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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5640
Euripides, Suppliant Women, 498-499


ὃς προσβαλὼν πύλῃσιν ὤμοσεν πόλινtrying to rescue and bury those whom their own acts of insolence haye ruined. Verily then it would seem Capaneus was unjustly blasted by the thunderbolt and charred upon the ladder he had raised against our gates, swearing he would sack our town, whether the god would or no;


πέρσειν θεοῦ θέλοντος ἤν τε μὴ θέλῃ;trying to rescue and bury those whom their own acts of insolence haye ruined. Verily then it would seem Capaneus was unjustly blasted by the thunderbolt and charred upon the ladder he had raised against our gates, swearing he would sack our town, whether the god would or no;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.494, 2.557, 21.441-21.457 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.494. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.557. /Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls 21.441. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.442. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.443. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.444. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.445. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.446. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.447. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.448. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.449. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.450. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.451. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.452. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.453. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.454. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.455. /Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.456. /Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.457. /Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably
2. Homer, Odyssey, 12.348-12.351, 12.445-12.446 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 530-532, 609-614, 529 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

529. ὄμνυσι δʼ αἰχμὴν ἣν ἔχει μᾶλλον θεοῦ
4. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 912-953, 911 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

911. οὗτος, τί ποιεῖς; ἐκ ποίου φρονήματος 911. You there! What are you doing? What kind of arrogance has incited you to do such dishonor to this realm of Pelasgian men? Indeed, do you think you have come to a land of women? For a barbarian dealing with Hellenes, you act insolently.
5. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 629-664, 628 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

628. ἐξ οὗ γε χοροῖσιν ἐφέστηκεν τρυγικοῖς ὁ διδάσκαλος ἡμῶν
6. Aristophanes, Knights, 506-550, 505 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

505. ὦ παντοίας ἤδη Μούσης
7. Aristophanes, Frogs, 676-705, 710, 718-733, 675 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

675. Μοῦσα χορῶν ἱερῶν: ἐπίβηθι καὶ ἔλθ' ἐπὶ τέρψιν ἀοιδᾶς ἐμᾶς
8. Euripides, Bacchae, 266-329, 265 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

265. Ἐχίονος δʼ ὢν παῖς καταισχύνεις γένος; Τειρεσίας 265. Do you, the child of Echion, bring shame to your race? Teiresia
9. Euripides, Electra, 1025-1029, 1032, 1035, 1024 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 102-115, 118-119, 121, 123-129, 133-283, 341, 57-58, 61-79, 94, 101 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

101. εἰκὸς θεῶν ἱκτῆρας αἰδεῖσθαι, ξένε 101. rend= Copreus 101. Stranger, ’tis but right we should reverence the gods’ suppliants, suffering none with violent hand to make them Reading σφε (Musgrave) for MS. σε . Schmidt, τάδ’ ἀλιτεῖν σ’ ἕδη thee (i.e. Copreus) to transgress against. leave the altars, for that will dread Justice ne’er permit. Copreu
11. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 141-164, 217-229, 236-237, 240-246, 266-267, 140 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Hippolytus, 58 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

58. Come follow, friends, singing to Artemis, daughter of Zeus, throned in the sky
13. Euripides, Ion, 465, 464 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 144-145, 160-167, 214-266, 271-276, 282-303, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 481-495, 626-630, 433 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 19, 301-302, 304-312, 381-497, 499-597, 739-741, 825-827, 859, 867-868, 870, 935, 187 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Herodotus, Histories, 7.139 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.139. Here I am forced to declare an opinion which will be displeasing to most, but I will not refrain from saying what seems to me to be true. ,Had the Athenians been panic-struck by the threatened peril and left their own country, or had they not indeed left it but remained and surrendered themselves to Xerxes, none would have attempted to withstand the king by sea. What would have happened on land if no one had resisted the king by sea is easy enough to determine. ,Although the Peloponnesians had built not one but many walls across the Isthmus for their defense, they would nevertheless have been deserted by their allies (these having no choice or free will in the matter, but seeing their cities taken one by one by the foreign fleet), until at last they would have stood alone. They would then have put up quite a fight and perished nobly. ,Such would have been their fate. Perhaps, however, when they saw the rest of Hellas siding with the enemy, they would have made terms with Xerxes. In either case Hellas would have been subdued by the Persians, for I cannot see what advantage could accrue from the walls built across the isthmus, while the king was master of the seas. ,As it is, to say that the Athenians were the saviors of Hellas is to hit the truth. It was the Athenians who held the balance; whichever side they joined was sure to prevail. choosing that Greece should preserve her freedom, the Athenians roused to battle the other Greek states which had not yet gone over to the Persians and, after the gods, were responsible for driving the king off. ,Nor were they moved to desert Hellas by the threatening oracles which came from Delphi and sorely dismayed them, but they stood firm and had the courage to meet the invader of their country.
18. Isocrates, Orations, 4.93, 4.95-4.99 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19. Lysias, Orations, 2.33-2.45 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

20. Sophocles, Antigone, 67, 66 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 781-782, 399 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

399. Yes, be great Zeus my witness—in anything that I know. Deianeira:
22. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.42, 1.73.2-1.73.74, 2.20-2.23, 2.37-2.41, 2.52-2.53, 2.57-2.65, 2.67-2.68, 2.71-2.77, 3.37-3.48, 4.77, 4.89-4.101 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.73.2. We need not refer to remote antiquity: there we could appeal to the voice of tradition, but not to the experience of our audience. But to the Median war and contemporary history we must refer, although we are rather tired of continually bringing this subject forward. In our action during that war we ran great risk to obtain certain advantages: you had your share in the solid results, do not try to rob us of all share in the good that the glory may do us. 1.73.3. However, the story shall be told not so much to deprecate hostility as to testify against it, and to show, if you are so ill-advised as to enter into a struggle with Athens, what sort of an antagonist she is likely to prove. 1.73.4. We assert that at Marathon we were at the front, and faced the barbarian single-handed. That when he came the second time, unable to cope with him by land we went on board our ships with all our people, and joined in the action at Salamis . This prevented his taking the Peloponnesian states in detail, and ravaging them with his fleet; when the multitude of his vessels would have made any combination for self-defence impossible. 1.73.5. The best proof of this was furnished by the invader himself. Defeated at sea, he considered his power to be no longer what it had been, and retired as speedily as possible with the greater part of his army.
23. Aristotle, Rhetoric, 1.15 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

24. Strabo, Geography, 9.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.1.10. At the present time the island is held by the Athenians, although in early times there was strife between them and the Megarians for its possession. Some say that it was Peisistratus, others Solon, who inserted in the Catalogue of Ships immediately after the verse, and Aias brought twelve ships from Salamis, the verse, and, bringing them, halted them where the battalions of the Athenians were stationed, and then used the poet as a witness that the island had belonged to the Athenians from the beginning. But the critics do not accept this interpretation, because many of the verses bear witness to the contrary. For why is Aias found in the last place in the ship-camp, not with the Athenians, but with the Thessalians under Protesilaus? Here were the ships of Aias and Protesilaus. And in the Visitation of the troops, Agamemnon found Menestheus the charioteer, son of Peteos, standing still; and about him were the Athenians, masters of the battle-cry. And near by stood Odysseus of many wiles, and about him, at his side, the ranks of the Cephallenians. And back again to Aias and the Salaminians, he came to the Aiantes, and near them, Idomeneus on the other side, not Menestheus. The Athenians, then, are reputed to have cited alleged testimony of this kind from Homer, and the Megarians to have replied with the following parody: Aias brought ships from Salamis, from Polichne, from Aegeirussa, from Nisaea, and from Tripodes; these four are Megarian places, and, of these, Tripodes is called Tripodiscium, near which the present marketplace of the Megarians is situated.
25. Vergil, Georgics, 1.501-1.502 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.501. Appear the stars' keen edges, nor the moon 1.502. As borrowing of her brother's beams to rise
26. Plutarch, Solon, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.35.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.35.3. There are still the remains of a market-place, a temple of Ajax and his statue in ebony. Even at the present day the Athenians pay honors to Ajax himself and to Eurysaces, for there is an altar of Eurysaces also at Athens . In Salamis is shown a stone not far from the harbor, on which they say that Telamon sat when he gazed at the ship in which his children were sailing away to Aulis to take part in the joint expedition of the Greeks.
28. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.48 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.48. And lest it should be thought that he had acquired Salamis by force only and not of right, he opened certain graves and showed that the dead were buried with their faces to the east, as was the custom of burial among the Athenians; further, that the tombs themselves faced the east, and that the inscriptions graven upon them named the deceased by their demes, which is a style peculiar to Athens. Some authors assert that in Homer's catalogue of the ships after the line:Ajax twelve ships from Salamis commands,Solon inserted one of his own:And fixed their station next the Athenian bands.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adrastus, hybris of Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 198
aeschylus, on theseus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
aethra Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 198, 199
agon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188, 587
aiantis tribe, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
alcibiades Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188
alexandros Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
alope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
antiope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
archeology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
argos, and athens Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
aristophanes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
athens, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
athens, and identity Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
athens, council of Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 151
athens Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
athens and athenians, in persian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
cadmus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
capaneus (suppliant women) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 298, 307
chians Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 151
chloe Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 151
chorus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
creon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
danaus, daughters of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
death, oration for argive corpses, in suppliant women Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 133
deception, opposed to hoplitism Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
delphi Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
democracy, athenian, thucydides depiction of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
democracy, in athens Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
egyptus, sons of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
eteocles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
eteocles (phoenician women) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 307
euripides, on theseus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
euripides, supplices Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
euripides Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
exarchos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
general theseus, mythic image of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
helping paradigm (international relations), and justice Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 199
heraclea, athena of Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 151
heracleans Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 151
heracles Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 298
heralds Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 151
herodotus, and the athenian audience Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
herodotus, historical perspective of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
hesione (daughter of laomedon) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 298
irony' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 133
laomedon (king of troy) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 298
law, nomos on burial Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 198, 199
lichas (trachiniae) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 307
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
men of eleusis, the (aeschylus) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
morwood, j. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188
myths, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
naples, bilingualism in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
nicias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188
nymphs Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 151
odysseus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 298
oedipus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
oracles, delphic Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
oracles, interpreted by athenians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
pactyes Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 151
parthenopaeus (seven against thebes) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 307
payment Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 151
pelasgus, as a democratic king Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
peloponnese Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
peloponnesian war Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
pericles, on deceit Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
pericles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
perjury, punishments for, crop destruction or failure Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 298
persia and persians, war with greeks Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
philia (friendship) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 307
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
plato Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
polyneices Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 307
polynices Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
poseidon, curse of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 298
prexaspes Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 307
priam Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
sea-monsters Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 298
siluae, imperialism in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
smerdis (son of cyrus) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 307
socrates Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
sparta, agoge Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
sparta, education system Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
sparta, krupteia Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
statius, and euripides Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
statius, and greek tragedy Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
statius, father of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
suppliant women, the (aeschylus) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188, 587
suppliant women oration for argive corpses Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 133
suppliants, the (euripides) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
thebes, and athens Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
thebes, thebans, hybris of Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 198, 199
thebes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
theramenes Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 151
theseus, and hippolytus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 298
theseus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
thucydides, and herodotus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
thucydides, funeral speech Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
thucydides, on persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
thucydides, on spartans Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
weasels Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 307
xenophon, and spartan custom Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
xerxes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
zeus, oaths invoking, lightning bolt of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 298
zeus capaneus in suppliant women challenging Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 133
zeus lightning bolt of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 133