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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5640
Euripides, Suppliant Women, 955-989


οὐκέτ' εὔτεκνος, οὐκέτ' εὔ-No more a happy mother I, with children blest; no more I share, among Argive women, who have sons, their happy lot; nor any more will Artemis in the hour of travail kindly greet these childless mothers.


παις, οὐδ' εὐτυχίας μέτε-No more a happy mother I, with children blest; no more I share, among Argive women, who have sons, their happy lot; nor any more will Artemis in the hour of travail kindly greet these childless mothers.


στίν μοι κουροτόκοις ἐν ̓Αργείαις:No more a happy mother I, with children blest; no more I share, among Argive women, who have sons, their happy lot; nor any more will Artemis in the hour of travail kindly greet these childless mothers.


οὐδ' ̓́Αρτεμις λοχίαNo more a happy mother I, with children blest; no more I share, among Argive women, who have sons, their happy lot; nor any more will Artemis in the hour of travail kindly greet these childless mothers.


προσφθέγξαιτ' ἂν τὰς ἀτέκνους.No more a happy mother I, with children blest; no more I share, among Argive women, who have sons, their happy lot; nor any more will Artemis in the hour of travail kindly greet these childless mothers.


δυσαίων δ' ὁ βίοςMost dreary is my life, and like some wandering cloud I drift before the howling blast. Choru


πλαγκτὰ δ' ὡσεί τις νεφέλαMost dreary is my life, and like some wandering cloud I drift before the howling blast. Choru


πνευμάτων ὑπὸ δυσχίμων ἀίσσω.Most dreary is my life, and like some wandering cloud I drift before the howling blast. Choru


ἑπτὰ ματέρες ἑπτὰ κού-The seven noblest sons in Argos once we had


ρους ἐγεινάμεθ' αἱ ταλαί-The seven noblest sons in Argos once we had


πωροι κλεινοτάτους ἐν ̓Αργείοις:we seven hapless mothers; but now my sons are dead, I have no child, and on me steals old age in piteous wise, nor ’mongst the dead nor ’mongst the living do I count Dindorf, followed by Nauck, reads κρινομένα . myself


καὶ νῦν ἄπαις ἄτεκνοςwe seven hapless mothers; but now my sons are dead, I have no child, and on me steals old age in piteous wise, nor ’mongst the dead nor ’mongst the living do I count Dindorf, followed by Nauck, reads κρινομένα . myself


γηράσκω δυστανοτάτωςwe seven hapless mothers; but now my sons are dead, I have no child, and on me steals old age in piteous wise, nor ’mongst the dead nor ’mongst the living do I count Dindorf, followed by Nauck, reads κρινομένα . myself


οὔτ' ἐν φθιμένοιςwe seven hapless mothers; but now my sons are dead, I have no child, and on me steals old age in piteous wise, nor ’mongst the dead nor ’mongst the living do I count Dindorf, followed by Nauck, reads κρινομένα . myself


οὔτ' ἐν ζωοῖσιν †ἀριθμουμένη†we seven hapless mothers; but now my sons are dead, I have no child, and on me steals old age in piteous wise, nor ’mongst the dead nor ’mongst the living do I count Dindorf, followed by Nauck, reads κρινομένα . myself


χωρὶς δή τινα τῶνδ' ἔχουσα μοῖραν.having as it were a lot apart from these. Choru


ὑπολελειμμένα μοι δάκρυα:Tears alone are left me; in my house sad memories of my son are stored; mournful tresses shorn from his head, chaplets that he wore, libations for the dead departed


μέλεα παιδὸς ἐν οἴκοιςTears alone are left me; in my house sad memories of my son are stored; mournful tresses shorn from his head, chaplets that he wore, libations for the dead departed


κεῖται μνήματα, πένθιμοιTears alone are left me; in my house sad memories of my son are stored; mournful tresses shorn from his head, chaplets that he wore, libations for the dead departed


κουραὶ καὶ στέφανοι κόμαςTears alone are left me; in my house sad memories of my son are stored; mournful tresses shorn from his head, chaplets that he wore, libations for the dead departed


λοιβαί τε νεκύων φθιμένωνand songs, but not such as golden-haired Apollo welcometh; and when I wake to weep, my tears will ever drench the folds of my robe upon my bosom. Choru


ἀοιδαί θ' ἃς χρυσοκόμαςand songs, but not such as golden-haired Apollo welcometh; and when I wake to weep, my tears will ever drench the folds of my robe upon my bosom. Choru


̓Απόλλων οὐκ ἐνδέχεται:and songs, but not such as golden-haired Apollo welcometh; and when I wake to weep, my tears will ever drench the folds of my robe upon my bosom. Choru


γόοισι δ' ὀρθρευομέναand songs, but not such as golden-haired Apollo welcometh; and when I wake to weep, my tears will ever drench the folds of my robe upon my bosom. Choru


δάκρυσι νοτερὸν ἀεὶ πέπλωνand songs, but not such as golden-haired Apollo welcometh; and when I wake to weep, my tears will ever drench the folds of my robe upon my bosom. Choru


πρὸς στέρνῳ πτύχα τέγξω.and songs, but not such as golden-haired Apollo welcometh; and when I wake to weep, my tears will ever drench the folds of my robe upon my bosom. Choru


καὶ μὴν θαλάμας τάσδ' ἐσορῶ δὴAh! there I see the sepulchre ready e’en now for Capaneus, his consecrated tomb, and the votive offerings Theseus gives unto the dead outside the shrine, and nigh yon lightning-smitten chief


Καπανέως ἤδη τύμβον θ' ἱερὸνAh! there I see the sepulchre ready e’en now for Capaneus, his consecrated tomb, and the votive offerings Theseus gives unto the dead outside the shrine, and nigh yon lightning-smitten chief


μελάθρων τ' ἐκτὸςAh! there I see the sepulchre ready e’en now for Capaneus, his consecrated tomb, and the votive offerings Theseus gives unto the dead outside the shrine, and nigh yon lightning-smitten chief


Θησέως ἀναθήματα νεκροῖςAh! there I see the sepulchre ready e’en now for Capaneus, his consecrated tomb, and the votive offerings Theseus gives unto the dead outside the shrine, and nigh yon lightning-smitten chief


κλεινήν τ' ἄλοχον τοῦ καπφθιμένουAh! there I see the sepulchre ready e’en now for Capaneus, his consecrated tomb, and the votive offerings Theseus gives unto the dead outside the shrine, and nigh yon lightning-smitten chief


τοῦδε κεραυνῷ πέλας ΕὐάδνηνI see his noble bride, Evadne, daughter of King Iphis. Wherefore stands she on the towering rock, which o’ertops this temple, advancing along yon path? Evadne


ἣν ̓͂Ιφις ἄναξ παῖδα φυτεύει.I see his noble bride, Evadne, daughter of King Iphis. Wherefore stands she on the towering rock, which o’ertops this temple, advancing along yon path? Evadne


τί ποτ' αἰθερίαν ἕστηκε πέτρανI see his noble bride, Evadne, daughter of King Iphis. Wherefore stands she on the towering rock, which o’ertops this temple, advancing along yon path? Evadne


ἣ τῶνδε δόμων ὑπερακρίζειI see his noble bride, Evadne, daughter of King Iphis. Wherefore stands she on the towering rock, which o’ertops this temple, advancing along yon path? Evadne


τήνδ' ἐμβαίνουσα κέλευθον;I see his noble bride, Evadne, daughter of King Iphis. Wherefore stands she on the towering rock, which o’ertops this temple, advancing along yon path? Evadne


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6.17 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1055-1056, 1072-1079, 202, 286-364, 399-462, 778-836, 857-924, 956-989, 1054 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1054. Why dost thou deck thyself in that apparel? Evadne
3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 4.92-4.99 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aesthetics of embodiment Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 768
aethra Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
andromeda Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 195
athena Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 128
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 195
bellerophon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 195
death, rescue of argive corpses, in suppliant women Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 128, 129
deus ex machina Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 128
dramatic festivals, discursive parameters Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
euripides suppliant women, dating Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
euripides suppliant women, interpretation Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
impiety Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
justice Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 128
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 195
morwood, j. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 195
oxymora' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 128
oxymora Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 129
skênê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 195
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 195, 768
suppliant women rescue of argive corpses Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 128, 129
worman, n. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 768