Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5662
Eusebius Of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 3.36.1


nanAt that time Polycarp, a disciple of the apostles, was a man of eminence in Asia, having been entrusted with the episcopate of the church of Smyrna by those who had seen and heard the Lord.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Ignatius, To The Romans, 5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Ignatius, To The Smyrnaeans, 3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Polycarp of Smyrna, Letter To The Philippians, 3.1-3.2, 4.1-4.3, 5.3, 6.1, 11.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, 9.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.3. 3 But when the Pro-Consul pressed him and said: "Take the oath and I let you go, revile Christ," Polycarp said: "For eighty and six years have I been his servant, and he has done me no wrong, and how can I blaspheme my King who saved me?
5. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 3.2.2, 3.3.2-3.3.4, 5.33.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 32 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 2.25.6, 3.36.3-3.36.11, 3.39.1, 3.39.4, 4.14.2-4.14.4, 4.14.6, 4.22.3, 5.20.4-5.20.8, 5.24.11-5.24.17 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.25.6. It is confirmed likewise by Caius, a member of the Church, who arose under Zephyrinus, bishop of Rome. He, in a published disputation with Proclus, the leader of the Phrygian heresy, speaks as follows concerning the places where the sacred corpses of the aforesaid apostles are laid: 3.36.3. Report says that he was sent from Syria to Rome, and became food for wild beasts on account of his testimony to Christ. 3.36.4. And as he made the journey through Asia under the strictest military surveillance, he fortified the parishes in the various cities where he stopped by oral homilies and exhortations, and warned them above all to be especially on their guard against the heresies that were then beginning to prevail, and exhorted them to hold fast to the tradition of the apostles. Moreover, he thought it necessary to attest that tradition in writing, and to give it a fixed form for the sake of greater security. 3.36.5. So when he came to Smyrna, where Polycarp was, he wrote an epistle to the church of Ephesus, in which he mentions Onesimus, its pastor; and another to the church of Magnesia, situated upon the Maeander, in which he makes mention again of a bishop Damas; and finally one to the church of Tralles, whose bishop, he states, was at that time Polybius. 3.36.6. In addition to these he wrote also to the church of Rome, entreating them not to secure his release from martyrdom, and thus rob him of his earnest hope. In confirmation of what has been said it is proper to quote briefly from this epistle. 3.36.7. He writes as follows: From Syria even unto Rome I fight with wild beasts, by land and by sea, by night and by day, being bound amidst ten leopards that is, a company of soldiers who only become worse when they are well treated. In the midst of their wrongdoings, however, I am more fully learning discipleship, but I am not thereby justified. 3.36.8. May I have joy of the beasts that are prepared for me; and I pray that I may find them ready; I will even coax them to devour me quickly that they may not treat me as they have some whom they have refused to touch through fear. And if they are unwilling, I will compel them. Forgive me. 3.36.9. I know what is expedient for me. Now do I begin to be a disciple. May nothing of things visible and things invisible envy me; that I may attain unto Jesus Christ. Let fire and cross and attacks of wild beasts, let wrenching of bones, cutting of limbs, crushing of the whole body, tortures of the devil — let all these come upon me if only I may attain unto Jesus Christ. 3.36.10. These things he wrote from the above-mentioned city to the churches referred to. And when he had left Smyrna he wrote again from Troas to the Philadelphians and to the church of Smyrna; and particularly to Polycarp, who presided over the latter church. And since he knew him well as an apostolic man, he commended to him, like a true and good shepherd, the flock at Antioch, and besought him to care diligently for it. 3.36.11. And the same man, writing to the Smyrnaeans, used the following words concerning Christ, taken I know not whence: But I know and believe that he was in the flesh after the resurrection. And when he came to Peter and his companions he said to them, Take, handle me, and see that I am not an incorporeal spirit. And immediately they touched him and believed. 3.39.1. There are extant five books of Papias, which bear the title Expositions of Oracles of the Lord. Irenaeus makes mention of these as the only works written by him, in the following words: These things are attested by Papias, an ancient man who was a hearer of John and a companion of Polycarp, in his fourth book. For five books have been written by him. These are the words of Irenaeus. 3.39.4. If, then, any one came, who had been a follower of the elders, I questioned him in regard to the words of the elders — what Andrew or what Peter said, or what was said by Philip, or by Thomas, or by James, or by John, or by Matthew, or by any other of the disciples of the Lord, and what things Aristion and the presbyter John, the disciples of the Lord, say. For I did not think that what was to be gotten from the books would profit me as much as what came from the living and abiding voice. 4.14.2. And the same writer gives another account of Polycarp which I feel constrained to add to that which has been already related in regard to him. The account is taken from the third book of Irenaeus' work Against Heresies, and is as follows: 4.22.3. And when I had come to Rome I remained there until Anicetus, whose deacon was Eleutherus. And Anicetus was succeeded by Soter, and he by Eleutherus. In every succession, and in every city that is held which is preached by the law and the prophets and the Lord. 5.20.4. In the letter to Florinus, of which we have spoken, Irenaeus mentions again his intimacy with Polycarp, saying:These doctrines, O Florinus, to speak mildly, are not of sound judgment. These doctrines disagree with the Church, and drive into the greatest impiety those who accept them. These doctrines, not even the heretics outside of the Church, have ever dared to publish. These doctrines, the presbyters who were before us, and who were companions of the apostles, did not deliver to you. 5.20.5. For when I was a boy, I saw you in lower Asia with Polycarp, moving in splendor in the royal court, and endeavoring to gain his approbation. 5.20.6. I remember the events of that time more clearly than those of recent years. For what boys learn, growing with their mind, becomes joined with it; so that I am able to describe the very place in which the blessed Polycarp sat as he discoursed, and his goings out and his comings in, and the manner of his life, and his physical appearance, and his discourses to the people, and the accounts which he gave of his intercourse with John and with the others who had seen the Lord. And as he remembered their words, and what he heard from them concerning the Lord, and concerning his miracles and his teaching, having received them from eyewitnesses of the 'Word of life,' Polycarp related all things in harmony with the Scriptures. 5.20.7. These things being told me by the mercy of God, I listened to them attentively, noting them down, not on paper, but in my heart. And continually, through God's grace, I recall them faithfully. And I am able to bear witness before God that if that blessed and apostolic presbyter had heard any such thing, he would have cried out, and stopped his ears, and as was his custom, would have exclaimed, O good God, unto what times have you spared me that I should endure these things? And he would have fled from the place where, sitting or standing, he had heard such words. 5.20.8. And this can be shown plainly from the letters which he sent, either to the neighboring churches for their confirmation, or to some of the brethren, admonishing and exhorting them. Thus far Irenaeus. 5.24.11. Among them was Irenaeus, who, sending letters in the name of the brethren in Gaul over whom he presided, maintained that the mystery of the resurrection of the Lord should be observed only on the Lord's day. He fittingly admonishes Victor that he should not cut off whole churches of God which observed the tradition of an ancient custom and after many other words he proceeds as follows: 5.24.12. For the controversy is not only concerning the day, but also concerning the very manner of the fast. For some think that they should fast one day, others two, yet others more; some, moreover, count their day as consisting of forty hours day and night. 5.24.13. And this variety in its observance has not originated in our time; but long before in that of our ancestors. It is likely that they did not hold to strict accuracy, and thus formed a custom for their posterity according to their own simplicity and peculiar mode. Yet all of these lived none the less in peace, and we also live in peace with one another; and the disagreement in regard to the fast confirms the agreement in the faith. 5.24.14. He adds to this the following account, which I may properly insert:Among these were the presbyters before Soter, who presided over the church which you now rule. We mean Anicetus, and Pius, and Hyginus, and Telesphorus, and Xystus. They neither observed it themselves, nor did they permit those after them to do so. And yet though not observing it, they were none the less at peace with those who came to them from the parishes in which it was observed; although this observance was more opposed to those who did not observe it. 5.24.15. But none were ever cast out on account of this form; but the presbyters before you who did not observe it, sent the eucharist to those of other parishes who observed it. 5.24.16. And when the blessed Polycarp was at Rome in the time of Anicetus, and they disagreed a little about certain other things, they immediately made peace with one another, not caring to quarrel over this matter. For neither could Anicetus persuade Polycarp not to observe what he had always observed with John the disciple of our Lord, and the other apostles with whom he had associated; neither could Polycarp persuade Anicetus to observe it as he said that he ought to follow the customs of the presbyters that had preceded him. 5.24.17. But though matters were in this shape, they communed together, and Anicetus conceded the administration of the eucharist in the church to Polycarp, manifestly as a mark of respect. And they parted from each other in peace, both those who observed, and those who did not, maintaining the peace of the whole church.
8. Origen, Homilies On Luke, 1 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antioch Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46; Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
antioch (syria) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213
apocrypha Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
asia minor Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
authenticity Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175, 178
authority Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
bishop Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213
christology Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
clergy Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213
collection of letters Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175, 178
community Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175, 178
cyprian Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
dating Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
deacon/deaconess Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97
demosthenes Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
dionysius of corinth Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
ephesus Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
epigram Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
episkopos Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
eusebius (of caesarea) Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
eusebius of caesarea Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213; Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
evodius Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
forgery Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
fragment Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
gnosticism, polemic against Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 200
hegesippus Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
hierarchy (clerical) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213
ignatius of antioch Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46; Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213; Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175, 178
interpolation Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
irenaeus of lyon Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213; Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175, 178
irenaeus of lyons Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
isocrates Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
justin martyr Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
magnesia Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
martyrdom Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175, 178
origen Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
papias Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213
paul Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
paul (apostle) Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97
peter (apostle) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213
philadelphia Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
philippi, christian community Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97
philosopher Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
polycarp, as a teacher Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 200
polycarp Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175, 178; Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97
polycarp of smyrna Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213
popes (roman), anicetus Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
presbyter/πρεσβύτερος Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97
primacy Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
pseudepigraphy Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
relationship (interpersonal) Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
repetition Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
rhetorician Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
rome Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
sender Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
smyrna Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213; Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175, 178
tertullian Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
time (temporality) Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
trajan Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
trajan (emperor) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 213
tralles Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
transmission (of text) Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175, 178
troas Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 175
tropaia Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
unity/disunity' Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
vatican hill Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
via appia Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
virgin Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97