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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5642
Euripides, Trojan Women, 1156-1206


θέσθ' ἀμφίτορνον ἀσπίδ' ̔́Εκτορος πέδῳPlace the shield upon the ground, Hector’s shield so deftly rounded, a piteous sight, a bitter grief for me to see. O you Achaeans, more reason have you to boast of your prowess than your wisdom. Why have you in terror of this child


λυπρὸν θέαμα κοὐ φίλον λεύσσειν ἐμοί.Place the shield upon the ground, Hector’s shield so deftly rounded, a piteous sight, a bitter grief for me to see. O you Achaeans, more reason have you to boast of your prowess than your wisdom. Why have you in terror of this child


ὦ μείζον' ὄγκον δορὸς ἔχοντες ἢ φρενῶνPlace the shield upon the ground, Hector’s shield so deftly rounded, a piteous sight, a bitter grief for me to see. O you Achaeans, more reason have you to boast of your prowess than your wisdom. Why have you in terror of this child


τί τόνδ', ̓Αχαιοί, παῖδα δείσαντες φόνονPlace the shield upon the ground, Hector’s shield so deftly rounded, a piteous sight, a bitter grief for me to see. O you Achaeans, more reason have you to boast of your prowess than your wisdom. Why have you in terror of this child


καινὸν διειργάσασθε; μὴ Τροίαν ποτὲbeen guilty of a murder never matched before? Did you fear that some day he would rear again the fallen walls of Troy ? It seems then you were nothing after all, when, though Hector’s fortunes in the war were prosperous and he had ten thousand other arms to back him, we still were daily overmatched; and yet, now that our city is taken and every Phrygian slain


πεσοῦσαν ὀρθώσειεν; οὐδὲν ἦτ' ἄραbeen guilty of a murder never matched before? Did you fear that some day he would rear again the fallen walls of Troy ? It seems then you were nothing after all, when, though Hector’s fortunes in the war were prosperous and he had ten thousand other arms to back him, we still were daily overmatched; and yet, now that our city is taken and every Phrygian slain


ὅθ' ̔́Εκτορος μὲν εὐτυχοῦντος ἐς δόρυbeen guilty of a murder never matched before? Did you fear that some day he would rear again the fallen walls of Troy ? It seems then you were nothing after all, when, though Hector’s fortunes in the war were prosperous and he had ten thousand other arms to back him, we still were daily overmatched; and yet, now that our city is taken and every Phrygian slain


διωλλύμεσθα μυρίας τ' ἄλλης χερόςbeen guilty of a murder never matched before? Did you fear that some day he would rear again the fallen walls of Troy ? It seems then you were nothing after all, when, though Hector’s fortunes in the war were prosperous and he had ten thousand other arms to back him, we still were daily overmatched; and yet, now that our city is taken and every Phrygian slain


πόλεως δ' ἁλούσης καὶ Φρυγῶν ἐφθαρμένωνbeen guilty of a murder never matched before? Did you fear that some day he would rear again the fallen walls of Troy ? It seems then you were nothing after all, when, though Hector’s fortunes in the war were prosperous and he had ten thousand other arms to back him, we still were daily overmatched; and yet, now that our city is taken and every Phrygian slain


βρέφος τοσόνδ' ἐδείσατ': οὐκ αἰνῶ φόβονyou fear a tender child like this! I do not commend the fear of one who fears but never yet has reasoned out the cause.


ὅστις φοβεῖται μὴ διεξελθὼν λόγῳ.you fear a tender child like this! I do not commend the fear of one who fears but never yet has reasoned out the cause.


ὦ φίλταθ', ὥς σοι θάνατος ἦλθε δυστυχής.you fear a tender child like this! I do not commend the fear of one who fears but never yet has reasoned out the cause.


εἰ μὲν γὰρ ἔθανες πρὸ πόλεως, ἥβης τυχὼνAh! my beloved, yours is a piteous death indeed! If you had died for your city, when you had tasted of the sweets of manhood, of marriage, and of godlike power over others


γάμων τε καὶ τῆς ἰσοθέου τυραννίδοςAh! my beloved, yours is a piteous death indeed! If you had died for your city, when you had tasted of the sweets of manhood, of marriage, and of godlike power over others


μακάριος ἦσθ' ἄν, εἴ τι τῶνδε μακάριον:then were you blessed, if anything here is blessed. But now after one glimpse, one dream of them, you know them no more, my child, and have no joy of them, though heir to all. Ah, poor child! how sadly have your own father’s walls, those towers that Loxias reared, shorn from your head


νῦν δ' αὔτ' ἰδὼν μὲν γνούς τε σῇ ψυχῇ, τέκνονthen were you blessed, if anything here is blessed. But now after one glimpse, one dream of them, you know them no more, my child, and have no joy of them, though heir to all. Ah, poor child! how sadly have your own father’s walls, those towers that Loxias reared, shorn from your head


οὐκ οἶσθ', ἐχρήσω δ' οὐδὲν ἐν δόμοις ἔχων.then were you blessed, if anything here is blessed. But now after one glimpse, one dream of them, you know them no more, my child, and have no joy of them, though heir to all. Ah, poor child! how sadly have your own father’s walls, those towers that Loxias reared, shorn from your head


δύστηνε, κρατὸς ὥς ς' ἔκειρεν ἀθλίωςthen were you blessed, if anything here is blessed. But now after one glimpse, one dream of them, you know them no more, my child, and have no joy of them, though heir to all. Ah, poor child! how sadly have your own father’s walls, those towers that Loxias reared, shorn from your head


τείχη πατρῷα, Λοξίου πυργώματαthen were you blessed, if anything here is blessed. But now after one glimpse, one dream of them, you know them no more, my child, and have no joy of them, though heir to all. Ah, poor child! how sadly have your own father’s walls, those towers that Loxias reared, shorn from your head


ὃν πόλλ' ἐκήπευς' ἡ τεκοῦσα βόστρυχονthe locks your mother fondled, and so often caressed, from which through fractured bones the face of murder grins—briefly to dismiss my shocking theme. O hands, how sweet the likeness you retain of his father, and yet you lie Iimp in your sockets before me!


φιλήμασίν τ' ἔδωκεν, ἔνθεν ἐκγελᾷthe locks your mother fondled, and so often caressed, from which through fractured bones the face of murder grins—briefly to dismiss my shocking theme. O hands, how sweet the likeness you retain of his father, and yet you lie Iimp in your sockets before me!


ὀστέων ῥαγέντων φόνος, ἵν' αἰσχρὰ μὴ λέγω.the locks your mother fondled, and so often caressed, from which through fractured bones the face of murder grins—briefly to dismiss my shocking theme. O hands, how sweet the likeness you retain of his father, and yet you lie Iimp in your sockets before me!


ὦ χεῖρες, ὡς εἰκοὺς μὲν ἡδείας πατρὸςthe locks your mother fondled, and so often caressed, from which through fractured bones the face of murder grins—briefly to dismiss my shocking theme. O hands, how sweet the likeness you retain of his father, and yet you lie Iimp in your sockets before me!


κέκτησθ', ἐν ἄρθροις δ' ἔκλυτοι πρόκεισθέ μοι.the locks your mother fondled, and so often caressed, from which through fractured bones the face of murder grins—briefly to dismiss my shocking theme. O hands, how sweet the likeness you retain of his father, and yet you lie Iimp in your sockets before me!


ὦ πολλὰ κόμπους ἐκβαλὸν φίλον στόμαDear mouth, so often full of words of pride, death has closed you, and you have not kept the promise you made, when nestling in my robe, Ah, mother, many a lock of my hair I will cut off for you, and to your tomb will lead my troops of friends, taking a fond farewell of you.


ὄλωλας, ἐψεύσω μ', ὅτ' ἐσπίπτων πέπλουςDear mouth, so often full of words of pride, death has closed you, and you have not kept the promise you made, when nestling in my robe, Ah, mother, many a lock of my hair I will cut off for you, and to your tomb will lead my troops of friends, taking a fond farewell of you.


̓͂Ω μῆτερ, ηὔδας, ἦ πολύν σοι βοστρύχωνDear mouth, so often full of words of pride, death has closed you, and you have not kept the promise you made, when nestling in my robe, Ah, mother, many a lock of my hair I will cut off for you, and to your tomb will lead my troops of friends, taking a fond farewell of you.


πλόκαμον κεροῦμαι, πρὸς τάφον θ' ὁμηλίκωνDear mouth, so often full of words of pride, death has closed you, and you have not kept the promise you made, when nestling in my robe, Ah, mother, many a lock of my hair I will cut off for you, and to your tomb will lead my troops of friends, taking a fond farewell of you.


κώμους ἀπάξω, φίλα διδοὺς προσφθέγματα.Dear mouth, so often full of words of pride, death has closed you, and you have not kept the promise you made, when nestling in my robe, Ah, mother, many a lock of my hair I will cut off for you, and to your tomb will lead my troops of friends, taking a fond farewell of you.


σὺ δ' οὐκ ἔμ', ἀλλ' ἐγὼ σὲ τὸν νεώτερονBut now I am not to be buried by you, but you, the younger one, a wretched corpse, are buried by me, on whom old age has come with loss of home and children. Ah me, those kisses numberless, the nurture that I gave to you, those sleepless nights—they all are lost! What shall the bard inscribe upon your tomb about you?


γραῦς ἄπολις ἄτεκνος, ἄθλιον θάπτω νεκρόν.But now I am not to be buried by you, but you, the younger one, a wretched corpse, are buried by me, on whom old age has come with loss of home and children. Ah me, those kisses numberless, the nurture that I gave to you, those sleepless nights—they all are lost! What shall the bard inscribe upon your tomb about you?


οἴμοι, τὰ πόλλ' ἀσπάσμαθ' αἵ τ' ἐμαὶ τροφαὶBut now I am not to be buried by you, but you, the younger one, a wretched corpse, are buried by me, on whom old age has come with loss of home and children. Ah me, those kisses numberless, the nurture that I gave to you, those sleepless nights—they all are lost! What shall the bard inscribe upon your tomb about you?


ὕπνοι τ' ἐκεῖνοι φροῦδά μοι. τί καί ποτεBut now I am not to be buried by you, but you, the younger one, a wretched corpse, are buried by me, on whom old age has come with loss of home and children. Ah me, those kisses numberless, the nurture that I gave to you, those sleepless nights—they all are lost! What shall the bard inscribe upon your tomb about you?


γράψειεν ἄν σε μουσοποιὸς ἐν τάφῳ;But now I am not to be buried by you, but you, the younger one, a wretched corpse, are buried by me, on whom old age has come with loss of home and children. Ah me, those kisses numberless, the nurture that I gave to you, those sleepless nights—they all are lost! What shall the bard inscribe upon your tomb about you?


Τὸν παῖδα τόνδ' ἔκτειναν ̓Αργεῖοί ποτεArgives once for fear of him slew this child? Foul shame should that inscription be to Hellas . O child, though you have no part in all your father’s wealth, yet shall you have his brazen shield in which to find a tomb. Ah! shield that kept safe the comely arm of Hector


δείσαντες; — αἰσχρὸν τοὐπίγραμμά γ' ̔Ελλάδι.Argives once for fear of him slew this child? Foul shame should that inscription be to Hellas . O child, though you have no part in all your father’s wealth, yet shall you have his brazen shield in which to find a tomb. Ah! shield that kept safe the comely arm of Hector


ἀλλ' οὖν πατρῴων οὐ λαχὼν ἕξεις ὅμωςArgives once for fear of him slew this child? Foul shame should that inscription be to Hellas . O child, though you have no part in all your father’s wealth, yet shall you have his brazen shield in which to find a tomb. Ah! shield that kept safe the comely arm of Hector


ἐν ᾗ ταφήσῃ χαλκόνωτον ἰτέαν.Argives once for fear of him slew this child? Foul shame should that inscription be to Hellas . O child, though you have no part in all your father’s wealth, yet shall you have his brazen shield in which to find a tomb. Ah! shield that kept safe the comely arm of Hector


ὦ καλλίπηχυν ̔́Εκτορος βραχίοναArgives once for fear of him slew this child? Foul shame should that inscription be to Hellas . O child, though you have no part in all your father’s wealth, yet shall you have his brazen shield in which to find a tomb. Ah! shield that kept safe the comely arm of Hector


σῴζους', ἄριστον φύλακ' ἀπώλεσας σέθεν.now have you lost your valiant keeper! How fair upon your handle lies his imprint, and on the rim that circles around are marks of sweat, that trickled often from Hector’s brow as he pressed it against his beard in battle’s stress.


ὡς ἡδὺς ἐν πόρπακι σῷ κεῖται τύποςnow have you lost your valiant keeper! How fair upon your handle lies his imprint, and on the rim that circles around are marks of sweat, that trickled often from Hector’s brow as he pressed it against his beard in battle’s stress.


ἴτυός τ' ἐν εὐτόρνοισι περιδρόμοις ἱδρώςnow have you lost your valiant keeper! How fair upon your handle lies his imprint, and on the rim that circles around are marks of sweat, that trickled often from Hector’s brow as he pressed it against his beard in battle’s stress.


ὃν ἐκ μετώπου πολλάκις πόνους ἔχωνnow have you lost your valiant keeper! How fair upon your handle lies his imprint, and on the rim that circles around are marks of sweat, that trickled often from Hector’s brow as he pressed it against his beard in battle’s stress.


ἔσταζεν ̔́Εκτωρ προστιθεὶς γενειάδι.now have you lost your valiant keeper! How fair upon your handle lies his imprint, and on the rim that circles around are marks of sweat, that trickled often from Hector’s brow as he pressed it against his beard in battle’s stress.


φέρετε, κομίζετ' ἀθλίῳ κόσμον νεκρῷCome, bring forth, from such store as you have, adornment for the hapless dead, for fortune gives no chance now for lovely offerings; yet of such as I possess, you shall receive these gifts. He is a foolish mortal who thinks his luck secure and so rejoices; for fortune, like a madman in her moods


ἐκ τῶν παρόντων: οὐ γὰρ ἐς κάλλος τύχαςCome, bring forth, from such store as you have, adornment for the hapless dead, for fortune gives no chance now for lovely offerings; yet of such as I possess, you shall receive these gifts. He is a foolish mortal who thinks his luck secure and so rejoices; for fortune, like a madman in her moods


δαίμων δίδωσιν: ὧν δ' ἔχω, λήψῃ τάδε.Come, bring forth, from such store as you have, adornment for the hapless dead, for fortune gives no chance now for lovely offerings; yet of such as I possess, you shall receive these gifts. He is a foolish mortal who thinks his luck secure and so rejoices; for fortune, like a madman in her moods


θνητῶν δὲ μῶρος ὅστις εὖ πράσσειν δοκῶνCome, bring forth, from such store as you have, adornment for the hapless dead, for fortune gives no chance now for lovely offerings; yet of such as I possess, you shall receive these gifts. He is a foolish mortal who thinks his luck secure and so rejoices; for fortune, like a madman in her moods


βέβαια χαίρει: τοῖς τρόποις γὰρ αἱ τύχαιCome, bring forth, from such store as you have, adornment for the hapless dead, for fortune gives no chance now for lovely offerings; yet of such as I possess, you shall receive these gifts. He is a foolish mortal who thinks his luck secure and so rejoices; for fortune, like a madman in her moods


ἔμπληκτος ὡς ἄνθρωπος, ἄλλοτ' ἄλλοσεprings towards this man, then towards that; and no one ever experiences the same unchanging luck. Chorus Leader


πηδῶσι, κοὐδεὶς αὐτὸς εὐτυχεῖ ποτε.prings towards this man, then towards that; and no one ever experiences the same unchanging luck. Chorus Leader


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Euripides, Alcestis, 426-429, 611-612, 614-635, 743-744, 862-863, 866-867, 869-871, 897-902, 911, 916-919, 922, 926-928, 425 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

425. Ho! sirrahs, catch me this woman; hold her fast; for ’tis no welcome story she will have to hear. It was to make thee leave the holy altar of the goddess that I held thy child’s death before thy eyes, and so induced thee to give thyself up to me to die.
2. Euripides, Andromache, 1117-1172, 1176, 1187, 1211, 1218, 1226-1242, 1263-1270, 1116 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1116. εἷς ἦν ἁπάντων τῶνδε μηχανορράφος.
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 1216-1226, 1241, 1285, 1300-1329, 1144 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1144. χωρεῖ δὲ θήρᾳ δυσπότμῳ γαυρουμένη
4. Euripides, Electra, 1277-1280, 1276 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1276. σοὶ μὲν τάδ' εἶπον: τόνδε δ' Αἰγίσθου νέκυν
5. Euripides, Hecuba, 1288, 25-50, 610, 616, 675, 678-680, 684-732, 894-897, 1287 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1287. ̔Εκάβη, σὺ δ', ὦ τάλαινα, διπτύχους νεκροὺς
6. Euripides, Helen, 1243, 1260, 1291-1300, 1390-1395, 1400, 1408, 1419, 1528, 1542-1604, 1240 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1240. τί δ'; ἔστ' ἀπόντων τύμβος; ἢ θάψεις σκιάν; 1240. What? Is there a tomb for the absent? Or will you bury a shadow? Helen
7. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 1027-1045, 1159-1162, 1026 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1026. rend= Bury my body after death in its destined grave in front of the shrine of the virgin goddess Pallas. at Pallene. And I will be thy friend and guardian of thy city for ever, where I lie buried in a foreign soil, but a bitter foe to these children’s descendants, whensoe’er Referring to invasions by the Peloponnesians, descendants of the Heracleidae. with gathered host they come against this land, traitors to your kindness now; such are the strangers ye have championed. Why then came I hither, if I knew all this, instead of regarding the god’s oracle? Because I thought, that Hera was mightier far than any oracle, and would not betray me. Waste no drink-offering on my tomb, nor spill the victim’s blood; for I will requite them for my treatment here with a journey they shall rue; and ye shall have double gain from me, for I will help you and harm them by my death. Alcmena 1026. Slay me, I do not ask thee for mercy; yet since this city let me go and shrunk from slaying me, I will reward it with an old oracle of Loxias, which in time will benefit them more than doth appear.
8. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1359-1366, 1358 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Medea, 1378-1383, 1377 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1377. Give up to me those dead, to bury and lament Medea
10. Euripides, Orestes, 1431-1436, 1532, 97-99, 114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1486-1529, 1485 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1485. I do not veil my tender cheek shaded with curls, nor do I feel shame, from maiden modesty, at the dark red beneath my eyes, the blush upon my face, as I hurry on, in bacchic revelry for the dead
12. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 755-759, 778-836, 841-843, 846-931, 934-935, 950-954, 754 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

754. Are ye bringing the bodies, for the which the strife arose? Messenger
13. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1134-1146, 1157-1206, 1240-1245, 1248-1250, 735-739, 1133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetiology Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
agave Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 274
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
apsines Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
cadmus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
euripides, exodos (missing part/lacuna) of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
funerals Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hecuba Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
iphigenia in tauris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
mêchanê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
nomos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
odyssey Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 274
on stage Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
pity (ἔλεος) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
poe, j.p. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 274
reconstruction, of the ending of bacchae' Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 211
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 274, 834
weddings Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834