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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5660
Eusebius Of Caesarea, Demonstration Of The Gospel, 1.1.12
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

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1. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 10.89 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 6.19.4, 6.19.10 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

6.19.4. Some persons, desiring to find a solution of the baseness of the Jewish Scriptures rather than abandon them, have had recourse to explanations inconsistent and incongruous with the words written, which explanations, instead of supplying a defense of the foreigners, contain rather approval and praise of themselves. For they boast that the plain words of Moses are enigmas, and regard them as oracles full of hidden mysteries; and having bewildered the mental judgment by folly, they make their explanations. Farther on he says: 6.19.10. For the doctrine of Christ was taught to Origen by his parents, as we have shown above. And Ammonius held the divine philosophy unshaken and unadulterated to the end of his life. His works yet extant show this, as he is celebrated among many for the writings which he has left. For example, the work entitled The Harmony of Moses and Jesus, and such others as are in the possession of the learned.
3. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 1.1.12, 1.2.1-1.2.3 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4. Origen, Against Celsus, 1.9, 3.39 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.9. He next proceeds to recommend, that in adopting opinions we should follow reason and a rational guide, since he who assents to opinions without following this course is very liable to be deceived. And he compares inconsiderate believers to Metragyrt, and soothsayers, and Mithr, and Sabbadians, and to anything else that one may fall in with, and to the phantoms of Hecate, or any other demon or demons. For as among such persons are frequently to be found wicked men, who, taking advantage of the ignorance of those who are easily deceived, lead them away whither they will, so also, he says, is the case among Christians. And he asserts that certain persons who do not wish either to give or receive a reason for their belief, keep repeating, Do not examine, but believe! and, Your faith will save you! And he alleges that such also say, The wisdom of this life is bad, but that foolishness is a good thing! To which we have to answer, that if it were possible for all to leave the business of life, and devote themselves to philosophy, no other method ought to be adopted by any one, but this alone. For in the Christian system also it will be found that there is, not to speak at all arrogantly, at least as much of investigation into articles of belief, and of explanation of dark sayings, occurring in the prophetical writings, and of the parables in the Gospels, and of countless other things, which either were narrated or enacted with a symbolic signification, (as is the case with other systems). But since the course alluded to is impossible, partly on account of the necessities of life, partly on account of the weakness of men, as only a very few individuals devote themselves earnestly to study, what better method could be devised with a view of assisting the multitude, than that which was delivered by Jesus to the heathen? And let us inquire, with respect to the great multitude of believers, who have washed away the mire of wickedness in which they formerly wallowed, whether it were better for them to believe without a reason, and (so) to have become reformed and improved in their habits, through the belief that men are chastised for sins, and honoured for good works or not to have allowed themselves to be converted on the strength of mere faith, but (to have waited) until they could give themselves to a thorough examination of the (necessary) reasons. For it is manifest that, (on such a plan), all men, with very few exceptions, would not obtain this (amelioration of conduct) which they have obtained through a simple faith, but would continue to remain in the practice of a wicked life. Now, whatever other evidence can be furnished of the fact, that it was not without divine intervention that the philanthropic scheme of Christianity was introduced among men, this also must be added. For a pious man will not believe that even a physician of the body, who restores the sick to better health, could take up his abode in any city or country without divine permission, since no good happens to men without the help of God. And if he who has cured the bodies of many, or restored them to better health, does not effect his cures without the help of God, how much more He who has healed the souls of many, and has turned them (to virtue), and improved their nature, and attached them to God who is over all things, and taught them to refer every action to His good pleasure, and to shun all that is displeasing to Him, even to the least of their words or deeds, or even of the thoughts of their hearts? 3.39. We must notice the remarks which Celsus next makes, when he says to us, that faith, having taken possession of our minds, makes us yield the assent which we give to the doctrine of Jesus; for of a truth it is faith which does produce such an assent. Observe, however, whether that faith does not of itself exhibit what is worthy of praise, seeing we entrust ourselves to the God who is over all, acknowledging our gratitude to Him who has led us to such a faith, and declaring that He could not have attempted or accomplished such a result without the divine assistance. And we have confidence also in the intentions of the writers of the Gospels, observing their piety and conscientiousness, manifested in their writings, which contain nothing that is spurious, or deceptive, or false, or cunning; for it is evident to us that souls unacquainted with those artifices which are taught by the cunning sophistry of the Greeks (which is characterized by great plausibility and acuteness), and by the kind of rhetoric in vogue in the courts of justice, would not have been able thus to invent occurrences which are fitted of themselves to conduct to faith, and to a life in keeping with faith. And I am of opinion that it was on this account that Jesus wished to employ such persons as teachers of His doctrines, viz., that there might be no ground for any suspicion of plausible sophistry, but that it might clearly appear to all who were capable of understanding, that the guileless purpose of the writers being, so to speak, marked with great simplicity, was deemed worthy of being accompanied by a diviner power, which accomplished far more than it seemed possible could be accomplished by a periphrasis of words, and a weaving of sentences, accompanied by all the distinctions of Grecian art.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aristotle Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
celsus Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
christianity Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 142
clement of alexandria Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
epicureans Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
eusebius Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
eusebius of caesarea Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 142
gospel Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 142
jewish Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
jews Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 142
judaism Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 142
origen Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
pagan/paganism Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
plato Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
porphyry Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
prologue Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 142
skeptics/sceptics Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172
teaching (διδασκαλία)' Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 142
theology, metaphysics Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 172