.22 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Aelian, Nature of Animals, 11.31, 11.34 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 48.28-48.35, 50.53-50.54 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.11, 4.34 (2nd cent. CE

4.11. Having purged the Ephesians of the plague, and having had enough of the people of Ionia, he started for Hellas. Having made his way then to Pergamum, and being pleased with the sanctuary of Asclepius, he gave hints to the supplicants of the god, what to do in order to obtain favorable dreams; and having healed many of them he came to the land of Ilium. And when his mind was glutted with all the traditions of their past, he went to visit the tombs of the Achaeans, and he delivered himself of many speeches over them, and he offered many sacrifices of a bloodless and pure kind; and then he bade his companions go on board ship, for he himself, he said, must spend a night on the mound of Achilles. Now his companions tried to deter him — for in fact the Dioscoridae and the Phaedimi, and a whole company of such already followed in the train of Apollonius — alleging that Achilles was still dreadful as a phantom; for such was the conviction about him of the inhabitants of Ilium. Nevertheless, said Apollonius, I know Achilles well and that he thoroughly delights in company; for he heartily welcomed Nestor when he came from Pylos, because he always had something useful to tell him; and he used to honor Phoenix with the title of foster-father and companion and so forth, because Phoenix entertained him with his talk; and he looked most mildly upon Priam also, although he was his bitterest enemy, so soon as he heard him talk; and when in the course of a quarrel he had an interview with Odysseus, he made himself so gracious that Odysseus thought him more handsome than terrible.For, I think that his shield and his plumes that wave so terribly, as they say, are a menace to the Trojans, because he can never forget what he suffered at their hands, when they played him false over the marriage. But I have nothing in common with Ilium, and I shall talk to him more pleasantly than his former companions; and if he slays me, as you say he will, why then I shall repose with Memnon and Cycnus, and perhaps Troy will bury me in a hollow sepulcher as they did Hector. Such were his words to his companions, half playful and half serious, as he went up alone to the barrow; but they went on board ship, for it was already evening. 4.34. He stayed in Sparta for some time after the Olympic Festival, until the winter was over; and at the beginning of the spring proceeded to Malea with the intention of setting out for Rome. But while he was still pondering this project, he had the following dream: It seemed as if a woman both very tall and venerable in years embraced him, and asked him to visit her before he set sail for Italy; and she said that she was the nurse of Zeus, and she wore a wreath that held everything that is on the earth or in the seas. He proceeded to ponder the meaning of the vision, and came to the conclusion that he ought first to sail to Crete, which we regard as the nurse of Zeus, because in that island Zeus was born; although the wreath might perhaps indicate some other island. Now there were several ships at Malea, making ready to set sail to Crete, so he embarked upon one sufficient for his association, which is the title he gave to his companions, and also his companions' servants, for he did not think it right to pass over the latter. And he bent his course for Cydonia, and sailed past that place to Knossus, where a labyrinth is shown, which, I believe, once on a time, contained the Minotaur. As his companions were anxious to see this he allowed them to do so, but refused himself to be a spectator of the injustice of Minos, and continued his course to Gortyna because he longed to visit Ida. He accordingly climbed up, and after visiting the sacred sites he passed on to the shrine of Lebena. And this is a shrine of Asclepius, and just as the whole of Asia flocks to Pergamon, so the whole of Crete flocked to this shrine; and many Libyans also cross the sea to visit it, for it faces towards the Libyan sea close to Phaestus, where the little rock keeps out a might sea. And they say that this shrine is named that of Lebena, because a promontory juts out from it which resembles a lion, for here, as often, a chance arrangement of the rocks suggests an animal form; and they tell a story about this promontory, how it was once one of the lion which were yoked in the chariot of Rhea. Here Apollonius was haranguing on one occasion about midday, and was addressing quite a number of people who were worshipping at the shrine, when an earthquake shook the whole of Crete at once, and a roar of thunder was heard to issue not from the clouds but from the earth, and the sea receded about seven stadia. And most of them were afraid that the sea by receding in this way would drag the temple after it, so that they would be carried away. But Apollonius said: Be of good courage, for the sea has given birth and brought forth land. And they thought that he was alluding to the harmony of the elements, and was urging that the sea would never wreak any violence upon the land; but after a few days some travelers arrived from Cydoniatis and announced that on the very day on which this portent occurred and just at the same hour of midday, an island rose out of the sea in the firth between Thera and Crete. However, I must give up all prolixity and hurry on to relate the conversations which he held in Rome, subsequently to his stay in Crete.
8. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 1.25 (2nd cent. CE

9. Iamblichus, Concerning The Mysteries, 3.3 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

10. Oribasius, Liber Incertus (Collectiones Medicae Libri Incerti), 45.30.10-45.30.14 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

11. Epigraphy, Ig Iv ,1, 255

12. Various, Anthologia Palatina, 6.330



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122, 199
aeschines (athenian orator), length of stay at epidauros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
aeschines (athenian orator) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
alexandria, sarapieion of parmeniskos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
alexandria sarapieion, in artemidorus Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
aristophaness plutus incubation scene, asklepios employing medicine Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
artemidorus, and prescriptive dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
asklepieia, anatomical dedications Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
asklepieia, length of stays Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
asklepieia, sanctuaries drawing non-local clientele Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
asklepieia, written evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
asklepios, and rational medicine Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25, 230
asklepios, as alternative to physicians Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
asklepios, as physician or surgeon in dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
asklepios, dedications of ears or eyes Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
asklepios, prescriptions attributed to asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25, 230
asklepios, question of evolution in healing modus operandi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
asklepios, specific ailments cured, hearing problems Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
asklepios, specific ailments cured, ulceration on head Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
asklepios, surgery prompted by asklepios dream Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
asklepios Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97; Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122, 199, 230
athenodoros dipinto as aretalogy, for sarapis Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
athens asklepieion, incubation by plutarch Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
authority Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
chinese mantic practice, divine Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
cult personnel (egyptian and greco-egyptian), nakoros identified with gate-keepers Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
dedicatory formulas (greek and latin), κατ ἐπιταγήν Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
dedicatory formulas (greek and latin), κατ ὄνειρον Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
dedicatory objects, reliefs representing ears Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
dream recall, and medicine Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
dream recall, in private lives Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
dream recall, repetition of Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
dreams Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
dreams (general), prescriptive dreams and medical knowledge Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelian, on the nature of animals Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelius aristides, sacred tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
dreams (in greek and latin literature), damascius, philosophical history Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
dreams (in greek and latin literature), galen, on the nature and powers of simple medications Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
dreams (in greek and latin literature), galen, on treatment by venesection Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
dreams (in greek and latin literature), galen, outline of empiricism Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25, 122
dreams (in greek and latin literature), philostratus, lives of the sophists Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
dreams (in greek and latin literature), rufus of ephesus in oribasius, remains of medical collections Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
epidauros asklepieion, regular clientele and distinguished visitors Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
epidauros miracle inscriptions, testimonies with asklepios using medicine Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
galen, and asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
galen, and medical/prescriptive dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25, 199, 230
galen Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
gods, in dreams Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
gods Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
gortyn Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
healing sanctuaries Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
hermokrates of phokaia (sophist), prescription from asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
hippocrates, and inscribed cures at kos asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
iamblichus Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
incubation, divinatory vs. therapeutic incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
kos asklepieion, inscribed records of cures Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
lebena asklepieion, clientele Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
marcus aurelius Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
medicine, dreams and Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
memory Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
pergamon Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
pergamon asklepieion, anatomical relief Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
pergamon asklepieion, clientele Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 122
pergamon asklepieion, dedicatory formulas and incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
pergamon asklepieion, dedicatory inscriptions pertaining to incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
pergamon asklepieion, in artemidorus Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
pergamon asklepieion, literary sources for incubation (excluding aristides) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199, 230
pergamon asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
physicians, gods viewed as alternatives to physicians Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 25
plutarch Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
polemo (sophist), prescription from asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 230
religion, of dreams Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
sarapis, at unidentified fayoum sarapieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
sarapis, in dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
sarapis, incubation in cult Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
sarapis, prescriptions attributed to sarapis Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
sarapis, question of therapeutic incubation at lesser egyptian sarapieia Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
sarapis, tales of curing animals Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
significance, divinatory Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
snake-derived drug Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97
temple medicine (egypt), specific prescriptions from gods Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 341
truth' Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 97