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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5662
Eusebius Of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 5.17.4


nanAnd again after a little he says: For if after Quadratus and Ammia in Philadelphia, as they assert, the women with Montanus received the prophetic gift, let them show who among them received it from Montanus and the women. For the apostle thought it necessary that the prophetic gift should continue in all the Church until the final coming. But they cannot show it, though this is the fourteenth year since the death of Maximilla.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 22.1-22.2, 22.4-22.5, 22.7-22.9, 22.16-22.18, 22.23 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

22.1. לַמְנַצֵּחַ עַל־אַיֶּלֶת הַשַּׁחַר מִזְמוֹר לְדָוִד׃ 22.1. כִּי־אַתָּה גֹחִי מִבָּטֶן מַבְטִיחִי עַל־שְׁדֵי אִמִּי׃ 22.2. אֵלִי אֵלִי לָמָה עֲזַבְתָּנִי רָחוֹק מִישׁוּעָתִי דִּבְרֵי שַׁאֲגָתִי׃ 22.2. וְאַתָּה יְהוָה אַל־תִּרְחָק אֱיָלוּתִי לְעֶזְרָתִי חוּשָׁה׃ 22.4. וְאַתָּה קָדוֹשׁ יוֹשֵׁב תְּהִלּוֹת יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ 22.5. בְּךָ בָּטְחוּ אֲבֹתֵינוּ בָּטְחוּ וַתְּפַלְּטֵמוֹ׃ 22.7. וְאָנֹכִי תוֹלַעַת וְלֹא־אִישׁ חֶרְפַּת אָדָם וּבְזוּי עָם׃ 22.8. כָּל־רֹאַי יַלְעִגוּ לִי יַפְטִירוּ בְשָׂפָה יָנִיעוּ רֹאשׁ׃ 22.9. גֹּל אֶל־יְהוָה יְפַלְּטֵהוּ יַצִּילֵהוּ כִּי חָפֵץ בּוֹ׃ 22.16. יָבֵשׁ כַּחֶרֶשׂ כֹּחִי וּלְשׁוֹנִי מֻדְבָּק מַלְקוֹחָי וְלַעֲפַר־מָוֶת תִּשְׁפְּתֵנִי׃ 22.17. כִּי סְבָבוּנִי כְּלָבִים עֲדַת מְרֵעִים הִקִּיפוּנִי כָּאֲרִי יָדַי וְרַגְלָי׃ 22.18. אֲסַפֵּר כָּל־עַצְמוֹתָי הֵמָּה יַבִּיטוּ יִרְאוּ־בִי׃ 22.23. אֲסַפְּרָה שִׁמְךָ לְאֶחָי בְּתוֹךְ קָהָל אֲהַלְלֶךָּ׃ 22.1. For the Leader; upon Aijeleth ha-Shahar. A Psalm of David." 22.2. My God, my God, why hast Thou forsaken me, and art far from my help at the words of my cry?" 22.4. Yet Thou art holy, O Thou that art enthroned upon the praises of Israel." 22.5. In Thee did our fathers trust; they trusted, and Thou didst deliver them." 22.7. But I am a worm, and no man; a reproach of men, and despised of the people." 22.8. All they that see me laugh me to scorn; they shoot out the lip, they shake the head:" 22.9. 'Let him commit himself unto the LORD! let Him rescue him; let Him deliver him, seeing He delighteth in him.'" 22.16. My strength is dried up like a potsherd; and my tongue cleaveth to my throat; and Thou layest me in the dust of death." 22.17. For dogs have encompassed me; a company of evil-doers have inclosed me; like a lion, they are at my hands and my feet." 22.18. I may count all my bones; they look and gloat over me." 22.23. I will declare Thy name unto my brethren; in the midst of the congregation will I praise Thee."
2. New Testament, Acts, 11.27-11.28, 15.32, 21.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.27. Now in these days, prophets came down from Jerusalem to Antioch. 11.28. One of them named Agabus stood up, and indicated by the Spirit that there should be a great famine over all the world, which also happened in the days of Claudius. 15.32. Judas and Silas, also being prophets themselves, encouraged the brothers with many words, and strengthened them. 21.9. Now this man had four virgin daughters who prophesied.
3. New Testament, Apocalypse, 2.20, 3.7-3.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.20. But I have this against you, that you tolerate your woman, Jezebel, who calls herself a prophetess. She teaches and seduces my servants to commit sexual immorality, and to eat things sacrificed to idols. 3.7. To the angel of the assembly in Philadelphia write: "He who is holy, he who is true, he who has the key of David, he who opens and no one can shut, and that shuts and no one opens, says these things: 3.8. I know your works (behold, I have set before you an open door, which no one can shut), that you have a little power, and kept my word, and didn't deny my name. 3.9. Behold, I give of the synagogue of Satan, of those who say they are Jews, and they are not, but lie. Behold, I will make them to come and worship before your feet, and to know that I have loved you. 3.10. Because you kept the word of my patience, I also will keep you from the hour of testing, that which is to come on the whole world, to test those who dwell on the earth. 3.11. I come quickly. Hold firmly that which you have, so that no one takes your crown. 3.12. He who overcomes, I will make him a pillar in the temple of my God, and he will go out from there no more. I will write on him the name of my God, and the name of the city of my God, the new Jerusalem, which comes down out of heaven from my God, and my own new name. 3.13. He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the assemblies.
4. New Testament, Romans, 11.5, 13.8-13.9, 14.1, 14.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11.5. Even so then at this present time also there is a remt according to the election of grace. 13.8. Owe no one anything, except to love one another; for he who loves his neighbor has fulfilled the law. 13.9. For the commandments, "You shall not commit adultery," "You shall not murder," "You shall not steal," "You shall not give false testimony," "You shall not covet," and whatever other commandments there are, are all summed up in this saying, namely, "You shall love your neighbor as yourself. 14.1. Now receive one who is weak in faith, but not for disputes over opinions. 14.5. One man esteems one day as more important. Another esteems every day alike. Let each man be fully assured in his own mind.
5. New Testament, Luke, 2.36-2.38 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.36. There was one Anna, a prophetess, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher (she was of a great age, having lived with a husband seven years from her virginity 2.37. and she had been a widow for about eighty-four years), who didn't depart from the temple, worshipping with fastings and petitions night and day. 2.38. Coming up at that very hour, she gave thanks to the Lord, and spoke of him to all those who were looking for redemption in Jerusalem.
6. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 102-103, 105-106, 97, 100 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

100. In what sense Christ is [called] Jacob, and Israel, and Son of Man Justin: Then what follows—'But You, the praise of Israel, inhabit the holy place'— declared that He is to do something worthy of praise and wonderment, being about to rise again from the dead on the third day after the crucifixion; and this He has obtained from the Father. For I have showed already that Christ is called both Jacob and Israel; and I have proved that it is not in the blessing of Joseph and Judah alone that what relates to Him was proclaimed mysteriously, but also in the Gospel it is written that He said: 'All things are delivered unto me by My Father.' and, 'No man knows the Father but the Son; nor the Son but the Father, and they to whom the Son will reveal Him.' Matthew 11:27 Accordingly He revealed to us all that we have perceived by His grace out of the Scriptures, so that we know Him to be the first-begotten of God, and to be before all creatures; likewise to be the Son of the patriarchs, since He assumed flesh by the Virgin of their family, and submitted to become a man without comeliness, dishonoured, and subject to suffering. Hence, also, among His words He said, when He was discoursing about His future sufferings: 'The Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the Pharisees and Scribes, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again.' Matthew 16:21 He said then that He was the Son of man, either because of His birth by the Virgin, who was, as I said, of the family of David and Jacob, and Isaac, and Abraham; or because Adam was the father both of Himself and of those who have been first enumerated from whom Mary derives her descent. For we know that the fathers of women are the fathers likewise of those children whom their daughters bear. For [Christ] called one of His disciples— previously known by the name of Simon — Peter; since he recognised Him to be Christ the Son of God, by the revelation of His Father: and since we find it recorded in the memoirs of His apostles that He is the Son of God, and since we call Him the Son, we have understood that He proceeded before all creatures from the Father by His power and will (for He is addressed in the writings of the prophets in one way or another as Wisdom, and the Day, and the East, and a Sword, and a Stone, and a Rod, and Jacob, and Israel); and that He became man by the Virgin, in order that the disobedience which proceeded from the serpent might receive its destruction in the same manner in which it derived its origin. For Eve, who was a virgin and undefiled, having conceived the word of the serpent, brought forth disobedience and death. But the Virgin Mary received faith and joy, when the angel Gabriel announced the good tidings to her that the Spirit of the Lord would come upon her, and the power of the Highest would overshadow her: wherefore also the Holy Thing begotten of her is the Son of God; and she replied, 'Be it unto me according to your word.' Luke 1:38 And by her has He been born, to whom we have proved so many Scriptures refer, and by whom God destroys both the serpent and those angels and men who are like him; but works deliverance from death to those who repent of their wickedness and believe upon Him.
7. Tertullian, On The Resurrection of The Flesh, 63 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

63. And so the flesh shall rise again, wholly in every man, in its own identity, in its absolute integrity. Wherever it may be, it is in safe keeping in God's presence, through that most faithful Mediator between God and man, (the man) Jesus Christ, 1 Timothy 2:5 who shall reconcile both God to man, and man to God; the spirit to the flesh, and the flesh to the spirit. Both natures has He already united in His own self; He has fitted them together as bride and bridegroom in the reciprocal bond of wedded life. Now, if any should insist on making the soul the bride, then the flesh will follow the soul as her dowry. The soul shall never be an outcast, to be had home by the bridegroom bare and naked. She has her dower, her outfit, her fortune in the flesh, which shall accompany her with the love and fidelity of a foster-sister. But suppose the flesh to be the bride, then in Christ Jesus she has in the contract of His blood received His Spirit as her spouse. Now, what you take to be her extinction, you may be sure is only her temporary retirement. It is not the soul only which withdraws from view. The flesh, too, has her departures for a while - in waters, in fires, in birds, in beasts; she may seem to be dissolved into these, but she is only poured into them, as into vessels. And should the vessels themselves afterwards fail to hold her, escaping from even these, and returning to her mother earth, she is absorbed once more, as it were, by its secret embraces, ultimately to stand forth to view, like Adam when summoned to hear from his Lord and Creator the words, Behold, the man has become as one of us! Genesis 3:22 - thoroughly knowing by that time the evil which she had escaped, and the good which she has acquired. Why, then, O soul, should you envy the flesh? There is none, after the Lord, whom you should love so dearly; none more like a brother to you, which is even born along with yourself in God. You ought rather to have been by your prayers obtaining resurrection for her: her sins, whatever they were, were owing to you. However, it is no wonder if you hate her; for you have repudiated her Creator. You have accustomed yourself either to deny or change her existence even in Christ - corrupting the very Word of God Himself, who became flesh, either by mutilating or misinterpreting the Scripture, and introducing, above all, apocryphal mysteries and blasphemous fables. But yet Almighty God, in His most gracious providence, by pouring out of His Spirit in these last days, upon all flesh, upon His servants and on His handmaidens, has checked these impostures of unbelief and perverseness, reanimated men's faltering faith in the resurrection of the flesh, and cleared from all obscurity and equivocation the ancient Scriptures (of both God's Testaments ) by the clear light of their (sacred) words and meanings. Now, since it was needful that there should be heresies, in order that they which are approved might be made manifest; 1 Corinthians 11:19 since, however, these heresies would be unable to put on a bold front without some countece from the Scriptures, it therefore is plain enough that the ancient Holy Writ has furnished them with sundry materials for their evil doctrine, which very materials indeed (so distorted) are refutable from the same Scriptures. It was fit and proper, therefore, that the Holy Ghost should no longer withhold the effusions of His gracious light upon these inspired writings, in order that they might be able to disseminate the seeds of truth with no admixture of heretical subtleties, and pluck out from it their tares. He has accordingly now dispersed all the perplexities of the past, and their self-chosen allegories and parables, by the open and perspicuous explanation of the entire mystery, through the new prophecy, which descends in copious streams from the Paraclete. If you will only draw water from His fountains, you will never thirst for other doctrine: no feverish craving after subtle questions will again consume you; but by drinking in evermore the resurrection of the flesh, you will be satisfied with the refreshing draughts.
8. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 3.31.4, 3.37.1, 4.3.2, 4.23.2-4.23.3, 4.27, 5.16, 5.16.1, 5.16.3-5.16.4, 5.16.7, 5.16.10, 5.16.12-5.16.15, 5.16.17-5.16.18, 5.17.1-5.17.3, 5.18.4-5.18.11, 5.19.2-5.19.3 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

3.31.4. So much concerning their death. And in the Dialogue of Caius which we mentioned a little above, Proclus, against whom he directed his disputation, in agreement with what has been quoted, speaks thus concerning the death of Philip and his daughters: After him there were four prophetesses, the daughters of Philip, at Hierapolis in Asia. Their tomb is there and the tomb of their father. Such is his statement. 3.37.1. Among those that were celebrated at that time was Quadratus, who, report says, was renowned along with the daughters of Philip for his prophetical gifts. And there were many others besides these who were known in those days, and who occupied the first place among the successors of the apostles. And they also, being illustrious disciples of such great men, built up the foundations of the churches which had been laid by the apostles in every place, and preached the Gospel more and more widely and scattered the saving seeds of the kingdom of heaven far and near throughout the whole world. 4.3.2. He himself reveals the early date at which he lived in the following words: But the works of our Saviour were always present, for they were genuine: — those that were healed, and those that were raised from the dead, who were seen not only when they were healed and when they were raised, but were also always present; and not merely while the Saviour was on earth, but also after his death, they were alive for quite a while, so that some of them lived even to our day. Such then was Quadratus. 4.23.2. Among these is the one addressed to the Lacedaemonians, containing instruction in the orthodox faith and an admonition to peace and unity; the one also addressed to the Athenians, exciting them to faith and to the life prescribed by the Gospel, which he accuses them of esteeming lightly, as if they had almost apostatized from the faith since the martyrdom of their ruler Publius, which had taken place during the persecutions of those days. 4.23.3. He mentions Quadratus also, stating that he was appointed their bishop after the martyrdom of Publius, and testifying that through his zeal they were brought together again and their faith revived. He records, moreover, that Dionysius the Areopagite, who was converted to the faith by the apostle Paul, according to the statement in the Acts of the Apostles, first obtained the episcopate of the church at Athens. 5.16.1. Against the so-called Phrygian heresy, the power which always contends for the truth raised up a strong and invincible weapon, Apolinarius of Hierapolis, whom we have mentioned before, and with him many other men of ability, by whom abundant material for our history has been left. 5.16.3. He commences his work in this manner:Having for a very long and sufficient time, O beloved Avircius Marcellus, been urged by you to write a treatise against the heresy of those who are called after Miltiades, I have hesitated till the present time, not through lack of ability to refute the falsehood or bear testimony for the truth, but from fear and apprehension that I might seem to some to be making additions to the doctrines or precepts of the Gospel of the New Testament, which it is impossible for one who has chosen to live according to the Gospel, either to increase or to diminish. 5.16.4. But being recently in Ancyra in Galatia, I found the church there greatly agitated by this novelty, not prophecy, as they call it, but rather false prophecy, as will be shown. Therefore, to the best of our ability, with the Lord's help, we disputed in the church many days concerning these and other matters separately brought forward by them, so that the church rejoiced and was strengthened in the truth, and those of the opposite side were for the time confounded, and the adversaries were grieved. 5.16.7. There is said to be a certain village called Ardabau in that part of Mysia, which borders upon Phrygia. There first, they say, when Gratus was proconsul of Asia, a recent convert, Montanus by name, through his unquenchable desire for leadership, gave the adversary opportunity against him. And he became beside himself, and being suddenly in a sort of frenzy and ecstasy, he raved, and began to babble and utter strange things, prophesying in a manner contrary to the constant custom of the Church handed down by tradition from the beginning. 5.16.10. For the faithful in Asia met often in many places throughout Asia to consider this matter, and examined the novel utterances and pronounced them profane, and rejected the heresy, and thus these persons were expelled from the Church and debarred from communion. 5.16.12. Since, therefore, they called us slayers of the prophets because we did not receive their loquacious prophets, who, they say, are those that the Lord promised to send to the people, let them answer as in God's presence: Who is there, O friends, of these who began to talk, from Montanus and the women down, that was persecuted by the Jews, or slain by lawless men? None. Or has any of them been seized and crucified for the Name? Truly not. Or has one of these women ever been scourged in the synagogues of the Jews, or stoned? No; never anywhere. 5.16.13. But by another kind of death Montanus and Maximilla are said to have died. For the report is that, incited by the spirit of frenzy, they both hung themselves; not at the same time, but at the time which common report gives for the death of each. And thus they died, and ended their lives like the traitor Judas. 5.16.14. So also, as general report says, that remarkable person, the first steward, as it were, of their so-called prophecy, one Theodotus — who, as if at sometime taken up and received into heaven, fell into trances, and entrusted himself to the deceitful spirit — was pitched like a quoit, and died miserably. 5.16.15. They say that these things happened in this manner. But as we did not see them, O friend, we do not pretend to know. Perhaps in such a manner, perhaps not, Montanus and Theodotus and the above-mentioned woman died. 5.16.17. He writes as follows:And let not the spirit, in the same work of Asterius Urbanus, say through Maximilla, 'I am driven away from the sheep like a wolf. I am not a wolf. I am word and spirit and power.' But let him show clearly and prove the power in the spirit. And by the spirit let him compel those to confess him who were then present for the purpose of proving and reasoning with the talkative spirit, — those eminent men and bishops, Zoticus, from the village Comana, and Julian, from Apamea, whose mouths the followers of Themiso muzzled, refusing to permit the false and seductive spirit to be refuted by them. 5.16.18. Again in the same work, after saying other things in refutation of the false prophecies of Maximilla, he indicates the time when he wrote these accounts, and mentions her predictions in which she prophesied wars and anarchy. Their falsehood he censures in the following manner: 5.17.1. In this work he mentions a writer, Miltiades, stating that he also wrote a certain book against the above-mentioned heresy. After quoting some of their words, he adds:Having found these things in a certain work of theirs in opposition to the work of the brother Alcibiades, in which he shows that a prophet ought not to speak in ecstasy, I made an abridgment. 5.17.2. A little further on in the same work he gives a list of those who prophesied under the new covet, among whom he enumerates a certain Ammia and Quadratus, saying:But the false prophet falls into an ecstasy, in which he is without shame or fear. Beginning with purposed ignorance, he passes on, as has been stated, to involuntary madness of soul. 5.17.3. They cannot show that one of the old or one of the new prophets was thus carried away in spirit. Neither can they boast of Agabus, or Judas, or Silas, or the daughters of Philip, or Ammia in Philadelphia, or Quadratus, or any others not belonging to them. 5.18.4. Afterwards he says: Does not all Scripture seem to you to forbid a prophet to receive gifts and money? When therefore I see the prophetess receiving gold and silver and costly garments, how can I avoid reproving her? 5.18.5. And again a little farther on he speaks thus concerning one of their confessors:So also Themiso, who was clothed with plausible covetousness, could not endure the sign of confession, but threw aside bonds for an abundance of possessions. Yet, though he should have been humble on this account, he dared to boast as a martyr, and in imitation of the apostle, he wrote a certain catholic epistle, to instruct those whose faith was better than his own, contending for words of empty sound, and blaspheming against the Lord and the apostles and the holy Church. 5.18.6. And again concerning others of those honored among them as martyrs, he writes as follows:Not to speak of many, let the prophetess herself tell us of Alexander, who called himself a martyr, with whom she is in the habit of banqueting, and who is worshipped by many. We need not mention his robberies and other daring deeds for which he was punished, but the archives contain them. 5.18.7. Which of these forgives the sins of the other? Does the prophet the robberies of the martyr, or the martyr the covetousness of the prophet? For although the Lord said, 'Provide neither gold, nor silver, neither two coats,' these men, in complete opposition, transgress in respect to the possession of the forbidden things. For we will show that those whom they call prophets and martyrs gather their gain not only from rich men, but also from the poor, and orphans, and widows. But if they are confident, let them stand up and discuss these matters, that if convicted they may hereafter cease transgressing. For the fruits of the prophet must be tried; 'for the tree is known by its fruit.' 5.18.9. But that those who wish may know concerning Alexander, he was tried by Aemilius Frontinus, proconsul at Ephesus; not on account of the Name, but for the robberies which he had committed, being already an apostate. Afterwards, having falsely declared for the name of the Lord, he was released, having deceived the faithful that were there. And his own parish, from which he came, did not receive him, because he was a robber. Those who wish to learn about him have the public records of Asia. And yet the prophet with whom he spent many years knows nothing about him! Exposing him, through him we expose also the pretense of the prophet. We could show the same thing of many others. But if they are confident, let them endure the test. 5.18.11. Again, in another part of his work he speaks as follows of the prophets of whom they boast:If they deny that their prophets have received gifts, let them acknowledge this: that if they are convicted of receiving them, they are not prophets. And we will bring a multitude of proofs of this. But it is necessary that all the fruits of a prophet should be examined. Tell me, does a prophet dye his hair? Does a prophet stain his eyelids? Does a prophet delight in adornment? Does a prophet play with tables and dice? Does a prophet lend on usury? Let them confess whether these things are lawful or not; but I will show that they have been done by them. 5.19.2. That you may see that the doings of this lying band of the new prophecy, so called, are an abomination to all the brotherhood throughout the world, I have sent you writings of the most blessed Claudius Apolinarius, bishop of Hierapolis in Asia. 5.19.3. In the same letter of Serapion the signatures of several bishops are found, one of whom subscribes himself as follows:I, Aurelius Cyrenius, a witness, pray for your health.And another in this manner:Aelius Publius Julius, bishop of Debeltum, a colony in Thrace. As God lives in the heavens, the blessed Sotas in Anchialus desired to cast the demon out of Priscilla, but the hypocrites did not permit him. And the autograph signatures of many other bishops who agreed with them are contained in the same letter.So much for these persons.
9. Epiphanius, Panarion, 48.13 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

10. Philastrius of Brescia, Diversarum Hereseon Liber, 49 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actian era Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
acts of the apostles Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 262
agabus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 262; Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 139
against the montanists Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 262
ammia of philadelphia Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153, 199, 262
ancyra (ankara), montanism at Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 139
anonymous (anti-montanist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5, 138, 139
anti-phrygian (anti-montanist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 139
apocalypse of john, letter to philadelphia Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
apocalypse of john, letter to thyatira Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
apocalypse of john Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
apollinarius of hierapolis Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 262
apollonius (anti-montanist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 139
apostle/s Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 139
ardabau, place of origin of montanism Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 936
ardabau Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5
asia (province) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
asia minor Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138
avircius marcellus Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5, 139
bayliss, richard Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14
bishops, publius Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14
bishops, quadratus Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14
borders / boundaries Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
christian, belief/faith Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14
christians, martyrs Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14
christians, persecution Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14
church councils/gatherings(anti-montanist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5
cogamus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153, 262
communication Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
corinth Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
daughters of philip Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199, 262; Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138, 139
dionysius, of corinth Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14
ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138
ecstasy Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153, 199
ephesus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
eusebius of caesarea Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
festivals Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
galatia Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
gender Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
hadrian Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14
hanna Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
hermus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153, 199, 262
homonoia coinage Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
ignatius of antioch Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
jerusalem Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
jezebel Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
judas barsa(b)bas Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 262
laodicea combusta Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
luke (gospel) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
lydia (also province) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 262
marcus aurelius Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14
maximilla Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5, 138, 139
meander Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
miltiades (phrygian montanist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5
montanism, geographic expansion Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 936
montanism, nature of Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 936
montanism, place of origin Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 936
montanism Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153, 199, 262; Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
montanus Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5, 138, 139
nympha (col) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
paul Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
paul (apostle) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14; Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 139
persians Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
philadelphia Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153, 199
philadelphia (ala\x06ehir) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138
philip (evangelist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 139
phrygia, montanism in Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5, 138
phrygia Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 262; Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5
prayer Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
prisca/priscilla Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5, 138, 139
proclus (roman montanist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138
prophecy Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
prophetess, prophetesses Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5, 138, 139
prophetic successio Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138, 139
prophets, prophecy Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153, 199
quadratus Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 14; Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 262
quadratus (apologist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138
quadratus (prophet) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138, 139
revelation Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
roads Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 153
rome (roma), montanism at xxx Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138, 139
seniores laici Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138
silas Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 262; Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 139
spirit Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
suicide Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 5
syntagma by justin Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
tertullian Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138
thyatira Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199
tripolis (apollonia, antoniopolis) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 262
women Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 199, 262
women and montanism xxix, xxxv' Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 138
women and montanism xxix, xxxv Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 139