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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5642
Euripides, Trojan Women, 887-1000


ἀνωλόλυξας — Κάστορος νεανίουdid you ever raise, though Castor was still alive, a vigorous youth, and his brother also, not yet among the stars? Then when you had come to Troy , and the Argives were on your track, and the mortal combat had begun, whenever tidings came to you of


προσηυξάμην σε: πάντα γὰρ δι' ἀψόφουwhoever you are, a riddle past our knowledge! Zeus, owhether you are natural necessity, or man’s intellect, to you I pray; for, though you tread over a noiseless path, all your dealings with mankind are guided by justice. Menelau


βαίνων κελεύθου κατὰ δίκην τὰ θνήτ' ἄγεις.whoever you are, a riddle past our knowledge! Zeus, owhether you are natural necessity, or man’s intellect, to you I pray; for, though you tread over a noiseless path, all your dealings with mankind are guided by justice. Menelau


τί δ' ἔστιν; εὐχὰς ὡς ἐκαίνισας θεῶν.What is this? Strange the prayer you offer to the gods! Hecuba


αἰνῶ σε, Μενέλα', εἰ κτενεῖς δάμαρτα σήν.I thank you, Menelaus, if you will slay that wife of yours. Yet shun the sight of her, lest she strike you with longing. For she ensnares the eyes of men, overthrows their towns, and burns their houses, so potent are her witcheries! Well I know her; so do you and those her victims too. Helen


ὁρᾶν δὲ τήνδε φεῦγε, μή ς' ἕλῃ πόθῳ.I thank you, Menelaus, if you will slay that wife of yours. Yet shun the sight of her, lest she strike you with longing. For she ensnares the eyes of men, overthrows their towns, and burns their houses, so potent are her witcheries! Well I know her; so do you and those her victims too. Helen


αἱρεῖ γὰρ ἀνδρῶν ὄμματ', ἐξαιρεῖ πόλειςI thank you, Menelaus, if you will slay that wife of yours. Yet shun the sight of her, lest she strike you with longing. For she ensnares the eyes of men, overthrows their towns, and burns their houses, so potent are her witcheries! Well I know her; so do you and those her victims too. Helen


πίμπρησιν οἴκους: ὧδ' ἔχει κηλήματα.I thank you, Menelaus, if you will slay that wife of yours. Yet shun the sight of her, lest she strike you with longing. For she ensnares the eyes of men, overthrows their towns, and burns their houses, so potent are her witcheries! Well I know her; so do you and those her victims too. Helen


ἐγώ νιν οἶδα, καὶ σύ, χοἱ πεπονθότες.I thank you, Menelaus, if you will slay that wife of yours. Yet shun the sight of her, lest she strike you with longing. For she ensnares the eyes of men, overthrows their towns, and burns their houses, so potent are her witcheries! Well I know her; so do you and those her victims too. Helen


Μενέλαε, φροίμιον μὲν ἄξιον φόβουMenelaus! this prelude well may fill me with alarm; for I am taken with violence by your servants’ hands and brought before these tents. Still, though I am sure you hate me, yet I want to inquire


τόδ' ἐστίν: ἐν γὰρ χερσὶ προσπόλων σέθενMenelaus! this prelude well may fill me with alarm; for I am taken with violence by your servants’ hands and brought before these tents. Still, though I am sure you hate me, yet I want to inquire


βίᾳ πρὸ τῶνδε δωμάτων ἐκπέμπομαι.Menelaus! this prelude well may fill me with alarm; for I am taken with violence by your servants’ hands and brought before these tents. Still, though I am sure you hate me, yet I want to inquire


ἀτὰρ σχεδὸν μὲν οἶδά σοι μισουμένηMenelaus! this prelude well may fill me with alarm; for I am taken with violence by your servants’ hands and brought before these tents. Still, though I am sure you hate me, yet I want to inquire


ὅμως δ' ἐρέσθαι βούλομαι: γνῶμαι τίνεςMenelaus! this prelude well may fill me with alarm; for I am taken with violence by your servants’ hands and brought before these tents. Still, though I am sure you hate me, yet I want to inquire


̔́Ελλησι καὶ σοὶ τῆς ἐμῆς ψυχῆς πέρι;what you and Hellas have decided about my life. Menelau


οὐκ εἰς ἀκριβὲς ἦλθες, ἀλλ' ἅπας στρατὸςTo judge your case required no great exactness; the army with one consent, that army whom you wronged, handed you over to me to die. Helen


κτανεῖν ἐμοί ς' ἔδωκεν, ὅνπερ ἠδίκεις.To judge your case required no great exactness; the army with one consent, that army whom you wronged, handed you over to me to die. Helen


ἔξεστιν οὖν πρὸς ταῦτ' ἀμείψασθαι λόγῳMay I answer this decision, proving that my death, if I am to die, will be unjust? Menelau


ὡς οὐ δικαίως, ἢν θάνω, θανούμεθα;May I answer this decision, proving that my death, if I am to die, will be unjust? Menelau


οὐκ ἐς λόγους ἐλήλυθ', ἀλλά σε κτενῶν.I came not to argue, but to slay you. Hecuba


ἄκουσον αὐτῆς, μὴ θάνῃ τοῦδ' ἐνδεήςHear her, Menelaus; let her not die for want of that, and let me answer her again, for you know nothing of her villainies in Troy ; and the whole case, if summed up


Μενέλαε, καὶ δὸς τοὺς ἐναντίους λόγουςHear her, Menelaus; let her not die for want of that, and let me answer her again, for you know nothing of her villainies in Troy ; and the whole case, if summed up


ἡμῖν κατ' αὐτῆς: τῶν γὰρ ἐν Τροίᾳ κακῶνHear her, Menelaus; let her not die for want of that, and let me answer her again, for you know nothing of her villainies in Troy ; and the whole case, if summed up


οὐδὲν κάτοισθα. συντεθεὶς δ' ὁ πᾶς λόγοςHear her, Menelaus; let her not die for want of that, and let me answer her again, for you know nothing of her villainies in Troy ; and the whole case, if summed up


κτενεῖ νιν οὕτως ὥστε μηδαμοῦ φυγεῖν.will insure her death against all chance of an escape. Menelau


σχολῆς τὸ δῶρον: εἰ δὲ βούλεται λέγεινThis gift needs leisure; still, if she wishes to speak, she may. Yet I will grant her this because of your words, that she may hear them, and not for her own sake. Helen


ἔξεστι. τῶν σῶν δ' οὕνεχ' — ὡς μάθῃ — λόγωνThis gift needs leisure; still, if she wishes to speak, she may. Yet I will grant her this because of your words, that she may hear them, and not for her own sake. Helen


δώσω τόδ' αὐτῇ: τῆσδε δ' οὐ δώσω χάριν.Perhaps you will not answer me, from counting me a foe


ἴσως με, κἂν εὖ κἂν κακῶς δόξω λέγεινPerhaps you will not answer me, from counting me a foe


οὐκ ἀνταμείψῃ πολεμίαν ἡγούμενος.whether my words seem good or ill. Yet I will put my charges and yours over against each other, and then reply to the accusations I suppose you will advance against me. First, then, that woman was the author of these trouble


ἐγὼ δ', ἅ ς' οἶμαι διὰ λόγων ἰόντ' ἐμοῦwhether my words seem good or ill. Yet I will put my charges and yours over against each other, and then reply to the accusations I suppose you will advance against me. First, then, that woman was the author of these trouble


κατηγορήσειν, ἀντιθεῖς' ἀμείψομαιwhether my words seem good or ill. Yet I will put my charges and yours over against each other, and then reply to the accusations I suppose you will advance against me. First, then, that woman was the author of these trouble


τοῖς σοῖσι τἀμὰ καὶ τὰ ς' αἰτιάματα.whether my words seem good or ill. Yet I will put my charges and yours over against each other, and then reply to the accusations I suppose you will advance against me. First, then, that woman was the author of these trouble


πρῶτον μὲν ἀρχὰς ἔτεκεν ἥδε τῶν κακῶνwhether my words seem good or ill. Yet I will put my charges and yours over against each other, and then reply to the accusations I suppose you will advance against me. First, then, that woman was the author of these trouble


Πάριν τεκοῦσα: δεύτερον δ' ἀπώλεσεby giving birth to Paris ; next, old Priam ruined Troy and me, because he did not slay his child Alexander, baleful semblance of a fire-brand, Hecuba had dreamed she would hear a son who would cause the ruin of Troy ; on the birth of Paris an oracle confirmed her fears. long ago. Hear what followed. This man was to judge the claims of three rival goddesses;


Τροίαν τε κἄμ' ὁ πρέσβυς οὐ κτανὼν βρέφοςby giving birth to Paris ; next, old Priam ruined Troy and me, because he did not slay his child Alexander, baleful semblance of a fire-brand, Hecuba had dreamed she would hear a son who would cause the ruin of Troy ; on the birth of Paris an oracle confirmed her fears. long ago. Hear what followed. This man was to judge the claims of three rival goddesses;


δαλοῦ πικρὸν μίμημ', ̓Αλέξανδρόν ποτε.by giving birth to Paris ; next, old Priam ruined Troy and me, because he did not slay his child Alexander, baleful semblance of a fire-brand, Hecuba had dreamed she would hear a son who would cause the ruin of Troy ; on the birth of Paris an oracle confirmed her fears. long ago. Hear what followed. This man was to judge the claims of three rival goddesses;


ἐνθένδε τἀπίλοιπ' ἄκουσον ὡς ἔχει.by giving birth to Paris ; next, old Priam ruined Troy and me, because he did not slay his child Alexander, baleful semblance of a fire-brand, Hecuba had dreamed she would hear a son who would cause the ruin of Troy ; on the birth of Paris an oracle confirmed her fears. long ago. Hear what followed. This man was to judge the claims of three rival goddesses;


ἔκρινε τρισσὸν ζεῦγος ὅδε τριῶν θεῶν:by giving birth to Paris ; next, old Priam ruined Troy and me, because he did not slay his child Alexander, baleful semblance of a fire-brand, Hecuba had dreamed she would hear a son who would cause the ruin of Troy ; on the birth of Paris an oracle confirmed her fears. long ago. Hear what followed. This man was to judge the claims of three rival goddesses;


καὶ Παλλάδος μὲν ἦν ̓Αλεξάνδρῳ δόσιςo Pallas offered him command of all the Phrygians, and the destruction of Hellas ; Hera promised he should spread his dominion over Asia , and the utmost bounds of Europe , if he would decide for her; but Cypris spoke in rapture of my loveliness


Φρυξὶ στρατηγοῦνθ' ̔Ελλάδ' ἐξανιστάναιo Pallas offered him command of all the Phrygians, and the destruction of Hellas ; Hera promised he should spread his dominion over Asia , and the utmost bounds of Europe , if he would decide for her; but Cypris spoke in rapture of my loveliness


̔́Ηρα δ' ὑπέσχετ' ̓Ασιάδ' Εὐρώπης θ' ὅρουςo Pallas offered him command of all the Phrygians, and the destruction of Hellas ; Hera promised he should spread his dominion over Asia , and the utmost bounds of Europe , if he would decide for her; but Cypris spoke in rapture of my loveliness


τυραννίδ' ἕξειν, εἴ σφε κρίνειεν Πάρις:o Pallas offered him command of all the Phrygians, and the destruction of Hellas ; Hera promised he should spread his dominion over Asia , and the utmost bounds of Europe , if he would decide for her; but Cypris spoke in rapture of my loveliness


Κύπρις δὲ τοὐμὸν εἶδος ἐκπαγλουμένηo Pallas offered him command of all the Phrygians, and the destruction of Hellas ; Hera promised he should spread his dominion over Asia , and the utmost bounds of Europe , if he would decide for her; but Cypris spoke in rapture of my loveliness


δώσειν ὑπέσχετ', εἰ θεὰς ὑπερδράμοιand promised him this gift, if she should have the preference over those two for beauty. Now mark the inference I deduce from this; Cypris won the day over the goddesses, and thus far has my marriage proved of benefit to Hellas , that you are not subject to barbarian rule, neither vanquished in the strife, nor yet by tyrants crushed.


κάλλει. τὸν ἔνθεν δ' ὡς ἔχει σκέψαι λόγον:and promised him this gift, if she should have the preference over those two for beauty. Now mark the inference I deduce from this; Cypris won the day over the goddesses, and thus far has my marriage proved of benefit to Hellas , that you are not subject to barbarian rule, neither vanquished in the strife, nor yet by tyrants crushed.


νικᾷ Κύπρις θεάς, καὶ τοσόνδ' οὑμοὶ γάμοιand promised him this gift, if she should have the preference over those two for beauty. Now mark the inference I deduce from this; Cypris won the day over the goddesses, and thus far has my marriage proved of benefit to Hellas , that you are not subject to barbarian rule, neither vanquished in the strife, nor yet by tyrants crushed.


ὤνησαν ̔Ελλάδ': οὐ κρατεῖσθ' ἐκ βαρβάρωνand promised him this gift, if she should have the preference over those two for beauty. Now mark the inference I deduce from this; Cypris won the day over the goddesses, and thus far has my marriage proved of benefit to Hellas , that you are not subject to barbarian rule, neither vanquished in the strife, nor yet by tyrants crushed.


οὔτ' ἐς δόρυ σταθέντες, οὐ τυραννίδι.and promised him this gift, if she should have the preference over those two for beauty. Now mark the inference I deduce from this; Cypris won the day over the goddesses, and thus far has my marriage proved of benefit to Hellas , that you are not subject to barbarian rule, neither vanquished in the strife, nor yet by tyrants crushed.


ἃ δ' εὐτύχησεν ̔Ελλάς, ὠλόμην ἐγὼWhat Hellas gained, was ruin to me, sold for my beauty, and now I am reproached for that which should have set a crown upon my head. But you will say I am silent on the real matter at hand, how it was I started forth and left your house by stealth.


εὐμορφίᾳ πραθεῖσα, κὠνειδίζομαιWhat Hellas gained, was ruin to me, sold for my beauty, and now I am reproached for that which should have set a crown upon my head. But you will say I am silent on the real matter at hand, how it was I started forth and left your house by stealth.


ἐξ ὧν ἐχρῆν με στέφανον ἐπὶ κάρᾳ λαβεῖν.What Hellas gained, was ruin to me, sold for my beauty, and now I am reproached for that which should have set a crown upon my head. But you will say I am silent on the real matter at hand, how it was I started forth and left your house by stealth.


οὔπω με φήσεις αὐτὰ τἀν ποσὶν λέγεινWhat Hellas gained, was ruin to me, sold for my beauty, and now I am reproached for that which should have set a crown upon my head. But you will say I am silent on the real matter at hand, how it was I started forth and left your house by stealth.


ὅπως ἀφώρμης' ἐκ δόμων τῶν σῶν λάθρα.What Hellas gained, was ruin to me, sold for my beauty, and now I am reproached for that which should have set a crown upon my head. But you will say I am silent on the real matter at hand, how it was I started forth and left your house by stealth.


ἦλθ' οὐχὶ μικρὰν θεὸν ἔχων αὑτοῦ μέταWith no small goddess at his side he came, my evil genius, call him Alexander or Paris , as you will; and you, villain, left him behind in your house, and sailed away from Sparta to the land of Crete .


ὁ τῆσδ' ἀλάστωρ, εἴτ' ̓Αλέξανδρον θέλειςWith no small goddess at his side he came, my evil genius, call him Alexander or Paris , as you will; and you, villain, left him behind in your house, and sailed away from Sparta to the land of Crete .


ὀνόματι προσφωνεῖν νιν εἴτε καὶ Πάριν:With no small goddess at his side he came, my evil genius, call him Alexander or Paris , as you will; and you, villain, left him behind in your house, and sailed away from Sparta to the land of Crete .


ὅν, ὦ κάκιστε, σοῖσιν ἐν δόμοις λιπὼνWith no small goddess at his side he came, my evil genius, call him Alexander or Paris , as you will; and you, villain, left him behind in your house, and sailed away from Sparta to the land of Crete .


Σπάρτης ἀπῆρας νηὶ Κρησίαν χθόνα.With no small goddess at his side he came, my evil genius, call him Alexander or Paris , as you will; and you, villain, left him behind in your house, and sailed away from Sparta to the land of Crete .


εἶἑν.Enough of this! For all that followed I must question myself, not you; what thought led me to follow the stranger from your house, traitress to my country and my home? Punish the goddess, show yourself more mighty even than Zeus, who, though he lords it over the other gods


οὐ σέ, ἀλλ' ἐμαυτὴν τοὐπὶ τῷδ' ἐρήσομαι:Enough of this! For all that followed I must question myself, not you; what thought led me to follow the stranger from your house, traitress to my country and my home? Punish the goddess, show yourself more mighty even than Zeus, who, though he lords it over the other gods


τί δὴ φρονοῦσά γ' ἐκ δόμων ἅμ' ἑσπόμηνEnough of this! For all that followed I must question myself, not you; what thought led me to follow the stranger from your house, traitress to my country and my home? Punish the goddess, show yourself more mighty even than Zeus, who, though he lords it over the other gods


ξένῳ, προδοῦσα πατρίδα καὶ δόμους ἐμούς;Enough of this! For all that followed I must question myself, not you; what thought led me to follow the stranger from your house, traitress to my country and my home? Punish the goddess, show yourself more mighty even than Zeus, who, though he lords it over the other gods


τὴν θεὸν κόλαζε καὶ Διὸς κρείσσων γενοῦEnough of this! For all that followed I must question myself, not you; what thought led me to follow the stranger from your house, traitress to my country and my home? Punish the goddess, show yourself more mighty even than Zeus, who, though he lords it over the other gods


ὃς τῶν μὲν ἄλλων δαιμόνων ἔχει κράτοςis her slave; therefore I may well be pardoned. Still, from this you might draw a specious argument against me; when Paris died, and earth concealed his corpse, I should have left his house and sought the Argive fleet, since my marriage was no longer in the hands of gods.


κείνης δὲ δοῦλός ἐστι: συγγνώμη δ' ἐμοί.is her slave; therefore I may well be pardoned. Still, from this you might draw a specious argument against me; when Paris died, and earth concealed his corpse, I should have left his house and sought the Argive fleet, since my marriage was no longer in the hands of gods.


ἔνθεν δ' ἔχοις ἂν εἰς ἔμ' εὐπρεπῆ λόγον:is her slave; therefore I may well be pardoned. Still, from this you might draw a specious argument against me; when Paris died, and earth concealed his corpse, I should have left his house and sought the Argive fleet, since my marriage was no longer in the hands of gods.


ἐπεὶ θανὼν γῆς ἦλθ' ̓Αλέξανδρος μυχούςis her slave; therefore I may well be pardoned. Still, from this you might draw a specious argument against me; when Paris died, and earth concealed his corpse, I should have left his house and sought the Argive fleet, since my marriage was no longer in the hands of gods.


χρῆν μ', ἡνίκ' οὐκ ἦν θεοπόνητά μου λέχηis her slave; therefore I may well be pardoned. Still, from this you might draw a specious argument against me; when Paris died, and earth concealed his corpse, I should have left his house and sought the Argive fleet, since my marriage was no longer in the hands of gods.


λιποῦσαν οἴκους ναῦς ἐπ' ̓Αργείων μολεῖν.is her slave; therefore I may well be pardoned. Still, from this you might draw a specious argument against me; when Paris died, and earth concealed his corpse, I should have left his house and sought the Argive fleet, since my marriage was no longer in the hands of gods.


ἔσπευδον αὐτὸ τοῦτο: μάρτυρες δέ μοιThat was what I was eager to do; and the warders on the towers and watchmen on the walls can bear me witness, for often they found me seeking to let myself down stealthily by cords from the battlements but there was that new husband, Deiphobus, that carried me off


πύργων πυλωροὶ κἀπὸ τειχέων σκοποίThat was what I was eager to do; and the warders on the towers and watchmen on the walls can bear me witness, for often they found me seeking to let myself down stealthily by cords from the battlements but there was that new husband, Deiphobus, that carried me off


οἳ πολλάκις μ' ἐφηῦρον ἐξ ἐπάλξεωνThat was what I was eager to do; and the warders on the towers and watchmen on the walls can bear me witness, for often they found me seeking to let myself down stealthily by cords from the battlements but there was that new husband, Deiphobus, that carried me off


πλεκταῖσιν ἐς γῆν σῶμα κλέπτουσαν τόδε.That was what I was eager to do; and the warders on the towers and watchmen on the walls can bear me witness, for often they found me seeking to let myself down stealthily by cords from the battlements but there was that new husband, Deiphobus, that carried me off


βίᾳ δ' ὁ καινός μ' οὗτος ἁρπάσας πόσιςThat was what I was eager to do; and the warders on the towers and watchmen on the walls can bear me witness, for often they found me seeking to let myself down stealthily by cords from the battlements but there was that new husband, Deiphobus, that carried me off


Δηίφοβος ἄλοχον εἶχεν ἀκόντων Φρυγῶν.by force to be his wife against the will of Troy . How then, my lord, could I be justly put to death . . . by you, with any show of right, seeing that he wedded me against my will, and those my other natural gifts have served a bitter slavery, instead of leading on to triumph? If it is your will indeed


πῶς οὖν ἔτ' ἂν θνῄσκοιμ' ἂν ἐνδίκως, πόσιby force to be his wife against the will of Troy . How then, my lord, could I be justly put to death . . . by you, with any show of right, seeing that he wedded me against my will, and those my other natural gifts have served a bitter slavery, instead of leading on to triumph? If it is your will indeed


nanby force to be his wife against the will of Troy . How then, my lord, could I be justly put to death . . . by you, with any show of right, seeing that he wedded me against my will, and those my other natural gifts have served a bitter slavery, instead of leading on to triumph? If it is your will indeed


πρὸς σοῦ δικαίως, ἣν ὁ μὲν βίᾳ γαμεῖby force to be his wife against the will of Troy . How then, my lord, could I be justly put to death . . . by you, with any show of right, seeing that he wedded me against my will, and those my other natural gifts have served a bitter slavery, instead of leading on to triumph? If it is your will indeed


τὰ δ' οἴκοθεν κεῖν' ἀντὶ νικητηρίωνby force to be his wife against the will of Troy . How then, my lord, could I be justly put to death . . . by you, with any show of right, seeing that he wedded me against my will, and those my other natural gifts have served a bitter slavery, instead of leading on to triumph? If it is your will indeed


πικρῶς ἐδούλευς'; εἰ δὲ τῶν θεῶν κρατεῖνto master gods, that very wish displays your folly. Chorus Leader


βούλῃ, τὸ χρῄζειν ἀμαθές ἐστί σου τόδε.to master gods, that very wish displays your folly. Chorus Leader


βασίλει', ἄμυνον σοῖς τέκνοισι καὶ πάτρᾳO my royal mistress, defend your children’s and your country’s cause, bringing to nothing her persuasive arguments, for she pleads well in spite of all her villainy; this is monstrous! Hecuba


πειθὼ διαφθείρουσα τῆσδ', ἐπεὶ λέγειO my royal mistress, defend your children’s and your country’s cause, bringing to nothing her persuasive arguments, for she pleads well in spite of all her villainy; this is monstrous! Hecuba


καλῶς κακοῦργος οὖσα: δεινὸν οὖν τόδε.O my royal mistress, defend your children’s and your country’s cause, bringing to nothing her persuasive arguments, for she pleads well in spite of all her villainy; this is monstrous! Hecuba


ταῖς θεαῖσι πρῶτα σύμμαχος γενήσομαιFirst I will take up the cause of those goddesses


καὶ τήνδε δείξω μὴ λέγουσαν ἔνδικα.and prove how she perverts the truth. For I can never believe that Hera or the maiden Pallas would have been guilty of such folly, the one to sell her Argos to barbarians, or that Pallas ever would make her Athens subject to the Phrygians


ἐγὼ γὰρ ̔́Ηραν παρθένον τε Παλλάδαand prove how she perverts the truth. For I can never believe that Hera or the maiden Pallas would have been guilty of such folly, the one to sell her Argos to barbarians, or that Pallas ever would make her Athens subject to the Phrygians


οὐκ ἐς τοσοῦτον ἀμαθίας ἐλθεῖν δοκῶand prove how she perverts the truth. For I can never believe that Hera or the maiden Pallas would have been guilty of such folly, the one to sell her Argos to barbarians, or that Pallas ever would make her Athens subject to the Phrygians


ὥσθ' ἣ μὲν ̓́Αργος βαρβάροις ἀπημπόλαand prove how she perverts the truth. For I can never believe that Hera or the maiden Pallas would have been guilty of such folly, the one to sell her Argos to barbarians, or that Pallas ever would make her Athens subject to the Phrygians


Παλλὰς δ' ̓Αθήνας Φρυξὶ δουλεύειν ποτέand prove how she perverts the truth. For I can never believe that Hera or the maiden Pallas would have been guilty of such folly, the one to sell her Argos to barbarians, or that Pallas ever would make her Athens subject to the Phrygians


εἰ παιδιαῖσι καὶ χλιδῇ μορφῆς πέριcoming as they did in mere wanton sport to Ida to contest the palm of beauty. For why should goddess Hera set her heart so much on such a prize? Was it to win a nobler lord than Zeus? or was Athena hunting down among the gods a husband


ἦλθον πρὸς ̓́Ιδην. τοῦ γὰρ οὕνεκ' ἂν θεὰcoming as they did in mere wanton sport to Ida to contest the palm of beauty. For why should goddess Hera set her heart so much on such a prize? Was it to win a nobler lord than Zeus? or was Athena hunting down among the gods a husband


̔́Ηρα τοσοῦτον ἔσχ' ἔρωτα καλλονῆς;coming as they did in mere wanton sport to Ida to contest the palm of beauty. For why should goddess Hera set her heart so much on such a prize? Was it to win a nobler lord than Zeus? or was Athena hunting down among the gods a husband


πότερον ἀμείνον' ὡς λάβῃ Διὸς πόσιν;coming as they did in mere wanton sport to Ida to contest the palm of beauty. For why should goddess Hera set her heart so much on such a prize? Was it to win a nobler lord than Zeus? or was Athena hunting down among the gods a husband


ἢ γάμον ̓Αθηνᾶ θεῶν τίνος θηρωμένη —coming as they did in mere wanton sport to Ida to contest the palm of beauty. For why should goddess Hera set her heart so much on such a prize? Was it to win a nobler lord than Zeus? or was Athena hunting down among the gods a husband


ἣ παρθενείαν πατρὸς ἐξῃτήσατοhe who in her dislike of marriage won from her father the gift of remaining unwed? Do not seek to impute folly to the goddesses, in the attempt to adorn your own sin; never will you persuade the wise. Next you have said—what well may make men jeer—that Cypris came with my son to the house of Menelaus.


φεύγουσα λέκτρα; μὴ ἀμαθεῖς ποίει θεὰςhe who in her dislike of marriage won from her father the gift of remaining unwed? Do not seek to impute folly to the goddesses, in the attempt to adorn your own sin; never will you persuade the wise. Next you have said—what well may make men jeer—that Cypris came with my son to the house of Menelaus.


τὸ σὸν κακὸν κοσμοῦσα, μὴ οὐ πείσῃς σοφούς.he who in her dislike of marriage won from her father the gift of remaining unwed? Do not seek to impute folly to the goddesses, in the attempt to adorn your own sin; never will you persuade the wise. Next you have said—what well may make men jeer—that Cypris came with my son to the house of Menelaus.


Κύπριν δ' ἔλεξας — ταῦτα γὰρ γέλως πολύς —he who in her dislike of marriage won from her father the gift of remaining unwed? Do not seek to impute folly to the goddesses, in the attempt to adorn your own sin; never will you persuade the wise. Next you have said—what well may make men jeer—that Cypris came with my son to the house of Menelaus.


ἐλθεῖν ἐμῷ ξὺν παιδὶ Μενέλεω δόμους.he who in her dislike of marriage won from her father the gift of remaining unwed? Do not seek to impute folly to the goddesses, in the attempt to adorn your own sin; never will you persuade the wise. Next you have said—what well may make men jeer—that Cypris came with my son to the house of Menelaus.


οὐκ ἂν μένους' ἂν ἥσυχός ς' ἐν οὐρανῷCould she not have stayed quietly in heaven and brought you and Amyclae as well to Ilium ?


αὐταῖς ̓Αμύκλαις ἤγαγεν πρὸς ̓́Ιλιον;Could she not have stayed quietly in heaven and brought you and Amyclae as well to Ilium ?


ἦν οὑμὸς υἱὸς κάλλος ἐκπρεπέστατοςNo! my son was exceedingly handsome, and when you saw him your mind straight became your Aphrodite; for every folly that men commit, they lay upon this goddess


ὁ σὸς δ' ἰδών νιν νοῦς ἐποιήθη Κύπρις:No! my son was exceedingly handsome, and when you saw him your mind straight became your Aphrodite; for every folly that men commit, they lay upon this goddess


τὰ μῶρα γὰρ πάντ' ἐστὶν ̓Αφροδίτη βροτοῖςNo! my son was exceedingly handsome, and when you saw him your mind straight became your Aphrodite; for every folly that men commit, they lay upon this goddess


καὶ τοὔνομ' ὀρθῶς ἀφροσύνης ἄρχει θεᾶς.and rightly does her name It is almost impossible to reproduce the play on words in Ἀφροδίτη and ἀφροσύνη ; perhaps the nearest approach would be sensuality and senseless. begin the word for senselessness ; so when you caught sight of him in gorgeous foreign clothes, ablaze with gold, your senses utterly forsook you. Yes, for in Argos you had moved in simple state, but, once free of Sparta


ὃν εἰσιδοῦσα βαρβάροις ἐσθήμασιand rightly does her name It is almost impossible to reproduce the play on words in Ἀφροδίτη and ἀφροσύνη ; perhaps the nearest approach would be sensuality and senseless. begin the word for senselessness ; so when you caught sight of him in gorgeous foreign clothes, ablaze with gold, your senses utterly forsook you. Yes, for in Argos you had moved in simple state, but, once free of Sparta


χρυσῷ τε λαμπρὸν ἐξεμαργώθης φρένας.and rightly does her name It is almost impossible to reproduce the play on words in Ἀφροδίτη and ἀφροσύνη ; perhaps the nearest approach would be sensuality and senseless. begin the word for senselessness ; so when you caught sight of him in gorgeous foreign clothes, ablaze with gold, your senses utterly forsook you. Yes, for in Argos you had moved in simple state, but, once free of Sparta


ἐν μὲν γὰρ ̓́Αργει μίκρ' ἔχους' ἀνεστρέφουand rightly does her name It is almost impossible to reproduce the play on words in Ἀφροδίτη and ἀφροσύνη ; perhaps the nearest approach would be sensuality and senseless. begin the word for senselessness ; so when you caught sight of him in gorgeous foreign clothes, ablaze with gold, your senses utterly forsook you. Yes, for in Argos you had moved in simple state, but, once free of Sparta


Σπάρτης δ' ἀπαλλαχθεῖσα τὴν Φρυγῶν πόλινand rightly does her name It is almost impossible to reproduce the play on words in Ἀφροδίτη and ἀφροσύνη ; perhaps the nearest approach would be sensuality and senseless. begin the word for senselessness ; so when you caught sight of him in gorgeous foreign clothes, ablaze with gold, your senses utterly forsook you. Yes, for in Argos you had moved in simple state, but, once free of Sparta


χρυσῷ ῥέουσαν ἤλπισας κατακλύσεινit was your hope to deluge by your lavish outlay Phrygia ’s town, that flowed with gold; nor was the palace of Menelaus rich enough for your luxury to riot in.


δαπάναισιν: οὐδ' ἦν ἱκανά σοι τὰ Μενέλεωit was your hope to deluge by your lavish outlay Phrygia ’s town, that flowed with gold; nor was the palace of Menelaus rich enough for your luxury to riot in.


μέλαθρα ταῖς σαῖς ἐγκαθυβρίζειν τρυφαῖς.it was your hope to deluge by your lavish outlay Phrygia ’s town, that flowed with gold; nor was the palace of Menelaus rich enough for your luxury to riot in.


εἶἑν: βίᾳ γὰρ παῖδα φῄς ς' ἄγειν ἐμόν:Enough of this! My son carried you off by force, so you say; what Spartan saw this? what cry for help


τίς Σπαρτιατῶν ᾔσθετ'; ἢ ποίαν βοὴνEnough of this! My son carried you off by force, so you say; what Spartan saw this? what cry for help


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.169 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.169. /who roused against me the tearful war of the Achaeans —and that thou mayest tell me who is this huge warrior, this man of Achaea so valiant and so tall. Verily there be others that are even taller by a head, but so comely a man have mine eyes never yet beheld
2. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1206, 1181 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1181. πνέων ἐσᾴξειν, ὥστε κύματος δίκην 1181. Breathing, to penetrate thee: so as, wave-like
3. Euripides, Electra, 1001-1010, 1024-1029, 1032, 1035, 1055-1059, 1064, 107, 1071-1073, 108, 1097, 1107, 1118-1119, 1124-1131, 175-180, 184-185, 239, 241, 302-311, 998-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Hecuba, 252-295, 923-925, 251 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Hippolytus, 972, 971 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Medea, 1137-1230, 324, 346-347, 475, 515, 522, 546, 1136 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Orestes, 1112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1112. They are only fit to look after mirrors and perfumes! Pylade
8. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 469-472, 481-495, 499-503, 524-525, 468 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 164, 176-179, 188-189, 163 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1002-1059, 1070, 1096, 1277-1278, 130-137, 675, 766-773, 860-999, 1001 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Herodotus, Histories, 1.4.2, 1.5.2, 2.113-2.115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.4.2. “We think,” they say, “that it is unjust to carry women off. But to be anxious to avenge rape is foolish: wise men take no notice of such things. For plainly the women would never have been carried away, had they not wanted it themselves. 1.5.2. But the Phoenicians do not tell the same story about Io as the Persians. They say that they did not carry her off to Egypt by force. She had intercourse in Argos with the captain of the ship. Then, finding herself pregt, she was ashamed to have her parents know it, and so, lest they discover her condition, she sailed away with the Phoenicians of her own accord. 2.113. When I inquired of the priests, they told me that this was the story of Helen. After carrying off Helen from Sparta, Alexandrus sailed away for his own country; violent winds caught him in the Aegean and drove him into the Egyptian sea; and from there (as the wind did not let up) he came to Egypt, to the mouth of the Nile called the Canopic mouth, and to the Salters'. ,Now there was (and still is) on the coast a temple of Heracles; if a servant of any man takes refuge there and is branded with certain sacred marks, delivering himself to the god, he may not be touched. This law continues today the same as it has always been from the first. ,Hearing of the temple law, some of Alexandrus' servants ran away from him, threw themselves on the mercy of the god, and brought an accusation against Alexandrus meaning to injure him, telling the whole story of Helen and the wrong done Menelaus. They laid this accusation before the priests and the warden of the Nile mouth, whose name was Thonis. 2.114. When Thonis heard it, he sent this message the quickest way to Proteus at Memphis : ,“A stranger has come, a Trojan, who has committed an impiety in Hellas . After defrauding his guest-friend, he has come bringing the man's wife and a very great deal of wealth, driven to your country by the wind. Are we to let him sail away untouched, or are we to take away what he has come with?” ,Proteus sent back this message: “Whoever this is who has acted impiously against his guest-friend, seize him and bring him to me, that I may know what he will say.” 2.115. Hearing this, Thonis seized Alexandrus and detained his ships there, and then brought him with Helen and all the wealth, and the suppliants too, to Memphis . ,When all had arrived, Proteus asked Alexandrus who he was and whence he sailed; Alexandrus told him his lineage and the name of his country, and about his voyage, whence he sailed. ,Then Proteus asked him where he had got Helen; when Alexandrus was evasive in his story and did not tell the truth, the men who had taken refuge with the temple confuted him, and related the whole story of the wrong. ,Finally, Proteus declared the following judgment to them, saying, “If I did not make it a point never to kill a stranger who has been caught by the wind and driven to my coasts, I would have punished you on behalf of the Greek, you most vile man. You committed the gravest impiety after you had had your guest-friend's hospitality: you had your guest-friend's wife. ,And as if this were not enough, you got her to fly with you and went off with her. And not just with her, either, but you plundered your guest-friend's wealth and brought it, too. ,Now, then, since I make it a point not to kill strangers, I shall not let you take away this woman and the wealth, but I shall watch them for the Greek stranger, until he come and take them away; but as for you and your sailors, I warn you to leave my country for another within three days, and if you do not, I will declare war on you.”
12. Sophocles, Ajax, 501-505, 510-513, 500 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.34-3.50 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.6.27, 1.7, 2.3.24-2.3.29 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.3.24. Then when Theramenes arrived, Critias arose and spoke as follows: Gentlemen of the Senate, if anyone among you thinks that more people than is fitting are being put to death, let him reflect that where governments are changed these things always take place; and it is inevitable that those who are changing the government here to an oligarchy should have most numerous enemies, both because the state is the most populous of the Greek states and because the commons have been bred up in a condition of freedom for the longest time. 2.3.25. Now we, believing that for men like ourselves and you democracy is a grievous form of government, and convinced that the commons would never become friendly to the Lacedaemonians, our preservers, while the aristocrats would continue ever faithful to them, for these reasons are establishing, with the approval of the Lacedaemonians, the present form of government. 2.3.26. And if we find anyone opposed to the oligarchy, so far as we have the power we put him out of the way; but in particular we consider it to be right that, if any one of our own number is harming this order of things, he should be punished. 2.3.27. Now in fact we find this man Theramenes trying, by what means he can, to destroy both ourselves and you. As proof that this is true you will discover, if you consider the matter, that no one finds more 404 B.C. fault with the present proceedings than Theramenes here, or offers more opposition when we wish to put some demagogue out of the way. Now if he had held these views from the beginning, he was, to be sure, an enemy, but nevertheless he would not justly be deemed a scoundrel. 2.3.28. In fact, however, he was the very man who took the initiative in the policy of establishing a cordial understanding with the Lacedaemonians; he was the very man who began the overthrow of the democracy, and who urged you most to inflict punishment upon those who were first brought before you for trial; but now, when you and we have manifestly become hateful to the democrats, he no longer approves of what is going on,—just so that he may get on the safe side again, and that we may be punished for what has been done. 2.3.29. Therefore he ought to be punished, not merely as an enemy, but also as a traitor both to you and to ourselves. And treason is a far more dreadful thing than war, inasmuch as it is harder to take precaution against the hidden than against the open danger, and a far more hateful thing, inasmuch as men make peace with enemies and become their trustful friends again, but if they catch a man playing the traitor, they never in any case make peace with that man or trust him thereafter.
15. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 2.502, 4.1024-4.1025 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2.502. παρθενίη καὶ λέκτρον ἀκήρατον. αὐτὰρ Ἀπόλλων 4.1024. μῆτις ἔην. ἔτι μοι μίτρη μένει, ὡς ἐνὶ πατρὸς 4.1025. δώμασιν, ἄχραντος καὶ ἀκήρατος. ἀλλʼ ἐλέαιρε
16. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, 14.41-14.42, 14.47-14.62



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170
agamemnon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
agon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
aidos Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170
ajax, greater de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
alexandros Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
amazons, attic amazonomachy Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 177
and ares, in \u00100000lagrante Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170
andromache Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170
antiope, abducted by theseus Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 149
antiope, elopement with theseus Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 149, 177
apollonius rhodius Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170
arete Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170
arginusae de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
aristotle, poetics Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
athens de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
barbarians, trojans as Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 105
beauty Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 51
beauty contests Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 51
body, human, in antiquity, and desire Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 51
body, human, in antiquity, and feminism Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47
body, human, in antiquity, female Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47, 48, 51
body, human, in antiquity, ideals of Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 51
body, human, in antiquity, in athens Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47, 48, 51
body, human, in antiquity, in greek tragedy Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47, 48, 51
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
chorus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
collard, c. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
commodification Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 48
community Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
deiphobos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
desire Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 51
dubischar, m. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578; Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 48
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
emotions, anger management de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
euripides Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170; Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47, 48, 51
female body Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47, 48, 51
forensic oratory Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
gorgias Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 120
hair Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47, 48
hecuba Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85; Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170; Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 105; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
helen Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85; Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170; Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 105
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
homer Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 51
hybris, and religion Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 149
literary sources for the humanbody in antiquity, greek Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47, 48, 51
lloyd, m. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
male body Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 51
mastronarde, d. j. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
medea Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170; Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47, 48
menelaus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85; Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170
mytilene de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
narcissism Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47
oral poetry Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170
oratory Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
pain/suffering de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
palamedes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
priam Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
prostitutes Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 51
rape, in athenian law Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 177
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
rhêsis/eis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
scodel, ruth Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 105
seduction, in athenian law Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 177
seduction Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 149, 177
simile Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 170
sophocles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
sparta de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
speaker Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
spectacle, body as Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 51
speech, and narrative de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
syracuse de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
thucydides de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218
tragedy, greek Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 47, 48, 51
trial–debate Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 85
trojan women (euripides), and trojan futures Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 105
trojan women (euripides) Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 105
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
troy, greek perceptions of Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 105
winds' Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 105
xenophon de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 218