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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5642
Euripides, Trojan Women, 721-725


νικᾷ δ' ̓Οδυσσεὺς ἐν Πανέλλησιν λέγωνSo spoke Odysseus to the assembled Hellenes, and his word prevails. Andromache


αἰαῖ μάλ': οὐ γὰρ μέτρια πάσχομεν κακά.Oh, once again alas! there is no measure in the woes I bear. Talthybiu


λέξας ἀρίστου παῖδα μὴ τρέφειν πατρὸςHe said they should not rear so brave a father’s son. Andromache


τοιαῦτα νικήσειε τῶν αὑτοῦ πέρι.May such counsels prevail about children of his! Talthybiu


ῥῖψαι δὲ πύργων δεῖν σφε Τρωικῶν ἄπο.He must be thrown from Troy ’s battlements. Let it be so, and you will show more wisdom; do not cling to him, but bear your sorrows with heroic heart, nor in your weakness think that you are strong. For nowhere do you have any help; consider this you must;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 24.734-24.739 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

24.734. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.735. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.736. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.737. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.738. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.739. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war.
2. Euripides, Andromache, 223-227, 32, 222 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

222. ὦ φίλταθ' ̔́Εκτορ, ἀλλ' ἐγὼ τὴν σὴν χάριν
3. Euripides, Hecuba, 219-331, 345, 349-366, 369-372, 387-388, 218 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1128-1135, 577-597, 603, 613-615, 628-633, 660-661, 665-670, 673-676, 678, 680-683, 697-707, 709-720, 722-725, 764-766, 860, 880-882, 884-888, 896-897, 903-904, 906-910, 1127 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Lycophron, Alexandra, 1268 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

6. Apollodorus, Epitome, 3.32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.32. ἀνέλκουσι δὲ τὰς ναῦς. μὴ θαρρούντων δὲ τῶν βαρβάρων, Ἀχιλλεὺς ἐνεδρεύσας Τρωίλον ἐν τῷ τοῦ Θυμβραίου Ἀπόλλωνος ἱερῷ φονεύει, καὶ νυκτὸς ἐλθὼν ἐπὶ τὴν πόλιν Λυκάονα λαμβάνει. παραλαβὼν δὲ Ἀχιλλεύς τινας τῶν ἀριστέων τὴν χώραν ἐπόρθει, καὶ παραγίνεται εἰς Ἴδην ἐπὶ τὰς Αἰνείου τοῦ Πριάμου 1 -- βόας. φυγόντος δὲ αὐτοῦ, τοὺς βουκόλους κτείνας καὶ Μήστορα 2 -- τὸν Πριάμου τὰς βόας ἐλαύνει. 3.32. The barbarians showing no courage, Achilles waylaid Troilus and slaughtered him in the sanctuary of Thymbraean Apollo, Compare Proclus in Epicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. G. Kinkel, p. 20 ; Scholiast on Hom. Il. xxiv.257 (where for ὀχευθῆναι it has been proposed to read λοχηθῆναι or λογχευθῆναἰ; Eustathius on Hom. Il. xxiv.251,p. 1348 ; Dio Chrysostom xi. vol. i. p. 189, ed. L. Dindorf ; Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 307-313 ; Verg. A. 1.474ff. ; Serv. Verg. A. 1.474 ; Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini, ed. Bode, i. p. 66 (First Vatican Mythographer 210) . Troilus is represented as a youth, but the stories concerning his death are various. According to Eustathius, the lad was exercising his horses in the Thymbraeum or sanctuary of the Thymbraean Apollo, when Achilles killed him with his spear. Tzetzes says that he was a son of Hecuba by Apollo, though nominally by Priam, that he fled from his assailant to the temple of Apollo, and was cut down by Achilles at the altar. There was a prophecy that Troy could not be taken if Troilus should live to the age of twenty (so the First Vatican Mythographer). This may have been the motive of Achilles for slaying the lad. According to Dictys Cretensis iv.9, Troilus was taken prisoner and publicly slaughtered in cold blood by order of Achilles. The indefatigable Sophocles, as usual, wrote a tragedy on the subject. See The Fragments of Sophocles, ed. A. C. Pearson, vol. ii. pp. 253ff. and coming by night to the city he captured Lycaon. Compare Hom. Il. 11.34ff. ; Hom. Il. 13.746ff. Lycaon was captured by Achilles when he was cutting sticks in the orchard of his father Priam. After being sold by his captor into slavery in Lemnos he was ransomed and returned to Troy, but meeting Achilles in battle a few days later, he was ruthlessly slain by him. The story seems to have been told also in the epic Cypria . See Proclus in Epicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. G. Kinkel, p. 20 . Moreover, taking some of the chiefs with him, Achilles laid waste the country, and made his way to Ida to lift the kine of Aeneas. But Aeneas fled, and Achilles killed the neatherds and Nestor, son of Priam, and drove away the kine. Compare Hom. Il. 20.90ff. ; Hom. Il. 20.188ff. ; Proclus in Epicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. G. Kinkel, p. 20 .


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
aeneas de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
agôn/-es' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 266
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 142; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
apollo Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 142; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
astyanax de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 142
hector de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 266
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 142
iliupersis de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
lloyd, m. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 266
narratee, viewing narratee de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
odysseus de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
pictorial language de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
pindar Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 142
poe, j.p. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 266
priam de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
scharffenberger, e.w. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 142
sophocles, hermione Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 142
troilus de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 142, 266
troy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
vase-painting, typical compositions de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
vase-painting, typical elements de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
vase-painting de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233
zeus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 266; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 233