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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5662
Eusebius Of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.25-4.26


nanPhilip who, as we learn from the words of Dionysius, was bishop of the parish of Gortyna, likewise wrote a most elaborate work against Marcion, as did also Irenaeus and Modestus. The last named has exposed the error of the man more clearly than the rest to the view of all. There are a number of others also whose works are still presented by a great many of the brethren.


nanIn those days also Melito, bishop of the parish in Sardis, and Apolinarius, bishop of Hierapolis, enjoyed great distinction. Each of them on his own part addressed apologies in behalf of the faith to the above-mentioned emperor of the Romans who was reigning at that time.,The following works of these writers have come to our knowledge. Of Melito, the two books On the Passover, and one On the Conduct of Life and the Prophets, the discourse On the Church, and one On the Lord's Day, still further one On the Faith of Man, and one On his Creation, another also On the Obedience of Faith, and one On the Senses; besides these the work On the Soul and Body, and that On Baptism, and the one On Truth, and On the Creation and Generation of Christ; his discourse also On Prophecy, and that On Hospitality; still further, The Key, and the books On the Devil and the Apocalypse of John, and the work On the Corporeality of God, and finally the book addressed to Antoninus.,In the books On the Passover he indicates the time at which he wrote, beginning with these words: While Servilius Paulus was proconsul of Asia, at the time when Sagaris suffered martyrdom, there arose in Laodicea a great strife concerning the Passover, which fell according to rule in those days; and these were written.,And Clement of Alexandria refers to this work in his own discourse On the Passover, which, he says, he wrote on occasion of Melito's work.,But in his book addressed to the emperor he records that the following events happened to us under him: For, what never before happened, the race of the pious is now suffering persecution, being driven about in Asia by new decrees. For the shameless informers and coveters of the property of others, taking occasion from the decrees, openly carry on robbery night and day, despoiling those who are guilty of no wrong. And a little further on he says: If these things are done by your command, well and good. For a just ruler will never take unjust measures; and we indeed gladly accept the honor of such a death.,But this request alone we present to you, that you would yourself first examine the authors of such strife, and justly judge whether they be worthy of death and punishment, or of safety and quiet. But if, on the other hand, this counsel and this new decree, which is not fit to be executed even against barbarian enemies, be not from you, much more do we beseech you not to leave us exposed to such lawless plundering by the populace.,Again he adds the following: For our philosophy formerly flourished among the Barbarians; but having sprung up among the nations under your rule, during the great reign of your ancestor Augustus, it became to your empire especially a blessing of auspicious omen. For from that time the power of the Romans has grown in greatness and splendor. To this power you have succeeded, as the desired possessor, and such shall you continue with your son, if you guard the philosophy which grew up with the empire and which came into existence with Augustus; that philosophy which your ancestors also honored along with the other religions.,And a most convincing proof that our doctrine flourished for the good of an empire happily begun, is this — that there has no evil happened since Augustus' reign, but that, on the contrary, all things have been splendid and glorious, in accordance with the prayers of all.,Nero and Domitian, alone, persuaded by certain calumniators, have wished to slander our doctrine, and from them it has come to pass that the falsehood has been handed down, in consequence of an unreasonable practice which prevails of bringing slanderous accusations against the Christians.,But your pious fathers corrected their ignorance, having frequently rebuked in writing many who dared to attempt new measures against them. Among them your grandfather Hadrian appears to have written to many others, and also to Fundanus, the proconsul and governor of Asia. And your father, when you also were ruling with him, wrote to the cities, forbidding them to take any new measures against us; among the rest to the Larissaeans, to the Thessalonians, to the Athenians, and to all the Greeks.,And as for you — since your opinions respecting the Christians are the same as theirs, and indeed much more benevolent and philosophic — we are the more persuaded that you will do all that we ask of you. These words are found in the above-mentioned work.,But in the Extracts made by him the same writer gives at the beginning of the introduction a catalogue of the acknowledged books of the Old Testament, which it is necessary to quote at this point. He writes as follows:,Melito to his brother Onesimus, greeting: Since you have often, in your zeal for the word, expressed a wish to have extracts made from the Law and the Prophets concerning the Saviour and concerning our entire faith, and has also desired to have an accurate statement of the ancient book, as regards their number and their order, I have endeavored to perform the task, knowing your zeal for the faith, and your desire to gain information in regard to the word, and knowing that you, in your yearning after God, esteem these things above all else, struggling to attain eternal salvation.,Accordingly when I went East and came to the place where these things were preached and done, I learned accurately the books of the Old Testament, and send them to you as written below. Their names are as follows: Of Moses, five books: Genesis, Exodus, Numbers, Leviticus, Deuteronomy; Jesus Nave, Judges, Ruth; of Kings, four books; of Chronicles, two; the Psalms of David, the Proverbs of Solomon, Wisdom also, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Job; of Prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah; of the twelve prophets, one book ; Daniel, Ezekiel, Esdras. From which also I have made the extracts, dividing them into six books. Such are the words of Melito.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, 9.2, 12.2, 13.1, 16.1, 17.2, 18.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.2. 2 Therefore when he was brought forward the Pro-Consul asked him if he were Polycarp, and when he admitted it he tried to persuade him to deny, saying: "Respect your age," and so forth, as they are accustomed to say: "Swear by the genius of Caesar, repent, say: `Away with the Atheists'"; but Polycarp, with a stern countece looked on all the crowd of lawless heathen in the arena, and waving his hand at them, he groaned and looked up to heaven and said: "Away with the Atheists. 12.2. 2 When this had been said by the herald, all the multitude of heathen and Jews living in Smyrna cried out with uncontrollable wrath and a loud shout: "This is the teacher of Asia, the father of the Christians, the destroyer of our Gods, who teaches many neither to offer sacrifice nor to worship." And when they said this, they cried out and asked Philip the Asiarch to let loose a lion on Polycarp. But he said he could not legally do this, since he had closed the Sports. 13.1. 1 These things then happened with so great speed, quicker than it takes to tell, and the crowd came together immediately, and prepared wood and faggots from the work-shops and baths and the Jews were extremely zealous, as is their custom, in assisting at this. 16.1. 1 At length the lawless men, seeing that his body could not be consumed by the fire, commanded an executioner to go up and stab him with a dagger, and when he did this, there came out a dove, and much blood, so that the fire was quenched and all the crowd marvelled that there was such a difference between the unbelievers and the elect. 17.2. 2 Therefore he put forward Niketas, the father of Herod, and the brother of Alce, to ask the Governor not to give his body, "Lest," he said, "they leave the crucified one and begin to worship this man." And they said this owing to the suggestions and pressure of the Jews, who also watched when we were going to take it from the fire, for they do not know that we shall not ever be able either to abandon Christ, who suffered for the salvation of those who are being saved in the whole world, the innocent for sinners, or to worship any other. 18.1. 1 When therefore the centurion saw the contentiousness caused by the Jews, he put the body in the midst, as was their custom, and burnt it.
2. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 9.12 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9.12. Inasmuch as (Elchasai) considers, then, that it would be an insult to reason that these mighty and ineffable mysteries should be trampled under foot, or that they should be committed to many, he advises that as valuable pearls Matthew 7:6 they should be preserved, expressing himself thus: Do not recite this account to all men, and guard carefully these precepts, because all men are not faithful, nor are all women straightforward. Books containing these (tenets), however, neither the wise men of the Egyptians secreted in shrines, nor did Pythagoras, a sage of the Greeks, conceal them there. For if at that time Elchasai had happened to live, what necessity would there be that Pythagoras, or Thales, or Solon, or the wise Plato, or even the rest of the sages of the Greeks, should become disciples of the Egyptian priests, when they could obtain possession of such and such wisdom from Alcibiades, as the most astonishing interpreter of that wretched Elchasai? The statements, therefore, that have been made for the purpose of attaining a knowledge of the madness of these, would seem sufficient for those endued with sound mind. And so it is, that it has not appeared expedient to quote more of their formularies, seeing that these are very numerous and ridiculous. Since, however, we have not omitted those practices that have risen up in our own day, and have not been silent as regards those prevalent before our time, it seems proper, in order that we may pass through all their systems, and leave nothing untold, to state what also are the (customs) of the Jews, and what are the diversities of opinion among them, for I imagine that these as yet remain behind for our consideration. Now, when I have broken silence on these points, I shall pass on to the demonstration of the Doctrine of the Truth, in order that, after the lengthened argumentative straggle against all heresies, we, devoutly pressing forward towards the kingdom's crown, and believing the truth, may not be unsettled.
3. Justin, First Apology, 16.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.97 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.97 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 30 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.15-4.18, 4.22-4.24, 4.26, 4.29, 4.36, 7.5.2 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

7.5.2. And all Syria, and Arabia to which you send help when needed, and whither you have just written, Mesopotamia, Pontus, Bithynia, and in short all everywhere are rejoicing and glorifying God for the uimity and brotherly love. Thus far Dionysius.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apelles, marcionite Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 251
apostolic fathers, generally Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 520
asia minor Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 250
baptism Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 251
basilides Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250
bishops Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 101, 251
business, commerce Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
care of the poor Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
catechumenate Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 251
claudius ephebus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
clement (author of 1 clement) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
clivus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
commodus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
community Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
concubinage Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
corinth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
dionysius of alexandria Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
dionysius of corinth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
educated, erudite Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101, 250, 251
elder (presbyter) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 251
eusebius Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
excommunication Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
flora Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250
freeborn Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
freedpersons (and their descendants), manumission Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
gnostics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250, 251
heretics {see also gnostics; marcionites) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250, 251
hippolytus (soon after Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 251
house community Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
humiliores Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 101
hyacinth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
ignatius Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
illiteracy Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
imperial court Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
imperial freedpersons Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
imperial slaves Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
justin Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101, 250
laborers, manual Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
marcia Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
marcion Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101, 250, 251
melito of sardis Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250
messengers, delegated Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
modestus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250
naukleros Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250, 251
navicularius Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250, 251
nero Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
networking, "connections, " Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
office, office holder Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 251
persecution, martyrs Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 101
phillip of gortyna Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250
philosophy Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
polycarp, martyrdom Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 520
possessions, wealth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101, 250, 251
proc(u)lus (possibly two persons) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 251
ptolemy (valentinian, teacher of justin, apol. Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 251
religion of redemption Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 251
religious background Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
rhodon Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250, 251
sardinia Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
schools Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 251
selling oneself into slavery Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
shipowners Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250, 251
simon magus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250
slaves, slavery Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 101
socially elevated Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 101, 250, 251
soter Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
stratification, social Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 101
syria, syrian Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
taxes, custom, duty Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
taxes Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
theophilus of antioch Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250
torture' "186.0_101.0@treasury (church's)" Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 101
valentinus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 250
victor' Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89