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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5640
Euripides, Suppliant Women, 857-917


ἄκουε δή νυν: καὶ γὰρ οὐκ ἄκοντί μοιHearken then. For in giving this task to me thou findest a willing eulogist of friends, whose praise I would declare in all truth and sincerity.


δίδως ἔπαινον ὧν ἔγωγε βούλομαιHearken then. For in giving this task to me thou findest a willing eulogist of friends, whose praise I would declare in all truth and sincerity.


φίλων ἀληθῆ καὶ δίκαι' εἰπεῖν πέρι.Hearken then. For in giving this task to me thou findest a willing eulogist of friends, whose praise I would declare in all truth and sincerity.


ὁρᾷς τὸν ἁβρόν, οὗ βέλος διέπτατο;Dost see yon corpse by Zeus’s bolt transfixed? That is Capaneus; though he had ample wealth, yet was he the last to boast of his prosperity; nor would he ever vaunt himself above a poorer neighbour, but shunned the man whose sumptuous board had puffed him up too high


Καπανεὺς ὅδ' ἐστίν: ᾧ βίος μὲν ἦν πολύςDost see yon corpse by Zeus’s bolt transfixed? That is Capaneus; though he had ample wealth, yet was he the last to boast of his prosperity; nor would he ever vaunt himself above a poorer neighbour, but shunned the man whose sumptuous board had puffed him up too high


ἥκιστα δ' ὄλβῳ γαῦρος ἦν: φρόνημα δὲDost see yon corpse by Zeus’s bolt transfixed? That is Capaneus; though he had ample wealth, yet was he the last to boast of his prosperity; nor would he ever vaunt himself above a poorer neighbour, but shunned the man whose sumptuous board had puffed him up too high


οὐδέν τι μεῖζον εἶχεν ἢ πένης ἀνήρDost see yon corpse by Zeus’s bolt transfixed? That is Capaneus; though he had ample wealth, yet was he the last to boast of his prosperity; nor would he ever vaunt himself above a poorer neighbour, but shunned the man whose sumptuous board had puffed him up too high


φεύγων τραπέζαις ὅστις ἐξογκοῖτ' ἄγανDost see yon corpse by Zeus’s bolt transfixed? That is Capaneus; though he had ample wealth, yet was he the last to boast of his prosperity; nor would he ever vaunt himself above a poorer neighbour, but shunned the man whose sumptuous board had puffed him up too high


τἀρκοῦντ' ἀτίζων: οὐ γὰρ ἐν γαστρὸς βορᾷand made him scorn mere competence, for he held that virtue lies not in greedy gluttony, but that moderate means suffice. True friend was he, alike to present or to absent friends the same; of such the number is not great. His was a guileless character


τὸ χρηστὸν εἶναι, μέτρια δ' ἐξαρκεῖν ἔφη.and made him scorn mere competence, for he held that virtue lies not in greedy gluttony, but that moderate means suffice. True friend was he, alike to present or to absent friends the same; of such the number is not great. His was a guileless character


φίλοις τ' ἀληθὴς ἦν φίλος, παροῦσί τεand made him scorn mere competence, for he held that virtue lies not in greedy gluttony, but that moderate means suffice. True friend was he, alike to present or to absent friends the same; of such the number is not great. His was a guileless character


καὶ μὴ παροῦσιν: ὧν ἀριθμὸς οὐ πολύς.and made him scorn mere competence, for he held that virtue lies not in greedy gluttony, but that moderate means suffice. True friend was he, alike to present or to absent friends the same; of such the number is not great. His was a guileless character


ἀψευδὲς ἦθος, εὐπροσήγορον στόμαand made him scorn mere competence, for he held that virtue lies not in greedy gluttony, but that moderate means suffice. True friend was he, alike to present or to absent friends the same; of such the number is not great. His was a guileless character


ἄκραντον οὐδὲν οὔτ' ἐς οἰκέτας ἔχωνa courteous address, that left no promise unperformed either towards his own household or his fellow-citizens. The next I name is Eteocles; a master he of other kinds of excellence; young, nor richly dowered with store, yet high in honour in the Argive land.


οὔτ' ἐς πολίτας. τὸν δὲ δεύτερον λέγωa courteous address, that left no promise unperformed either towards his own household or his fellow-citizens. The next I name is Eteocles; a master he of other kinds of excellence; young, nor richly dowered with store, yet high in honour in the Argive land.


̓Ετέοκλον, ἄλλην χρηστότητ' ἠσκηκότα:a courteous address, that left no promise unperformed either towards his own household or his fellow-citizens. The next I name is Eteocles; a master he of other kinds of excellence; young, nor richly dowered with store, yet high in honour in the Argive land.


νεανίας ἦν τῷ βίῳ μὲν ἐνδεήςa courteous address, that left no promise unperformed either towards his own household or his fellow-citizens. The next I name is Eteocles; a master he of other kinds of excellence; young, nor richly dowered with store, yet high in honour in the Argive land.


πλείστας δὲ τιμὰς ἔσχ' ἐν ̓Αργείᾳ χθονί.a courteous address, that left no promise unperformed either towards his own household or his fellow-citizens. The next I name is Eteocles; a master he of other kinds of excellence; young, nor richly dowered with store, yet high in honour in the Argive land.


φίλων δὲ χρυσὸν πολλάκις δωρουμένωνAnd though his friends oft offered gifts of gold, he would not have it in his house, to make his character its slave by taking wealth’s yoke upon him. Not his city, but those that sinned against her did he hate, for a city is no wise to be blamed


οὐκ εἰσεδέξατ' οἶκον ὥστε τοὺς τρόπουςAnd though his friends oft offered gifts of gold, he would not have it in his house, to make his character its slave by taking wealth’s yoke upon him. Not his city, but those that sinned against her did he hate, for a city is no wise to be blamed


δούλους παρασχεῖν χρημάτων ζευχθεὶς ὕπο.And though his friends oft offered gifts of gold, he would not have it in his house, to make his character its slave by taking wealth’s yoke upon him. Not his city, but those that sinned against her did he hate, for a city is no wise to be blamed


τοὺς δ' ἐξαμαρτάνοντας, οὐχὶ τὴν πόλινAnd though his friends oft offered gifts of gold, he would not have it in his house, to make his character its slave by taking wealth’s yoke upon him. Not his city, but those that sinned against her did he hate, for a city is no wise to be blamed


ἤχθαιρ': ἐπεί τοι κοὐδὲν αἰτία πόλιςAnd though his friends oft offered gifts of gold, he would not have it in his house, to make his character its slave by taking wealth’s yoke upon him. Not his city, but those that sinned against her did he hate, for a city is no wise to be blamed


κακῶς κλύουσα διὰ κυβερνήτην κακόν.if it get an evil name by reason of an evil governor.


ὁ δ' αὖ τρίτος τῶνδ' ̔Ιππομέδων τοιόσδ' ἔφυ:Such another was Hippomedon, third of all this band; from his very boyhood he refrained from turning towards the allurements of the Muses, to lead a life of ease; his home was in the fields, and gladly would he school his nature to hardship


παῖς ὢν ἐτόλμης' εὐθὺς οὐ πρὸς ἡδονὰςSuch another was Hippomedon, third of all this band; from his very boyhood he refrained from turning towards the allurements of the Muses, to lead a life of ease; his home was in the fields, and gladly would he school his nature to hardship


Μουσῶν τραπέσθαι πρὸς τὸ μαλθακὸν βίουSuch another was Hippomedon, third of all this band; from his very boyhood he refrained from turning towards the allurements of the Muses, to lead a life of ease; his home was in the fields, and gladly would he school his nature to hardship


ἀγροὺς δὲ ναίων, σκληρὰ τῇ φύσει διδοὺςSuch another was Hippomedon, third of all this band; from his very boyhood he refrained from turning towards the allurements of the Muses, to lead a life of ease; his home was in the fields, and gladly would he school his nature to hardship


ἔχαιρε πρὸς τἀνδρεῖον, ἔς τ' ἄγρας ἰὼνwith a view to manliness, aye hasting to the chase, rejoicing in his steeds or straining of his bow, because he would make himself of use unto his state. Next behold the huntress Atalanta’s son, Parthenopaeus, a youth of peerless beauty;


ἵπποις τε χαίρων τόξα τ' ἐντείνων χεροῖνwith a view to manliness, aye hasting to the chase, rejoicing in his steeds or straining of his bow, because he would make himself of use unto his state. Next behold the huntress Atalanta’s son, Parthenopaeus, a youth of peerless beauty;


πόλει παρασχεῖν σῶμα χρήσιμον θέλων.with a view to manliness, aye hasting to the chase, rejoicing in his steeds or straining of his bow, because he would make himself of use unto his state. Next behold the huntress Atalanta’s son, Parthenopaeus, a youth of peerless beauty;


ὁ τῆς κυναγοῦ δ' ἄλλος ̓Αταλάντης γόνοςwith a view to manliness, aye hasting to the chase, rejoicing in his steeds or straining of his bow, because he would make himself of use unto his state. Next behold the huntress Atalanta’s son, Parthenopaeus, a youth of peerless beauty;


παῖς Παρθενοπαῖος, εἶδος ἐξοχώτατοςwith a view to manliness, aye hasting to the chase, rejoicing in his steeds or straining of his bow, because he would make himself of use unto his state. Next behold the huntress Atalanta’s son, Parthenopaeus, a youth of peerless beauty;


̓Αρκὰς μὲν ἦν, ἐλθὼν δ' ἐπ' ̓Ινάχου ῥοὰςfrom Arcady he came even to the streams of Inachus, and in Argos spent his boyhood. There, when he grew to man’s estate, first, as is the duty of strangers settled in another land, he showed no pique or jealousy against the state, became no quibbler, chiefest source of annoyance


παιδεύεται κατ' ̓́Αργος. ἐκτραφεὶς δ' ἐκεῖfrom Arcady he came even to the streams of Inachus, and in Argos spent his boyhood. There, when he grew to man’s estate, first, as is the duty of strangers settled in another land, he showed no pique or jealousy against the state, became no quibbler, chiefest source of annoyance


πρῶτον μέν, ὡς χρὴ τοὺς μετοικοῦντας ξένουςfrom Arcady he came even to the streams of Inachus, and in Argos spent his boyhood. There, when he grew to man’s estate, first, as is the duty of strangers settled in another land, he showed no pique or jealousy against the state, became no quibbler, chiefest source of annoyance


λυπηρὸς οὐκ ἦν οὐδ' ἐπίφθονος πόλειfrom Arcady he came even to the streams of Inachus, and in Argos spent his boyhood. There, when he grew to man’s estate, first, as is the duty of strangers settled in another land, he showed no pique or jealousy against the state, became no quibbler, chiefest source of annoyance


οὐδ' ἐξεριστὴς τῶν λόγων, ὅθεν βαρὺςfrom Arcady he came even to the streams of Inachus, and in Argos spent his boyhood. There, when he grew to man’s estate, first, as is the duty of strangers settled in another land, he showed no pique or jealousy against the state, became no quibbler, chiefest source of annoyance


μάλιστ' ἂν εἴη δημότης τε καὶ ξένος.citizen or stranger can give, but took his stand amid the host, and fought for Argos as he were her own son, glad at heart whenso the city prospered, deeply grieved if e’er reverses came; many Dindorf regards this line as an interpolation. a lover though he had midst men and maids


λόχοις δ' ἐνεστὼς ὥσπερ ̓Αργεῖος γεγὼςcitizen or stranger can give, but took his stand amid the host, and fought for Argos as he were her own son, glad at heart whenso the city prospered, deeply grieved if e’er reverses came; many Dindorf regards this line as an interpolation. a lover though he had midst men and maids


ἤμυνε χώρᾳ, χὡπότ' εὖ πράσσοι πόλιςcitizen or stranger can give, but took his stand amid the host, and fought for Argos as he were her own son, glad at heart whenso the city prospered, deeply grieved if e’er reverses came; many Dindorf regards this line as an interpolation. a lover though he had midst men and maids


ἔχαιρε, λυπρῶς δ' ἔφερεν, εἴ τι δυστυχοῖ.citizen or stranger can give, but took his stand amid the host, and fought for Argos as he were her own son, glad at heart whenso the city prospered, deeply grieved if e’er reverses came; many Dindorf regards this line as an interpolation. a lover though he had midst men and maids


πολλοὺς δ' ἐραστὰς κἀπὸ θηλειῶν ὅσαςcitizen or stranger can give, but took his stand amid the host, and fought for Argos as he were her own son, glad at heart whenso the city prospered, deeply grieved if e’er reverses came; many Dindorf regards this line as an interpolation. a lover though he had midst men and maids


ἔχων ἐφρούρει μηδὲν ἐξαμαρτάνειν.yet was he careful to avoid offence.


Τυδέως δ' ἔπαινον ἐν βραχεῖ θήσω μέγαν:Of Tydeus next the lofty praise I will express in brief; no brilliant spokesman he, but a clever craftsman in the art of war, with many a shrewd Valckenaer σοφός for MS. σοφά . Porson condemns the line. device; inferior in judgment to his brother Meleager


οὐκ ἐν λόγοις ἦν λαμπρός, ἀλλ' ἐν ἀσπίδιOf Tydeus next the lofty praise I will express in brief; no brilliant spokesman he, but a clever craftsman in the art of war, with many a shrewd Valckenaer σοφός for MS. σοφά . Porson condemns the line. device; inferior in judgment to his brother Meleager


δεινὸς σοφιστής, πολλά τ' ἐξευρεῖν σοφά.Of Tydeus next the lofty praise I will express in brief; no brilliant spokesman he, but a clever craftsman in the art of war, with many a shrewd Valckenaer σοφός for MS. σοφά . Porson condemns the line. device; inferior in judgment to his brother Meleager


γνώμῃ δ' ἀδελφοῦ Μελεάγρου λελειμμένοςOf Tydeus next the lofty praise I will express in brief; no brilliant spokesman he, but a clever craftsman in the art of war, with many a shrewd Valckenaer σοφός for MS. σοφά . Porson condemns the line. device; inferior in judgment to his brother Meleager


ἴσον παρέσχεν ὄνομα διὰ τέχνης δορόςyet through his warrior skill lending his name to equal praise, for he had found in arms a perfect science; his was an ambitious nature, a spirit rich in store of deeds, with words less fully dowered. From this account then wonder not


εὑρὼν ἀκριβῆ μουσικὴν ἐν ἀσπίδι:yet through his warrior skill lending his name to equal praise, for he had found in arms a perfect science; his was an ambitious nature, a spirit rich in store of deeds, with words less fully dowered. From this account then wonder not


φιλότιμον ἦθος πλούσιον, φρόνημα δὲyet through his warrior skill lending his name to equal praise, for he had found in arms a perfect science; his was an ambitious nature, a spirit rich in store of deeds, with words less fully dowered. From this account then wonder not


ἐν τοῖσιν ἔργοις, οὐχὶ τοῖς λόγοις, ἴσον.yet through his warrior skill lending his name to equal praise, for he had found in arms a perfect science; his was an ambitious nature, a spirit rich in store of deeds, with words less fully dowered. From this account then wonder not


ἐκ τῶνδε μὴ θαύμαζε τῶν εἰρημένωνyet through his warrior skill lending his name to equal praise, for he had found in arms a perfect science; his was an ambitious nature, a spirit rich in store of deeds, with words less fully dowered. From this account then wonder not


Θησεῦ, πρὸ πύργων τούσδε τολμῆσαι θανεῖν.Theseus, that they dared to die before the towers; for noble nurture carries honour with it, and every man, when once he hath practised virtue, scorns the name of villain. Courage may be learnt, for even a babe doth learn


τὸ γὰρ τραφῆναι μὴ κακῶς αἰδῶ φέρει:Theseus, that they dared to die before the towers; for noble nurture carries honour with it, and every man, when once he hath practised virtue, scorns the name of villain. Courage may be learnt, for even a babe doth learn


αἰσχύνεται δὲ τἀγάθ' ἀσκήσας ἀνὴρTheseus, that they dared to die before the towers; for noble nurture carries honour with it, and every man, when once he hath practised virtue, scorns the name of villain. Courage may be learnt, for even a babe doth learn


κακὸς γενέσθαι πᾶς τις. ἡ δ' εὐανδρίαTheseus, that they dared to die before the towers; for noble nurture carries honour with it, and every man, when once he hath practised virtue, scorns the name of villain. Courage may be learnt, for even a babe doth learn


διδακτός, εἴπερ καὶ βρέφος διδάσκεταιTheseus, that they dared to die before the towers; for noble nurture carries honour with it, and every man, when once he hath practised virtue, scorns the name of villain. Courage may be learnt, for even a babe doth learn


λέγειν ἀκούειν θ' ὧν μάθησιν οὐκ ἔχει.to speak and hear things it cannot comprehend; and whatso’er a child Reading παῖς with Valckenaer. hath learnt, this it is his wont to treasure up till he is old. So train up your children in a virtuous way. Choru


ἃ δ' ἂν μάθῃ τις, ταῦτα σῴζεσθαι φιλεῖto speak and hear things it cannot comprehend; and whatso’er a child Reading παῖς with Valckenaer. hath learnt, this it is his wont to treasure up till he is old. So train up your children in a virtuous way. Choru


πρὸς γῆρας. οὕτω παῖδας εὖ παιδεύετε.to speak and hear things it cannot comprehend; and whatso’er a child Reading παῖς with Valckenaer. hath learnt, this it is his wont to treasure up till he is old. So train up your children in a virtuous way. Choru


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6.17 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Euripides, Alcestis, 426-429, 611-612, 614-635, 743-744, 862-863, 866-867, 869-871, 897-902, 911, 916-919, 922, 926-928, 425 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

425. Ho! sirrahs, catch me this woman; hold her fast; for ’tis no welcome story she will have to hear. It was to make thee leave the holy altar of the goddess that I held thy child’s death before thy eyes, and so induced thee to give thyself up to me to die.
3. Euripides, Andromache, 1117-1172, 1176, 1187, 1211, 1218, 1226-1242, 1263-1270, 1116 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1116. εἷς ἦν ἁπάντων τῶνδε μηχανορράφος.
4. Euripides, Bacchae, 1217-1226, 1285, 1300-1329, 1216 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1216. ἕπεσθέ μοι φέροντες ἄθλιον βάρος 1216. Follow me, carrying the miserable burden of Pentheus, follow me, slaves, before the house; exhausted from countless searches, I am bringing his body, for I discovered it in the folds of Kithairon
5. Euripides, Electra, 1277-1280, 1276 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1276. σοὶ μὲν τάδ' εἶπον: τόνδε δ' Αἰγίσθου νέκυν
6. Euripides, Hecuba, 1288, 25-50, 610, 616, 675, 678-680, 684-732, 894-897, 1287 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1287. ̔Εκάβη, σὺ δ', ὦ τάλαινα, διπτύχους νεκροὺς
7. Euripides, Helen, 1243, 1260, 1291-1300, 1390-1395, 1400, 1408, 1419, 1528, 1542-1604, 1240 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1240. τί δ'; ἔστ' ἀπόντων τύμβος; ἢ θάψεις σκιάν; 1240. What? Is there a tomb for the absent? Or will you bury a shadow? Helen
8. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 1027-1045, 1159-1162, 1026 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1026. rend= Bury my body after death in its destined grave in front of the shrine of the virgin goddess Pallas. at Pallene. And I will be thy friend and guardian of thy city for ever, where I lie buried in a foreign soil, but a bitter foe to these children’s descendants, whensoe’er Referring to invasions by the Peloponnesians, descendants of the Heracleidae. with gathered host they come against this land, traitors to your kindness now; such are the strangers ye have championed. Why then came I hither, if I knew all this, instead of regarding the god’s oracle? Because I thought, that Hera was mightier far than any oracle, and would not betray me. Waste no drink-offering on my tomb, nor spill the victim’s blood; for I will requite them for my treatment here with a journey they shall rue; and ye shall have double gain from me, for I will help you and harm them by my death. Alcmena 1026. Slay me, I do not ask thee for mercy; yet since this city let me go and shrunk from slaying me, I will reward it with an old oracle of Loxias, which in time will benefit them more than doth appear.
9. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1359-1366, 1358 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Medea, 1378-1383, 1377 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1377. Give up to me those dead, to bury and lament Medea
11. Euripides, Orestes, 1431-1436, 97-99, 114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1486-1529, 1485 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1485. I do not veil my tender cheek shaded with curls, nor do I feel shame, from maiden modesty, at the dark red beneath my eyes, the blush upon my face, as I hurry on, in bacchic revelry for the dead
13. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 287-364, 399-462, 526-527, 671-672, 754-759, 778-836, 841-843, 846-856, 858-931, 934-935, 950-989, 286 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

286. Mother mine, why weepest thou, drawing o’er thine eyes thy veil? Is it because thou didst hear their piteous lamentations? To my own heart it goes. Raise thy silvered head, weep not
14. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1134-1146, 1156-1206, 1240-1245, 1248-1250, 735-739, 1133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 4.92-4.99 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aethra Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
aetiology Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
aristotle, poetics Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 786
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 194, 786, 834
calame, c. xviii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 786
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
chorus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 786
collard, c. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 194
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
dramatic festivals, discursive parameters Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
euripides suppliant women, dating Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
euripides suppliant women, interpretation Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
funerals Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 786
impiety Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
iphigenia in tauris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
kommos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 194
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
morwood, j. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 194
mêchanê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
nomos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
plutarch Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 194
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 194, 786, 834
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
weddings' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
zeus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 786