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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5662
Eusebius Of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.18.6


nanHe composed also a dialogue against the Jews, which he held in the city of Ephesus with Trypho, a most distinguished man among the Hebrews of that day. In it he shows how the divine grace urged him on to the doctrine of the faith, and with what earnestness he had formerly pursued philosophical studies, and how ardent a search he had made for the truth.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Cicero, Lucullus, 70 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. New Testament, 1 John, 2.22, 2.29 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.22. Who is the liar but he who denies that Jesus is the Christ? This is the Antichrist, he who denies the Father and the Son. 2.29. If you know that he is righteous, you know that everyone who practices righteousness is born of him.
3. New Testament, John, 1.45-1.46, 4.10-4.14, 7.18, 18.5, 18.7, 19.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.45. Philip found Nathanael, and said to him, "We have found him, of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, wrote: Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph. 1.46. Nathanael said to him, "Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?"Philip said to him, "Come and see. 4.10. Jesus answered her, "If you knew the gift of God, and who it is who says to you, 'Give me a drink,' you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water. 4.11. The woman said to him, "Sir, you have nothing to draw with, and the well is deep. From where then have you that living water? 4.12. Are you greater than our father, Jacob, who gave us the well, and drank of it himself, as did his sons, and his cattle? 4.13. Jesus answered her, "Everyone who drinks of this water will thirst again 4.14. but whoever drinks of the water that I will give him will never thirst again; but the water that I will give him will become in him a well of water springing up to eternal life. 7.18. He who speaks from himself seeks his own glory, but he who seeks the glory of him who sent him, the same is true, and no unrighteousness is in him. 18.5. They answered him, "Jesus of Nazareth."Jesus said to them, "I AM."Judas also, who betrayed him, was standing with them. 18.7. Again therefore he asked them, "Who are you looking for?"They said, "Jesus of Nazareth. 19.19. Pilate wrote a title also, and put it on the cross. There was written, "JESUS OF NAZARETH, THE KING OF THE JEWS.
4. Gellius, Attic Nights, 15.2.2, 15.2.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Hippolytus, Apostolic Tradition, 21, 20 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 3.1.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Justin, First Apology, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. And neither do we honour with many sacrifices and garlands of flowers such deities as men have formed and set in shrines and called gods; since we see that these are soulless and dead, and have not the form of God (for we do not consider that God has such a form as some say that they imitate to His honour), but have the names and forms of those wicked demons which have appeared. For why need we tell you who already know, into what forms the craftsmen, Isaiah 44:9-20; Jeremiah 10:3. carving and cutting, casting and hammering, fashion the materials? And often out of vessels of dishonour, by merely changing the form, and making an image of the requisite shape, they make what they call a god; which we consider not only senseless, but to be even insulting to God, who, having ineffable glory and form, thus gets His name attached to things that are corruptible, and require constant service. And that the artificers of these are both intemperate, and, not to enter into particulars, are practised in every vice, you very well know; even their own girls who work along with them they corrupt. What infatuation! That dissolute men should be said to fashion and make gods for your worship, and that you should appoint such men the guardians of the temples where they are enshrined; not recognising that it is unlawful even to think or say that men are the guardians of gods.
8. Justin, Second Apology, 13, 12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. For I myself, too, when I was delighting in the doctrines of Plato, and heard the Christians slandered, and saw them fearless of death, and of all other-things which are counted fearful, perceived that it was impossible that they could be living in wickedness and pleasure. For what sensual or intemperate man, or who that counts it good to feast on human flesh, could welcome death that he might be deprived of his enjoyments, and would not rather continue always the present life, and attempt to escape the observation of the rulers; and much less would he denounce himself when the consequence would be death? This also the wicked demons have now caused to be done by evil men. For having put some to death on account of the accusations falsely brought against us, they also dragged to the torture our domestics, either children or weak women, and by dreadful torments forced them to admit those fabulous actions which they themselves openly perpetrate; about which we are the less concerned, because none of these actions are really ours, and we have the unbegotten and ineffable God as witness both of our thoughts and deeds. For why did we not even publicly profess that these were the things which we esteemed good, and prove that these are the divine philosophy, saying that the mysteries of Saturn are performed when we slay a man, and that when we drink our fill of blood, as it is said we do, we are doing what you do before that idol you honour, and on which you sprinkle the blood not only of irrational animals, but also of men, making a libation of the blood of the slain by the hand of the most illustrious and noble man among you? And imitating Jupiter and the other gods in sodomy and shameless intercourse with woman, might we not bring as our apology the writings of Epicurus and the poets? But because we persuade men to avoid such instruction, and all who practise them and imitate such examples, as now in this discourse we have striven to persuade you, we are assailed in every kind of way. But we are not concerned, since we know that God is a just observer of all. But would that even now some one would mount a lofty rostrum, and shout with a loud voice; Be ashamed, be ashamed, you who charge the guiltless with those deeds which yourselves openly could commit, and ascribe things which apply to yourselves and to your gods to those who have not even the slightest sympathy with them. Be converted; become wise.
9. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 1.2, 2.1-2.6, 3.3, 5.6, 8.1-8.2, 16.2, 40.2, 46.2, 120.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 1.7 (2nd cent. CE

1.7. ON reaching the age when children are taught their letters, he showed great strength of memory and power of application; and his tongue affected the Attic dialect, nor was his accent corrupted by the race he lived among. All eyes were turned upon him, for he was, moreover, conspicuous for his beauty. When he reached his fourteenth year, his father brought him to Tarsus, to Euthydemus the teacher from Phoenicia. Now Euthydemus was a good rhetor, and began his education; but, though he was attached to his teacher, he found the atmosphere of the city harsh and strange and little conducive to the philosophic life, for nowhere are men more addicted than here to luxury; jesters and full of insolence are they all; and they attend more to their fine linen than the Athenians did to wisdom; and a stream called the Cydnus runs through their city, along the banks of which they sit like so many water-fowl. Hence the words which Apollonius addresses to them in his letter: Be done with getting drunk upon your water. He therefore transferred his teacher, with his father's consent, to the town of Aegae, which was close by, where he found a peace congenial to one who would be a philosopher, and a more serious school of study and a sanctuary of Asclepius, where that god reveals himself in person to men. There he had as his companions in philosophy followers of Plato and Chrysippus and peripatetic philosophers. And he diligently attended also to the discourses of Epicurus, for he did not despise these either, although it was to those of Pythagoras that he applied himself with unspeakable wisdom and ardor. However, his teacher of the Pythagorean system was not a very serious person, nor one who practiced in his conduct the philosophy he taught; for he was the slave of his belly and appetites, and modeled himself upon Epicurus. And this man was Euxenus from the town of Heraclea in Pontus, and he knew the principles of Pythagoras just as birds know what they learn from men; for the birds will wish you farewell, and say Good day or Zeus help you, and such like, without understanding what they say and without any real sympathy for mankind, merely because they have been trained to move their tongue in a certain manner. Apollonius, however, was like the young eagles who, as long as they are not fully fledged, fly alongside of their parents and are trained by them in flight, but who, as soon as they are able to rise in the air, outsoar the parent birds, especially when they perceive the latter to be greedy and to be flying along the ground in order to snuff the quarry; like them Apollonius attended Euxenus as long as he was a child and was guided by him in the path of argument, but when he reached his sixteenth year he indulged his impulse towards the life of Pythagoras, being fledged and winged thereto by some higher power. Notwithstanding he did not cease to love Euxenus, nay, he persuaded his father to present him with a villa outside the town, where there were tender groves and fountains, and he said to him: Now you live there your own life, but I will live that of Pythagoras.
11. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.17-1.19 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

12. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.16, 4.18.2, 4.18.7-4.18.8, 5.24.3, 6.14.7 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4.18.2. There is a certain discourse of his in defense of our doctrine addressed to Antoninus surnamed the Pious, and to his sons, and to the Roman senate. Another work contains his second Apology in behalf of our faith, which he offered to him who was the successor of the emperor mentioned and who bore the same name, Antoninus Verus, the one whose times we are now recording. 4.18.7. And he records of the Jews in the same work, that they were plotting against the teaching of Christ, asserting the same things against Trypho: Not only did you not repent of the wickedness which you had committed, but you selected at that time chosen men, and you sent them out from Jerusalem through all the land, to announce that the godless heresy of the Christians had made its appearance, and to accuse them of those things which all that are ignorant of us say against us, so that you become the causes not only of your own injustice, but also of all other men's. 4.18.8. He writes also that even down to his time prophetic gifts shone in the Church. And he mentions the Apocalypse of John, saying distinctly that it was the apostle's. He also refers to certain prophetic declarations, and accuses Trypho on the ground that the Jews had cut them out of the Scripture. A great many other works of his are still in the hands of many of the brethren. 5.24.3. He fell asleep at Ephesus. 6.14.7. When Peter learned of this, he neither directly forbade nor encouraged it. But, last of all, John, perceiving that the external facts had been made plain in the Gospel, being urged by his friends, and inspired by the Spirit, composed a spiritual Gospel. This is the account of Clement.
13. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 24.107, 28.150 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

14. Plotinus, Enneads, (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

15. Anon., Martyrdom of Justin, 3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of john Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185
age Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
alexandria Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
apocalypse of john, letter to laodicea Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185
aristotelianism, as school Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 45
artemis of ephesos Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185
asia minor Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
baptism, sethian Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
baptism Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
christianity, and greek/pagan religion Petropoulou, Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200 (2012) 217
city, civic life context/religion Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
corinth Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
demons Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
dialogue with trypho the jew Petropoulou, Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200 (2012) 217
dualism, material/immaterial Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
educated, erudite Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258
education, philosophical schools Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
ennoia Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
ephesos Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
ephesus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185; Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
epicur, epicurean views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
epicureanism, as school or sect Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43
eusebius of caesarea Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
god, direct contemplation of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258
graeco-roman culture Petropoulou, Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200 (2012) 217
groom Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
hairesis, as referring to philosophical schools Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 44, 45
hairesis, pre-christian use Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 44, 45
hairesis Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 45
identity Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
iesseus-mazareus-iessedekeus Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
irenaeus of lyon Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185
james (apostle) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185
jerusalem Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185
jesus, see also christ Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
john (apostle) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185
john (author of apocalypse) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185
justin, christian writer Petropoulou, Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200 (2012) 217
justin Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185; Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258
magic, magicians Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
martyr, justin, naming sects Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 44, 45
martyrologium, syriac Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 185
matter (hyle) Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 299
mind Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
nazareth/nazarene Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
palestine Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258; Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
perception Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
persecution, martyrs Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258
philosophical school Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 299
philosophy, origin of notion of αἵρεσις Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 44, 45
plato Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
platonism, as a label Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 44, 45
platonism, middle platonism Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 45
platonism Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258
plotinus Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
power Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
propaedeutic Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258
provincials, immigrants Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258
pythagoras, pythagorean views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
pythagoreans Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258
rhetoric Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
rome Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 299
salvation/soteriology Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
schools, philosophical Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 299
sethians, sethianism Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
stoicism, notion of a stoic school or αἵρεσις Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 45
syria, christianity in Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 299
syria Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
tatian Petropoulou, Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200 (2012) 217
trials' Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258
trypho, the jew Petropoulou, Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200 (2012) 217
trypho Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 299
water, baptismal/ritual Rasimus, Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence (2009) 276
wisdom Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 106
διατριβή Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 45