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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5664
Eusebius Of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 6.8.16
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Cicero, Academica, 1.42 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.42. sed inter scientiam et inscientiam comprehensionem illam quam dixi collocabat, eamque neque in rectis neque in pravis paruis *g numerabat, sed soli credendum esse dicebat. E quo sensibus etiam fidem tribuebat, quod ut supra dixi comprehensio facta sensibus et vera esse illi et fidelis videbatur, non quod quod om. *g, in ras. p omnia quae essent in re comprehenderet, sed quia nihil quod cadere in eam eam nat. Man. n. eam Fab. posset relinqueret, quodque natura quasi normam scientiae et principium sui dedisset unde postea notiones rerum in animis imprimerentur; e quibus non principia solum sed latiores quaedam ad rationem inveniendam viae reperiuntur. aperituntur Man. -rirentur Dav. reperirentur Gr. errorem autem et temeritatem et ignorantiam ignorationem s et opinationem et suspicionem et uno nomine omnia quae essent aliena firmae et constantis assensionis a virtute sapientiaque removebat. Atque in his fere commutatio constitit omnis dissensioque Zenonis a superioribus.”
2. Cicero, On Divination, 2.61 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.61. Quorum omnium causas si a Chrysippo quaeram, ipse ille divinationis auctor numquam illa dicet facta fortuito naturalemque rationem omnium reddet; nihil enim fieri sine causa potest; nec quicquam fit, quod fieri non potest; nec, si id factum est, quod potuit fieri, portentum debet videri; nulla igitur portenta sunt. Nam si, quod raro fit, id portentum putandum est, sapientem esse portentum est; saepius enim mulam peperisse arbitror quam sapientem fuisse. Illa igitur ratio concluditur: nec id, quod non potuerit fieri, factum umquam esse, nec, quod potuerit, id portentum esse; 2.61. If I were to ask Chrysippus the causes of all the phenomena just mentioned, that distinguished writer on divination would never say that they happened by chance, but he would find an explanation for each of them in the laws of nature. For he would say: Nothing can happen without a cause; nothing actually happens that cannot happen; if that has happened which could have happened, then it should not be considered a portent; therefore there are no such things as portents. Now if a thing is to be considered a portent because it is seldom seen, then a wise man is a portent; for, as I think, it oftener happens that a mule brings forth a colt than that nature produces a sage. Chrysippus, in this connexion, gives the following syllogism: That which could not have happened never did happen; and that which could have happened is no portent; therefore, in any view, there is no such thing as a portent.
3. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 2.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.7. istam voluptatem, inquit, Epicurus ignorat? Non semper, inquam; nam interdum nimis nimis minus R etiam novit, quippe qui testificetur ne intellegere quidem se posse ubi sit aut quod sit ullum bonum praeter illud, quod cibo et potione et aurium delectatione et obscena voluptate capiatur. an haec ab eo non dicuntur? Quasi vero me pudeat, inquit, istorum, aut non possim quem ad modum ea dicantur ostendere! Ego vero non dubito, inquam, quin facile possis, nec est quod te pudeat sapienti adsentiri, qui se unus, quod sciam, sapientem profiteri sit ausus. nam Metrodorum non puto ipsum professum, sed, cum appellaretur ab Epicuro, repudiare tantum beneficium noluisse; septem autem illi non suo, sed populorum suffragio omnium nominati sunt. 2.7.  "What then?" he replied; "does not Epicurus recognize pleasure in your sense?" "Not always," said I; "now and then, I admit, he recognizes it only too fully; for he solemnly avows that he cannot even understand what Good there can be or where it can be found, apart from that which is derived from food and drink, the delight of the ears, and the grosser forms of gratification. Do I misrepresent his words?" "Just as if I were ashamed of all that," he cried, "or unable to explain the sense in which it is spoken!" "Oh," said I, "I haven't the least doubt you can explain it with ease. And you have no reason to be ashamed of sharing the opinions of a Wise Man — who stands alone, so far as I am aware, in venturing to arrogate to himself that title. For I do not suppose that Metrodorus himself claimed to be a Wise Man, though he did not care to refuse the compliment when the name was bestowed upon him by Epicurus; while the famous Seven of old received their appellation not by their own votes, but by the universal suffrage of mankind.
4. Plutarch, On Stoic Self-Contradictions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 42.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Alexander of Aphrodisias, On Fate, 28.199.16-28.199.18 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Lucian, Philosophies For Sale, 20 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.162, 7.177 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.162. After meeting Polemo, says Diocles of Magnesia, while Zeno was suffering from a protracted illness, he recanted his views. The Stoic doctrine to which he attached most importance was the wise man's refusal to hold mere opinions. And against this doctrine Persaeus was contending when he induced one of a pair of twins to deposit a certain sum with Ariston and afterwards got the other to reclaim it. Ariston being thus reduced to perplexity was refuted. He was at variance with Arcesilaus; and one day when he saw an abortion in the shape of a bull with a uterus, he said, Alas, here Arcesilaus has had given into his hand an argument against the evidence of the senses. 7.177. 6. SPHAERUSAmongst those who after the death of Zeno became pupils of Cleanthes was Sphaerus of Bosporus, as already mentioned. After making considerable progress in his studies, he went to Alexandria to the court of King Ptolemy Philopator. One day when a discussion had arisen on the question whether the wise man could stoop to hold opinion, and Sphaerus had maintained that this was impossible, the king, wishing to refute him, ordered some waxen pomegranates to be put on the table. Sphaerus was taken in and the king cried out, You have given your assent to a presentation which is false. But Sphaerus was ready with a neat answer. I assented not to the proposition that they are pomegranates, but to another, that there are good grounds for thinking them to be pomegranates. Certainty of presentation and reasonable probability are two totally different things. Mnesistratus having accused him of denying that Ptolemy was a king, his reply was, Being of such quality as he is, Ptolemy is indeed a king.
9. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 6.8.11, 6.8.13 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

10. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 3.2.3 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

11. Stobaeus, Anthology, 2.66, 2.111 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aristo, sagehood of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134
chrysippus, on fate Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 131, 132, 133
chrysippus, on the etymology of fate Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 131
chrysippus, sagehood of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 131, 132, 133, 134
cicero Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134; Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 8
cleanthes, on portion Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130
cleanthes, on typhon Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130
cleanthes, sagehood of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 134
diogenes laertius Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134
diogenianus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 131, 132, 133, 134
etymology, of fate Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 131
eusebius of caesarea Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 131, 132, 133, 134
fate (heimarmenē, lat., fatum) , chrysippus on Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 131, 132, 133
fate (heimarmenē, lat., fatum) , chrysippus on the etymology of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 131
historical sages Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 8
moral progress Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 8
orestes Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 132
persaeus, sagehood of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134
phoenix Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 8
plutarch Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 134
portion (moira), cleanthes on Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130
portion (moira), socrates on Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130
related fabulously about, chrysippus on the Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 132
related fabulously about, of aristo Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134
related fabulously about, of chrysippus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 131, 132, 133, 134
related fabulously about, of cleanthes Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 134
related fabulously about, of persaeus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134
related fabulously about, of sphaerus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134
related fabulously about, of the stoics' Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134
related fabulously about, of the stoics Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 131, 132, 133
related fabulously about, of zeno Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134
sagehood Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 8
sextus empiricus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130, 133, 134
socrates, on typhon Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130
sphaerus, sagehood of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134
stoic Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 8
stoics Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 8
typhon, socrates on Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 130
virtue Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 8
wisdom (sophia), sagehood of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 134