Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5662
Eusebius Of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.27


nanA number of works of Apolinarius have been preserved by many, and the following have reached us: the Discourse addressed to the above-mentioned emperor, five books Against the Greeks, On Truth, a first and second book, and those which he subsequently wrote against the heresy of the Phrygians, which not long afterwards came out with its innovations, but at that time was, as it were, in its incipiency, since Montanus, with his false prophetesses, was then laying the foundations of his error.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. New Testament, Apocalypse, 3.7-3.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.7. To the angel of the assembly in Philadelphia write: "He who is holy, he who is true, he who has the key of David, he who opens and no one can shut, and that shuts and no one opens, says these things: 3.8. I know your works (behold, I have set before you an open door, which no one can shut), that you have a little power, and kept my word, and didn't deny my name. 3.9. Behold, I give of the synagogue of Satan, of those who say they are Jews, and they are not, but lie. Behold, I will make them to come and worship before your feet, and to know that I have loved you. 3.10. Because you kept the word of my patience, I also will keep you from the hour of testing, that which is to come on the whole world, to test those who dwell on the earth. 3.11. I come quickly. Hold firmly that which you have, so that no one takes your crown. 3.12. He who overcomes, I will make him a pillar in the temple of my God, and he will go out from there no more. I will write on him the name of my God, and the name of the city of my God, the new Jerusalem, which comes down out of heaven from my God, and my own new name. 3.13. He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the assemblies.
2. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.21, 4.26, 4.26.2-4.26.14, 5.16, 5.16.1, 5.16.4, 5.17.1, 5.17.4-5.17.5, 5.19.1-5.19.3 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4.26.2. The following works of these writers have come to our knowledge. of Melito, the two books On the Passover, and one On the Conduct of Life and the Prophets, the discourse On the Church, and one On the Lord's Day, still further one On the Faith of Man, and one On his Creation, another also On the Obedience of Faith, and one On the Senses; besides these the work On the Soul and Body, and that On Baptism, and the one On Truth, and On the Creation and Generation of Christ; his discourse also On Prophecy, and that On Hospitality; still further, The Key, and the books On the Devil and the Apocalypse of John, and the work On the Corporeality of God, and finally the book addressed to Antoninus. 4.26.3. In the books On the Passover he indicates the time at which he wrote, beginning with these words: While Servilius Paulus was proconsul of Asia, at the time when Sagaris suffered martyrdom, there arose in Laodicea a great strife concerning the Passover, which fell according to rule in those days; and these were written. 4.26.4. And Clement of Alexandria refers to this work in his own discourse On the Passover, which, he says, he wrote on occasion of Melito's work. 4.26.5. But in his book addressed to the emperor he records that the following events happened to us under him: For, what never before happened, the race of the pious is now suffering persecution, being driven about in Asia by new decrees. For the shameless informers and coveters of the property of others, taking occasion from the decrees, openly carry on robbery night and day, despoiling those who are guilty of no wrong. And a little further on he says: If these things are done by your command, well and good. For a just ruler will never take unjust measures; and we indeed gladly accept the honor of such a death. 4.26.6. But this request alone we present to you, that you would yourself first examine the authors of such strife, and justly judge whether they be worthy of death and punishment, or of safety and quiet. But if, on the other hand, this counsel and this new decree, which is not fit to be executed even against barbarian enemies, be not from you, much more do we beseech you not to leave us exposed to such lawless plundering by the populace. 4.26.7. Again he adds the following: For our philosophy formerly flourished among the Barbarians; but having sprung up among the nations under your rule, during the great reign of your ancestor Augustus, it became to your empire especially a blessing of auspicious omen. For from that time the power of the Romans has grown in greatness and splendor. To this power you have succeeded, as the desired possessor, and such shall you continue with your son, if you guard the philosophy which grew up with the empire and which came into existence with Augustus; that philosophy which your ancestors also honored along with the other religions. 4.26.8. And a most convincing proof that our doctrine flourished for the good of an empire happily begun, is this — that there has no evil happened since Augustus' reign, but that, on the contrary, all things have been splendid and glorious, in accordance with the prayers of all. 4.26.9. Nero and Domitian, alone, persuaded by certain calumniators, have wished to slander our doctrine, and from them it has come to pass that the falsehood has been handed down, in consequence of an unreasonable practice which prevails of bringing slanderous accusations against the Christians. 4.26.10. But your pious fathers corrected their ignorance, having frequently rebuked in writing many who dared to attempt new measures against them. Among them your grandfather Hadrian appears to have written to many others, and also to Fundanus, the proconsul and governor of Asia. And your father, when you also were ruling with him, wrote to the cities, forbidding them to take any new measures against us; among the rest to the Larissaeans, to the Thessalonians, to the Athenians, and to all the Greeks. 4.26.11. And as for you — since your opinions respecting the Christians are the same as theirs, and indeed much more benevolent and philosophic — we are the more persuaded that you will do all that we ask of you. These words are found in the above-mentioned work. 4.26.12. But in the Extracts made by him the same writer gives at the beginning of the introduction a catalogue of the acknowledged books of the Old Testament, which it is necessary to quote at this point. He writes as follows: 4.26.13. Melito to his brother Onesimus, greeting: Since you have often, in your zeal for the word, expressed a wish to have extracts made from the Law and the Prophets concerning the Saviour and concerning our entire faith, and has also desired to have an accurate statement of the ancient book, as regards their number and their order, I have endeavored to perform the task, knowing your zeal for the faith, and your desire to gain information in regard to the word, and knowing that you, in your yearning after God, esteem these things above all else, struggling to attain eternal salvation. 4.26.14. Accordingly when I went East and came to the place where these things were preached and done, I learned accurately the books of the Old Testament, and send them to you as written below. Their names are as follows: of Moses, five books: Genesis, Exodus, Numbers, Leviticus, Deuteronomy; Jesus Nave, Judges, Ruth; of Kings, four books; of Chronicles, two; the Psalms of David, the Proverbs of Solomon, Wisdom also, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Job; of Prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah; of the twelve prophets, one book ; Daniel, Ezekiel, Esdras. From which also I have made the extracts, dividing them into six books. Such are the words of Melito. 5.16.1. Against the so-called Phrygian heresy, the power which always contends for the truth raised up a strong and invincible weapon, Apolinarius of Hierapolis, whom we have mentioned before, and with him many other men of ability, by whom abundant material for our history has been left. 5.16.4. But being recently in Ancyra in Galatia, I found the church there greatly agitated by this novelty, not prophecy, as they call it, but rather false prophecy, as will be shown. Therefore, to the best of our ability, with the Lord's help, we disputed in the church many days concerning these and other matters separately brought forward by them, so that the church rejoiced and was strengthened in the truth, and those of the opposite side were for the time confounded, and the adversaries were grieved. 5.17.1. In this work he mentions a writer, Miltiades, stating that he also wrote a certain book against the above-mentioned heresy. After quoting some of their words, he adds:Having found these things in a certain work of theirs in opposition to the work of the brother Alcibiades, in which he shows that a prophet ought not to speak in ecstasy, I made an abridgment. 5.17.4. And again after a little he says: For if after Quadratus and Ammia in Philadelphia, as they assert, the women with Montanus received the prophetic gift, let them show who among them received it from Montanus and the women. For the apostle thought it necessary that the prophetic gift should continue in all the Church until the final coming. But they cannot show it, though this is the fourteenth year since the death of Maximilla. 5.17.5. He writes thus. But the Miltiades to whom he refers has left other monuments of his own zeal for the Divine Scriptures, in the discourses which he composed against the Greeks and against the Jews, answering each of them separately in two books. And in addition he addresses an apology to the earthly rulers, in behalf of the philosophy which he embraced. 5.19.1. Serapion, who, as report says, succeeded Maximinus at that time as bishop of the church of Antioch, mentions the works of Apolinarius against the above-mentioned heresy. And he alludes to him in a private letter to Caricus and Pontius, in which he himself exposes the same heresy, and adds the following words: 5.19.2. That you may see that the doings of this lying band of the new prophecy, so called, are an abomination to all the brotherhood throughout the world, I have sent you writings of the most blessed Claudius Apolinarius, bishop of Hierapolis in Asia. 5.19.3. In the same letter of Serapion the signatures of several bishops are found, one of whom subscribes himself as follows:I, Aurelius Cyrenius, a witness, pray for your health.And another in this manner:Aelius Publius Julius, bishop of Debeltum, a colony in Thrace. As God lives in the heavens, the blessed Sotas in Anchialus desired to cast the demon out of Priscilla, but the hypocrites did not permit him. And the autograph signatures of many other bishops who agreed with them are contained in the same letter.So much for these persons.
3. Philastrius of Brescia, Diversarum Hereseon Liber, 49 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4. Theodoret of Cyrus, Compendium Against Heresies, 1.21, 3.2 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
against the hellenes Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 237, 238, 242
against the jews Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
against the montanists Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238, 242, 256
antioch (syria) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 256
apollinarius of hierapolis Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233, 237, 238, 241, 242, 256
apologists, generally Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 526
apology Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 237, 238, 241, 242
apostolic fathers, generally Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 520
ardabau, place of origin of montanism Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 936
aristides Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
asia Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
athenagoras Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
bishop Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 208
caricus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 256
cassius dio Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
chronicon paschale Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
commodus (emperor) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
communication Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
convergences (christian—pagan) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
corinth Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 237
dionysius of corinth Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 237
encratites, enkrateia Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
eusebius of caesarea Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 237, 238, 241, 242, 256
gladiatorial games Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
hadrian (emperor) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
hellenes Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 242
justin Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241, 242
legio xii fulminata Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
lucius verus (emperor) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
magic Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
marcus aurelius (emperor) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233, 237, 238, 241
melito of sardis Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 237, 241, 242, 256
miltiades Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 242, 256
montanism, geographic expansion Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 936
montanism, nature of Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 936
montanism, place of origin Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 936
montanism Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 237, 256
on piety Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
on the paschal feast Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
on truth Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
pagans Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 242
persecution (of christians) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
photius Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
polycarp, martyrdom Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 520
pontius Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 256
prayer Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
presbyter Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 208
prophetess' Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 208
quadi Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
quadratus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 241
rain / lightning miracle Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233, 237, 241
rhetoric Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
serapion of antioch Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 256
severus (encratite) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
synods Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 256
tatian Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238, 241, 242
tertullian Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
theodoret Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 238
tutelary deity (of kings, emperors) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 237
victory, military Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233, 237