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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5640
Euripides, Suppliant Women, 990-1000


πρός ς' ἔβαν δρομὰς ἐξ ἐμῶνNow from my home in frantic haste with frenzied mind I rush to join thee, seeking to share with thee the fire’s bright flame and the self-same tomb, to rid me of my weary


τί φέγγος, τίν' αἴγλανWhat light, what radiancy did the sun-god’s car dart forth, and the moon athwart the firmament, while round her in the gloom swift stars None of the proposed emendations of this corrupt passage are convincing. Hermann’s λάμπαι δ’ ὠκύθοοί νιν ἀμφιππεύουσι is here followed. Nauck has λαμπαδ’ ἱν’ ὠκυθόαι νύμφαι ἱππεύουσι . careered


ἐδίφρευε τόθ' ἅλιοςWhat light, what radiancy did the sun-god’s car dart forth, and the moon athwart the firmament, while round her in the gloom swift stars None of the proposed emendations of this corrupt passage are convincing. Hermann’s λάμπαι δ’ ὠκύθοοί νιν ἀμφιππεύουσι is here followed. Nauck has λαμπαδ’ ἱν’ ὠκυθόαι νύμφαι ἱππεύουσι . careered


σελάνα τε κατ' αἰθέραWhat light, what radiancy did the sun-god’s car dart forth, and the moon athwart the firmament, while round her in the gloom swift stars None of the proposed emendations of this corrupt passage are convincing. Hermann’s λάμπαι δ’ ὠκύθοοί νιν ἀμφιππεύουσι is here followed. Nauck has λαμπαδ’ ἱν’ ὠκυθόαι νύμφαι ἱππεύουσι . careered


†λαμπάδ' ἵν' ὠκυθόαι νύμφαι†What light, what radiancy did the sun-god’s car dart forth, and the moon athwart the firmament, while round her in the gloom swift stars None of the proposed emendations of this corrupt passage are convincing. Hermann’s λάμπαι δ’ ὠκύθοοί νιν ἀμφιππεύουσι is here followed. Nauck has λαμπαδ’ ἱν’ ὠκυθόαι νύμφαι ἱππεύουσι . careered


ἱππεύουσι δι' ὀρφναίαςWhat light, what radiancy did the sun-god’s car dart forth, and the moon athwart the firmament, while round her in the gloom swift stars None of the proposed emendations of this corrupt passage are convincing. Hermann’s λάμπαι δ’ ὠκύθοοί νιν ἀμφιππεύουσι is here followed. Nauck has λαμπαδ’ ἱν’ ὠκυθόαι νύμφαι ἱππεύουσι . careered


ἁνίκα γάμων γάμωνin the day that the city of Argos raised the stately chant of joy at my wedding, in honour of my marriage with mail-clad Capaneus?


τῶν ἐμῶν πόλις ̓́Αργουςin the day that the city of Argos raised the stately chant of joy at my wedding, in honour of my marriage with mail-clad Capaneus?


ἀοιδάς, εὐδαιμονίαςin the day that the city of Argos raised the stately chant of joy at my wedding, in honour of my marriage with mail-clad Capaneus?


ἐπύργωσε καὶ γαμέταin the day that the city of Argos raised the stately chant of joy at my wedding, in honour of my marriage with mail-clad Capaneus?


χαλκεοτευχοῦς, αἰαῖ, Καπανέως.in the day that the city of Argos raised the stately chant of joy at my wedding, in honour of my marriage with mail-clad Capaneus?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 8.266-8.366 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 281-283, 280 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

280. οὗτος αὐτός ἐστιν, οὗτος.
3. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1485, 1506, 1508-1509, 1484 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1484. ἀλλ' ὡς τάχιστ' ἐμπιμπράναι τὴν οἰκίαν
4. Euripides, Alcestis, 323, 180 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

180. that is, all who care to live an honourable life. Choru
5. Euripides, Bacchae, 1199, 184, 190, 21-22, 220, 322-323, 482, 511, 566-567, 86, 862, 87, 1154 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1154. ἀναβοάσωμεν ξυμφορὰν
6. Euripides, Electra, 170-190, 823, 169 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

169. σὰν ἀγρότειραν αὐλάν.
7. Euripides, Hecuba, 1077 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1077. Βάκχαις ̔́Αιδου διαμοιρᾶσαι
8. Euripides, Hippolytus, 528-529, 54-87, 240 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

240. Whither have I strayed, my senses leaving? Mad, mad! stricken by some demon’s curse! Woe is me! Cover my head again, nurse. Shame fills me for the words I have spoken.
9. Euripides, Ion, 136-140, 126 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Orestes, 193, 1522 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1522. A slave, and yet you fear death, which will release you from trouble? Phrygian
11. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1104-1140, 1175, 214-228, 638-649, 657-689, 1099 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1002-1113, 1132, 1143, 1146-1150, 1156-1157, 222, 224, 798-836, 980-999, 1001 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1278, 1281, 1291-1292, 308-310, 320-325, 327-328, 332-333, 606, 914-922, 1277 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Herodotus, Histories, 1.31-1.32, 6.118, 8.51-8.55, 8.96 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.31. When Solon had provoked him by saying that the affairs of Tellus were so fortunate, Croesus asked who he thought was next, fully expecting to win second prize. Solon answered, “Cleobis and Biton. ,They were of Argive stock, had enough to live on, and on top of this had great bodily strength. Both had won prizes in the athletic contests, and this story is told about them: there was a festival of Hera in Argos, and their mother absolutely had to be conveyed to the temple by a team of oxen. But their oxen had not come back from the fields in time, so the youths took the yoke upon their own shoulders under constraint of time. They drew the wagon, with their mother riding atop it, traveling five miles until they arrived at the temple. ,When they had done this and had been seen by the entire gathering, their lives came to an excellent end, and in their case the god made clear that for human beings it is a better thing to die than to live. The Argive men stood around the youths and congratulated them on their strength; the Argive women congratulated their mother for having borne such children. ,She was overjoyed at the feat and at the praise, so she stood before the image and prayed that the goddess might grant the best thing for man to her children Cleobis and Biton, who had given great honor to the goddess. ,After this prayer they sacrificed and feasted. The youths then lay down in the temple and went to sleep and never rose again; death held them there. The Argives made and dedicated at Delphi statues of them as being the best of men.” 1.32. Thus Solon granted second place in happiness to these men. Croesus was vexed and said, “My Athenian guest, do you so much despise our happiness that you do not even make us worth as much as common men?” Solon replied, “Croesus, you ask me about human affairs, and I know that the divine is entirely grudging and troublesome to us. ,In a long span of time it is possible to see many things that you do not want to, and to suffer them, too. I set the limit of a man's life at seventy years; ,these seventy years have twenty-five thousand, two hundred days, leaving out the intercalary month. But if you make every other year longer by one month, so that the seasons agree opportunely, then there are thirty-five intercalary months during the seventy years, and from these months there are one thousand fifty days. ,Out of all these days in the seventy years, all twenty-six thousand, two hundred and fifty of them, not one brings anything at all like another. So, Croesus, man is entirely chance. ,To me you seem to be very rich and to be king of many people, but I cannot answer your question before I learn that you ended your life well. The very rich man is not more fortunate than the man who has only his daily needs, unless he chances to end his life with all well. Many very rich men are unfortunate, many of moderate means are lucky. ,The man who is very rich but unfortunate surpasses the lucky man in only two ways, while the lucky surpasses the rich but unfortunate in many. The rich man is more capable of fulfilling his appetites and of bearing a great disaster that falls upon him, and it is in these ways that he surpasses the other. The lucky man is not so able to support disaster or appetite as is the rich man, but his luck keeps these things away from him, and he is free from deformity and disease, has no experience of evils, and has fine children and good looks. ,If besides all this he ends his life well, then he is the one whom you seek, the one worthy to be called fortunate. But refrain from calling him fortunate before he dies; call him lucky. ,It is impossible for one who is only human to obtain all these things at the same time, just as no land is self-sufficient in what it produces. Each country has one thing but lacks another; whichever has the most is the best. Just so no human being is self-sufficient; each person has one thing but lacks another. ,Whoever passes through life with the most and then dies agreeably is the one who, in my opinion, O King, deserves to bear this name. It is necessary to see how the end of every affair turns out, for the god promises fortune to many people and then utterly ruins them.” 6.118. Datis journeyed with his army to Asia, and when he arrived at Myconos he saw a vision in his sleep. What that vision was is not told, but as soon as day broke Datis made a search of his ships. He found in a Phoenician ship a gilded image of Apollo, and asked where this plunder had been taken. Learning from what temple it had come, he sailed in his own ship to Delos. ,The Delians had now returned to their island, and Datis set the image in the temple, instructing the Delians to carry it away to Theban Delium, on the coast opposite Chalcis. ,Datis gave this order and sailed away, but the Delians never carried that statue away; twenty years later the Thebans brought it to Delium by command of an oracle. 8.51. Since the crossing of the Hellespont, where the barbarians began their journey, they had spent one month there crossing into Europe and in three more months were in Attica, when Calliades was archon at Athens. ,When they took the town it was deserted, but in the sacred precinct they found a few Athenians, stewards of the sacred precinct and poor people, who defended themselves against the assault by fencing the acropolis with doors and logs. They had not withdrawn to Salamis not only because of poverty but also because they thought they had discovered the meaning of the oracle the Pythia had given, namely that the wooden wall would be impregnable. They believed that according to the oracle this, not the ships, was the refuge. 8.52. The Persians took up a position on the hill opposite the acropolis, which the Athenians call the Areopagus, and besieged them in this way: they wrapped arrows in tar and set them on fire, and then shot them at the barricade. Still the besieged Athenians defended themselves, although they had come to the utmost danger and their barricade had failed them. ,When the Pisistratids proposed terms of surrender, they would not listen but contrived defenses such as rolling down boulders onto the barbarians when they came near the gates. For a long time Xerxes was at a loss, unable to capture them. 8.53. In time a way out of their difficulties was revealed to the barbarians, since according to the oracle all the mainland of Attica had to become subject to the Persians. In front of the acropolis, and behind the gates and the ascent, was a place where no one was on guard, since no one thought any man could go up that way. Here some men climbed up, near the sacred precinct of Cecrops' daughter Aglaurus, although the place was a sheer cliff. ,When the Athenians saw that they had ascended to the acropolis, some threw themselves off the wall and were killed, and others fled into the chamber. The Persians who had come up first turned to the gates, opened them, and murdered the suppliants. When they had levelled everything, they plundered the sacred precinct and set fire to the entire acropolis. 8.54. So it was that Xerxes took complete possession of Athens, and he sent a horseman to Susa to announce his present success to Artabanus. On the day after the messenger was sent, he called together the Athenian exiles who accompanied him and asked them go up to the acropolis and perform sacrifices in their customary way, an order given because he had been inspired by a dream or because he felt remorse after burning the sacred precinct. The Athenian exiles did as they were commanded. 8.55. I will tell why I have mentioned this. In that acropolis is a shrine of Erechtheus, called the “Earthborn,” and in the shrine are an olive tree and a pool of salt water. The story among the Athenians is that they were set there by Poseidon and Athena as tokens when they contended for the land. It happened that the olive tree was burnt by the barbarians with the rest of the sacred precinct, but on the day after its burning, when the Athenians ordered by the king to sacrifice went up to the sacred precinct, they saw a shoot of about a cubit's length sprung from the stump, and they reported this. 8.96. When the battle was broken off, the Hellenes towed to Salamis as many of the wrecks as were still there and kept ready for another battle, supposing that the king could still make use of his surviving ships. ,A west wind had caught many of the wrecks and carried them to the shore in Attica called Colias. Thus not only was all the rest of the oracle fulfilled which Bacis and Musaeus had spoken about this battle, but also what had been said many years before this in an oracle by Lysistratus, an Athenian soothsayer, concerning the wrecks carried to shore there. Its meaning had eluded all the Hellenes: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"The Colian women will cook with oars. /l lBut this was to happen after the king had marched away. /l /quote
15. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1173 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1173. my release from the toils laid upon me would be accomplished. And I expected prosperous days, but the meaning, it seems, was only that I would die. For toil comes no more to the dead. Since, then, my son, those words are clearly finding their fulfillment
16. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 3.21-3.22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Statius, Thebais, 10.674-10.675, 10.683-10.685, 10.688, 10.699-10.719, 10.721, 10.736-10.737, 10.756-10.797, 10.801, 10.806-10.813, 10.817-10.818, 12.777-12.809 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 249 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

19. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, 1.179-1.181, 10.464-10.482, 11.415-11.419, 14.47-14.57, 14.582-14.587



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accused/defendant Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
aeneas Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
agamemnon, seven against thebes Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
alterity/otherness Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
anthropomorphism, conflation/split of divine image with cosmic principle Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
aphrodite, dual anthropomorphic and cosmic nature of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
aphrodite Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
apollo Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
argonautica Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
argos Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206
arson Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
artemis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
athena Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
athens Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
bacchae Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 838
beating Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
capaneus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208; Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
chaerephon Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
chase Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
chresmologoi Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 206
croton Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
cultural isolation Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
datis, persians general, dreams of Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 206
death, in suppliant women Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67, 68, 69, 135
death, oration for argive corpses, in suppliant women Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 135
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
demeter Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
deuotio Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
dionysia, city (great) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836, 838
dionysus, dionysiac (rites, farce etc.) Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
eleusis Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206
eros, confession of phaedra in hippolytus on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
eros, isolation/otherness and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
eros, language and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 68, 69
eros, self, dispossession of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67, 68, 69
eros, self-immolation of evadne in suppliant women and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67, 68, 69, 135
eros, sophia and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
eteocles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
euadne Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 24
eupsykhia (bravery) Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 135
euripides, suppliants Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
evadne Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208; Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
father-beating Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
funerals Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
giants Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
helen Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
henrichs, a. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
hephaestus Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
hitting Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
homicide/murder, cf. killer, murderer Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
ion Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
killing Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
komos, komast, komastic Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
language, eros and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 68, 69
language, otherness and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
lysistratus of athens Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 206
makarismos Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 24
menelaus Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
menoeceus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
morality Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
music/song, self-immolation of evadne in suppliant women and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 68
naples, bilingualism in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
nymphs Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
oaths Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
oedipus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
oenone Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
offend, cf. insult Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
olympian gods, intervention in narrative Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
otherness/alterity Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
oxymora Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
paris, relationship with oenone Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
persephone Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 69
pheidippides Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
pietas Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 207, 208
polynices Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
pythagoras Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
reflectory/phrontisterion/thinkery Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
rehm, r. Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 135
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836, 838
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836, 838
sacrilege/asebeia Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
seaford, richard Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 68
siluae, imperialism in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 208
similes, use in the posthomerica Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132
slave Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
socrates Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 135; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
sophia, wisdom eros and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
statius, and euripides Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
statius, and greek tragedy Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
statius, father of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
strepsiades Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
suppliant women oration for argive corpses Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 135
suppliant women self-immolation of evadne in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67, 68, 69, 135
the trace' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 67
thebes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
theseus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 206, 207, 208
troy Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
vengeance Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
virtus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 207, 208
weddings Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 836
xanthias Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 307
xerxes of persia, dreams of Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 206
zeus, thunder and lightning of Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 132