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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5640
Euripides, Suppliant Women, 453-597


τερπνὰς τυράννοις ἡδονάς, ὅταν θέλῃWhat boots it to acquire wealth and livelihood for children, merely Kirchhoff rejects this line. to add to the tyrant’s substance by one’s toil? Why train up virgin daughters virtuously in our homes to gratify a tyrant’s whim, whenso he will, and cause tears to those who rear them? May my life end


δάκρυα δ' ἑτοιμάζουσι; μὴ ζῴην ἔτιWhat boots it to acquire wealth and livelihood for children, merely Kirchhoff rejects this line. to add to the tyrant’s substance by one’s toil? Why train up virgin daughters virtuously in our homes to gratify a tyrant’s whim, whenso he will, and cause tears to those who rear them? May my life end


εἰ τἀμὰ τέκνα πρὸς βίαν νυμφεύσεται.if ever my children are to be wedded by violence! This bolt I launch in answer to thy words. Now say, why art thou come? what needest thou of this land? Had not thy city sent thee, to thy cost hadst thou come with thy outrageous utterances; for it is the herald’s duty


καὶ ταῦτα μὲν δὴ πρὸς τὰ σὰ ἐξηκόντισα.if ever my children are to be wedded by violence! This bolt I launch in answer to thy words. Now say, why art thou come? what needest thou of this land? Had not thy city sent thee, to thy cost hadst thou come with thy outrageous utterances; for it is the herald’s duty


ἥκεις δὲ δὴ τί τῆσδε γῆς κεχρημένος;if ever my children are to be wedded by violence! This bolt I launch in answer to thy words. Now say, why art thou come? what needest thou of this land? Had not thy city sent thee, to thy cost hadst thou come with thy outrageous utterances; for it is the herald’s duty


κλαίων γ' ἂν ἦλθες, εἴ σε μὴ '†πεμψεν πόλιςif ever my children are to be wedded by violence! This bolt I launch in answer to thy words. Now say, why art thou come? what needest thou of this land? Had not thy city sent thee, to thy cost hadst thou come with thy outrageous utterances; for it is the herald’s duty


περισσὰ φωνῶν: τὸν γὰρ ἄγγελον χρεὼνif ever my children are to be wedded by violence! This bolt I launch in answer to thy words. Now say, why art thou come? what needest thou of this land? Had not thy city sent thee, to thy cost hadst thou come with thy outrageous utterances; for it is the herald’s duty


λέξανθ' ὅς' ἂν τάξῃ τις ὡς τάχος πάλινto tell the message he is bidden and hie him back in haste. Henceforth forth let Creon send to my city some other messenger less talkative than thee. Choru


χωρεῖν. τὸ λοιπὸν δ' εἰς ἐμὴν πόλιν Κρέωνto tell the message he is bidden and hie him back in haste. Henceforth forth let Creon send to my city some other messenger less talkative than thee. Choru


ἧσσον λάλον σου πεμπέτω τιν' ἄγγελον.to tell the message he is bidden and hie him back in haste. Henceforth forth let Creon send to my city some other messenger less talkative than thee. Choru


φεῦ φεῦ: κακοῖσιν ὡς ὅταν δαίμων διδῷLook you! how insolent the villains are, when Fortune is kind to them, just as if it would be well with them for ever. Herald


καλῶς, ὑβρίζους' ὡς ἀεὶ πράξοντες εὖ.Look you! how insolent the villains are, when Fortune is kind to them, just as if it would be well with them for ever. Herald


λέγοιμ' ἂν ἤδη. τῶν μὲν ἠγωνισμένωνNow will I speak. On these disputed points hold thou this view, but I the contrary.


σοὶ μὲν δοκείτω ταῦτ', ἐμοὶ δὲ τἀντία.Now will I speak. On these disputed points hold thou this view, but I the contrary.


ἐγὼ δ' ἀπαυδῶ πᾶς τε Καδμεῖος λεὼςSo I and all the people of Cadmus forbid thee to admit Adrastus to this land, but if he is here


̓́Αδραστον ἐς γῆν τήνδε μὴ παριέναι:So I and all the people of Cadmus forbid thee to admit Adrastus to this land, but if he is here


εἰ δ' ἔστιν ἐν γῇ, πρὶν θεοῦ δῦναι σέλαςSo I and all the people of Cadmus forbid thee to admit Adrastus to this land, but if he is here


λύσαντα σεμνὰ στεμμάτων μυστήριαdrive him forth in disregard of the holy suppliant Reading ἰκτήρια with Nauck. bough he bears, ere sinks yon blazing sun, and attempt not violently to take up the dead, seeing thou hast naught to do with the city of Argos. And if thou wilt hearken to me, thou shalt bring thy barque of state into port unharmed by the billows; but if not, fierce shall the surge of battle be


τῆσδ' ἐξελαύνειν, μηδ' ἀναιρεῖσθαι νεκροὺςdrive him forth in disregard of the holy suppliant Reading ἰκτήρια with Nauck. bough he bears, ere sinks yon blazing sun, and attempt not violently to take up the dead, seeing thou hast naught to do with the city of Argos. And if thou wilt hearken to me, thou shalt bring thy barque of state into port unharmed by the billows; but if not, fierce shall the surge of battle be


βίᾳ, προσήκοντ' οὐδὲν ̓Αργείων πόλει.drive him forth in disregard of the holy suppliant Reading ἰκτήρια with Nauck. bough he bears, ere sinks yon blazing sun, and attempt not violently to take up the dead, seeing thou hast naught to do with the city of Argos. And if thou wilt hearken to me, thou shalt bring thy barque of state into port unharmed by the billows; but if not, fierce shall the surge of battle be


κἂν μὲν πίθῃ μοι, κυμάτων ἄτερ πόλινdrive him forth in disregard of the holy suppliant Reading ἰκτήρια with Nauck. bough he bears, ere sinks yon blazing sun, and attempt not violently to take up the dead, seeing thou hast naught to do with the city of Argos. And if thou wilt hearken to me, thou shalt bring thy barque of state into port unharmed by the billows; but if not, fierce shall the surge of battle be


σὴν ναυστολήσεις: εἰ δὲ μή, πολὺς κλύδωνdrive him forth in disregard of the holy suppliant Reading ἰκτήρια with Nauck. bough he bears, ere sinks yon blazing sun, and attempt not violently to take up the dead, seeing thou hast naught to do with the city of Argos. And if thou wilt hearken to me, thou shalt bring thy barque of state into port unharmed by the billows; but if not, fierce shall the surge of battle be


ἡμῖν τε καὶ σοὶ συμμάχοις τ' ἔσται δορός.that we and our allies shall raise. Take good thought, nor, angered at my words, because forsooth thou rulest thy city with freedom, return a vaunting answer from Hartung’s emendation of this doubtful expression is ’εν βραχεῖ λόγῳ . thy feebler means. Hope is man’s curse; many a state hath it involved


σκέψαι δέ, καὶ μὴ τοῖς ἐμοῖς θυμούμενοςthat we and our allies shall raise. Take good thought, nor, angered at my words, because forsooth thou rulest thy city with freedom, return a vaunting answer from Hartung’s emendation of this doubtful expression is ’εν βραχεῖ λόγῳ . thy feebler means. Hope is man’s curse; many a state hath it involved


λόγοισιν, ὡς δὴ πόλιν ἐλευθέραν ἔχωνthat we and our allies shall raise. Take good thought, nor, angered at my words, because forsooth thou rulest thy city with freedom, return a vaunting answer from Hartung’s emendation of this doubtful expression is ’εν βραχεῖ λόγῳ . thy feebler means. Hope is man’s curse; many a state hath it involved


σφριγῶντ' ἀμείψῃ μῦθον ἐκ βραχιόνων:that we and our allies shall raise. Take good thought, nor, angered at my words, because forsooth thou rulest thy city with freedom, return a vaunting answer from Hartung’s emendation of this doubtful expression is ’εν βραχεῖ λόγῳ . thy feebler means. Hope is man’s curse; many a state hath it involved


ἐλπὶς γάρ ἐστ' ἄπιστον, ἣ πολλὰς πόλειςthat we and our allies shall raise. Take good thought, nor, angered at my words, because forsooth thou rulest thy city with freedom, return a vaunting answer from Hartung’s emendation of this doubtful expression is ’εν βραχεῖ λόγῳ . thy feebler means. Hope is man’s curse; many a state hath it involved


συνῆψ', ἄγουσα θυμὸν εἰς ὑπερβολάς.in strife, by leading them into excessive rage. For whenso the city has to vote on the question of war, no man ever takes his own death into account, but shifts this misfortune on to his neighbour; but if death had been before their eyes when they were giving their votes


ὅταν γὰρ ἔλθῃ πόλεμος ἐς ψῆφον λεώin strife, by leading them into excessive rage. For whenso the city has to vote on the question of war, no man ever takes his own death into account, but shifts this misfortune on to his neighbour; but if death had been before their eyes when they were giving their votes


οὐδεὶς ἔθ' αὑτοῦ θάνατον ἐκλογίζεταιin strife, by leading them into excessive rage. For whenso the city has to vote on the question of war, no man ever takes his own death into account, but shifts this misfortune on to his neighbour; but if death had been before their eyes when they were giving their votes


τὸ δυστυχὲς δὲ τοῦτ' ἐς ἄλλον ἐκτρέπει:in strife, by leading them into excessive rage. For whenso the city has to vote on the question of war, no man ever takes his own death into account, but shifts this misfortune on to his neighbour; but if death had been before their eyes when they were giving their votes


εἰ δ' ἦν παρ' ὄμμα θάνατος ἐν ψήφου φορᾷin strife, by leading them into excessive rage. For whenso the city has to vote on the question of war, no man ever takes his own death into account, but shifts this misfortune on to his neighbour; but if death had been before their eyes when they were giving their votes


οὐκ ἄν ποθ' ̔Ελλὰς δοριμανὴς ἀπώλλυτο.Hellas would ne’er have rushed to her doom in mad desire for battle. And yet each man amongst us knows which of the two to prefer, the good or ill, and how much better peace is for mankind than war,—peace, the Muses’ chiefest friend


καίτοι δυοῖν γε πάντες ἄνθρωποι λόγοινHellas would ne’er have rushed to her doom in mad desire for battle. And yet each man amongst us knows which of the two to prefer, the good or ill, and how much better peace is for mankind than war,—peace, the Muses’ chiefest friend


τὸν κρείσσον' ἴσμεν, καὶ τὰ χρηστὰ καὶ κακάHellas would ne’er have rushed to her doom in mad desire for battle. And yet each man amongst us knows which of the two to prefer, the good or ill, and how much better peace is for mankind than war,—peace, the Muses’ chiefest friend


ὅσῳ τε πολέμου κρεῖσσον εἰρήνη βροτοῖς:Hellas would ne’er have rushed to her doom in mad desire for battle. And yet each man amongst us knows which of the two to prefer, the good or ill, and how much better peace is for mankind than war,—peace, the Muses’ chiefest friend


ἣ πρῶτα μὲν Μούσαισι προσφιλεστάτηHellas would ne’er have rushed to her doom in mad desire for battle. And yet each man amongst us knows which of the two to prefer, the good or ill, and how much better peace is for mankind than war,—peace, the Muses’ chiefest friend


Ποιναῖσι δ' ἐχθρά, τέρπεται δ' εὐπαιδίᾳthe foe of sorrow, whose joy is in glad throngs of children, and its delight in prosperity. These are the blessings we cast away and wickedly embark on war, man enslaving his weaker brother, and cities following suit.


χαίρει δὲ πλούτῳ. ταῦτ' ἀφέντες οἱ κακοὶthe foe of sorrow, whose joy is in glad throngs of children, and its delight in prosperity. These are the blessings we cast away and wickedly embark on war, man enslaving his weaker brother, and cities following suit.


πολέμους ἀναιρούμεσθα καὶ τὸν ἥσσοναthe foe of sorrow, whose joy is in glad throngs of children, and its delight in prosperity. These are the blessings we cast away and wickedly embark on war, man enslaving his weaker brother, and cities following suit.


δουλούμεθ', ἄνδρες ἄνδρα καὶ πόλις πόλιν.the foe of sorrow, whose joy is in glad throngs of children, and its delight in prosperity. These are the blessings we cast away and wickedly embark on war, man enslaving his weaker brother, and cities following suit.


σὺ δ' ἄνδρας ἐχθροὺς καὶ θανόντας ὠφελεῖςNow thou art helping our foes even after death


θάπτων κομίζων θ' ὕβρις οὓς ἀπώλεσεν;trying to rescue and bury those whom their own acts of insolence haye ruined. Verily then it would seem Capaneus was unjustly blasted by the thunderbolt and charred upon the ladder he had raised against our gates, swearing he would sack our town, whether the god would or no;


οὔ τἄρ' ἔτ' ὀρθῶς Καπανέως κεραύνιονtrying to rescue and bury those whom their own acts of insolence haye ruined. Verily then it would seem Capaneus was unjustly blasted by the thunderbolt and charred upon the ladder he had raised against our gates, swearing he would sack our town, whether the god would or no;


δέμας καπνοῦται, κλιμάκων ὀρθοστάταςtrying to rescue and bury those whom their own acts of insolence haye ruined. Verily then it would seem Capaneus was unjustly blasted by the thunderbolt and charred upon the ladder he had raised against our gates, swearing he would sack our town, whether the god would or no;


ὃς προσβαλὼν πύλῃσιν ὤμοσεν πόλινtrying to rescue and bury those whom their own acts of insolence haye ruined. Verily then it would seem Capaneus was unjustly blasted by the thunderbolt and charred upon the ladder he had raised against our gates, swearing he would sack our town, whether the god would or no;


πέρσειν θεοῦ θέλοντος ἤν τε μὴ θέλῃ;trying to rescue and bury those whom their own acts of insolence haye ruined. Verily then it would seem Capaneus was unjustly blasted by the thunderbolt and charred upon the ladder he had raised against our gates, swearing he would sack our town, whether the god would or no;


οὐδ' ἥρπασεν χάρυβδις οἰωνοσκόπονnor should the yawning earth have snatched away the seer, i.e. Amphiaraus, who disappeared in a chasm of the earth. opening wide her mouth to take his chariot and its horses in, nor should the other chieftains be stretched at our gates, their skeletons to atoms crushed ’neath boulders. Either boast thy wit transcendeth that of Zeus


τέθριππον ἅρμα περιβαλοῦσα χάσματιnor should the yawning earth have snatched away the seer, i.e. Amphiaraus, who disappeared in a chasm of the earth. opening wide her mouth to take his chariot and its horses in, nor should the other chieftains be stretched at our gates, their skeletons to atoms crushed ’neath boulders. Either boast thy wit transcendeth that of Zeus


ἄλλοι τε κεῖνται πρὸς πύλαις λοχαγέταιnor should the yawning earth have snatched away the seer, i.e. Amphiaraus, who disappeared in a chasm of the earth. opening wide her mouth to take his chariot and its horses in, nor should the other chieftains be stretched at our gates, their skeletons to atoms crushed ’neath boulders. Either boast thy wit transcendeth that of Zeus


πέτροις καταξανθέντες ὀστέων ῥαφάς;nor should the yawning earth have snatched away the seer, i.e. Amphiaraus, who disappeared in a chasm of the earth. opening wide her mouth to take his chariot and its horses in, nor should the other chieftains be stretched at our gates, their skeletons to atoms crushed ’neath boulders. Either boast thy wit transcendeth that of Zeus


ἤ νυν φρονεῖν ἄμεινον ἐξαύχει Διόςnor should the yawning earth have snatched away the seer, i.e. Amphiaraus, who disappeared in a chasm of the earth. opening wide her mouth to take his chariot and its horses in, nor should the other chieftains be stretched at our gates, their skeletons to atoms crushed ’neath boulders. Either boast thy wit transcendeth that of Zeus


ἢ θεοὺς δικαίως τοὺς κακοὺς ἀπολλύναι.or else allow that gods are right to slay the ungodly. The wise should love their children first, next their parents and country, whose fortunes it behoves them to increase rather than break down. Rashness in a leader, as in a pilot, causeth shipwreck; who knoweth when to be quiet is a wise man.


φιλεῖν μὲν οὖν χρὴ τοὺς σοφοὺς πρῶτον τέκναor else allow that gods are right to slay the ungodly. The wise should love their children first, next their parents and country, whose fortunes it behoves them to increase rather than break down. Rashness in a leader, as in a pilot, causeth shipwreck; who knoweth when to be quiet is a wise man.


ἔπειτα τοκέας πατρίδα θ', ἣν αὔξειν χρεὼνor else allow that gods are right to slay the ungodly. The wise should love their children first, next their parents and country, whose fortunes it behoves them to increase rather than break down. Rashness in a leader, as in a pilot, causeth shipwreck; who knoweth when to be quiet is a wise man.


καὶ μὴ κατᾶξαι. σφαλερὸν ἡγεμὼν θρασύς:or else allow that gods are right to slay the ungodly. The wise should love their children first, next their parents and country, whose fortunes it behoves them to increase rather than break down. Rashness in a leader, as in a pilot, causeth shipwreck; who knoweth when to be quiet is a wise man.


νεώς τε ναύτης ἥσυχος, καιρῷ σοφός.or else allow that gods are right to slay the ungodly. The wise should love their children first, next their parents and country, whose fortunes it behoves them to increase rather than break down. Rashness in a leader, as in a pilot, causeth shipwreck; who knoweth when to be quiet is a wise man.


καὶ τοῦτ' ἐμοὶ τἀνδρεῖον, ἡ προμηθία.Yea and this too is bravery, even forethought. Choru


ἐξαρκέσας ἦν Ζεὺς ὁ τιμωρούμενοςYea and this too is bravery, even forethought. Choru


ὑμᾶς δ' ὑβρίζειν οὐκ ἐχρῆν τοιάνδ' ὕβριν.Yea and this too is bravery, even forethought. Choru


ὦ παγκάκιστε — σῖγ', ̓́Αδραστ', ἔχε στόμαThe punishment Zeus hath inflicted was surely enough; there was no need to heap this wanton insult on us. Adrastu


καὶ μὴ 'πίπροσθεν τῶν ἐμῶν τοὺς σοὺς λόγουςPeace, Adrastus! say no more; set not thy words before mine


θῇς: οὐ γὰρ ἥκει πρὸς σὲ κηρύσσων ὅδεfor ’tis not to thee this fellow is come with his message, but to me, and I must answer him. Thy first assertion will I answer first: I am not aware that Creon is my lord and master, or that his power outweigheth mine, that so he should compel


ἀλλ' ὡς ἔμ': ἡμᾶς κἀποκρίνασθαι χρεών.for ’tis not to thee this fellow is come with his message, but to me, and I must answer him. Thy first assertion will I answer first: I am not aware that Creon is my lord and master, or that his power outweigheth mine, that so he should compel


καὶ πρῶτα μέν σε πρὸς τὰ πρῶτ' ἀμείψομαι.for ’tis not to thee this fellow is come with his message, but to me, and I must answer him. Thy first assertion will I answer first: I am not aware that Creon is my lord and master, or that his power outweigheth mine, that so he should compel


οὐκ οἶδ' ἐγὼ Κρέοντα δεσπόζοντ' ἐμοῦfor ’tis not to thee this fellow is come with his message, but to me, and I must answer him. Thy first assertion will I answer first: I am not aware that Creon is my lord and master, or that his power outweigheth mine, that so he should compel


οὐδὲ σθένοντα μεῖζον, ὥστ' ἀναγκάσαιfor ’tis not to thee this fellow is come with his message, but to me, and I must answer him. Thy first assertion will I answer first: I am not aware that Creon is my lord and master, or that his power outweigheth mine, that so he should compel


δρᾶν τὰς ̓Αθήνας ταῦτ': ἄνω γὰρ ἂν ῥέοιAthens to act on this wise; nay! for then would the tide of time have to flow backward, if we are to be ordered about, as he thinks. ’Tis not I who choose this war, seeing that I did not even join these warriors to go unto the land of Cadmus; but still I claim to bury the fallen dead, not injuring any state


τὰ πράγμαθ' οὕτως, εἰ 'πιταξόμεσθα δή.Athens to act on this wise; nay! for then would the tide of time have to flow backward, if we are to be ordered about, as he thinks. ’Tis not I who choose this war, seeing that I did not even join these warriors to go unto the land of Cadmus; but still I claim to bury the fallen dead, not injuring any state


πόλεμον δὲ τοῦτον οὐκ ἐγὼ καθίσταμαιAthens to act on this wise; nay! for then would the tide of time have to flow backward, if we are to be ordered about, as he thinks. ’Tis not I who choose this war, seeing that I did not even join these warriors to go unto the land of Cadmus; but still I claim to bury the fallen dead, not injuring any state


ὃς οὐδὲ σὺν τοῖσδ' ἦλθον ἐς Κάδμου χθόνα:Athens to act on this wise; nay! for then would the tide of time have to flow backward, if we are to be ordered about, as he thinks. ’Tis not I who choose this war, seeing that I did not even join these warriors to go unto the land of Cadmus; but still I claim to bury the fallen dead, not injuring any state


νεκροὺς δὲ τοὺς θανόντας, οὐ βλάπτων πόλινAthens to act on this wise; nay! for then would the tide of time have to flow backward, if we are to be ordered about, as he thinks. ’Tis not I who choose this war, seeing that I did not even join these warriors to go unto the land of Cadmus; but still I claim to bury the fallen dead, not injuring any state


οὐδ' ἀνδροκμῆτας προσφέρων ἀγωνίαςnor yet introducing murderous strife, but preserving the law of all Hellas. What is not well in this? If ye suffered aught from the Argives—lo! they are dead; ye took a splendid vengeance on your foe


θάψαι δικαιῶ, τὸν Πανελλήνων νόμονnor yet introducing murderous strife, but preserving the law of all Hellas. What is not well in this? If ye suffered aught from the Argives—lo! they are dead; ye took a splendid vengeance on your foe


σῴζων. τί τούτων ἐστὶν οὐ καλῶς ἔχον;nor yet introducing murderous strife, but preserving the law of all Hellas. What is not well in this? If ye suffered aught from the Argives—lo! they are dead; ye took a splendid vengeance on your foe


εἰ γάρ τι καὶ πεπόνθατ' ̓Αργείων ὕποnor yet introducing murderous strife, but preserving the law of all Hellas. What is not well in this? If ye suffered aught from the Argives—lo! they are dead; ye took a splendid vengeance on your foe


τεθνᾶσιν, ἠμύνασθε πολεμίους καλῶςnor yet introducing murderous strife, but preserving the law of all Hellas. What is not well in this? If ye suffered aught from the Argives—lo! they are dead; ye took a splendid vengeance on your foe


αἰσχρῶς δ' ἐκείνοις, χἡ δίκη διοίχεται.and covered them with shame, and now your right is at an end. Let Nauck regards these lines 531 to 536 as an interpolation. the dead now be buried in the earth, and each element return Restoring ἀπελθεῖν from Stobseus (Hartung). to the place from whence it came to the body, the breath to the air, the body to the ground; for in no wise did we get it


ἐάσατ' ἤδη γῇ καλυφθῆναι νεκρούςand covered them with shame, and now your right is at an end. Let Nauck regards these lines 531 to 536 as an interpolation. the dead now be buried in the earth, and each element return Restoring ἀπελθεῖν from Stobseus (Hartung). to the place from whence it came to the body, the breath to the air, the body to the ground; for in no wise did we get it


ὅθεν δ' ἕκαστον ἐς τὸ φῶς ἀφίκετοand covered them with shame, and now your right is at an end. Let Nauck regards these lines 531 to 536 as an interpolation. the dead now be buried in the earth, and each element return Restoring ἀπελθεῖν from Stobseus (Hartung). to the place from whence it came to the body, the breath to the air, the body to the ground; for in no wise did we get it


ἐνταῦθ' ἀπελθεῖν, πνεῦμα μὲν πρὸς αἰθέραand covered them with shame, and now your right is at an end. Let Nauck regards these lines 531 to 536 as an interpolation. the dead now be buried in the earth, and each element return Restoring ἀπελθεῖν from Stobseus (Hartung). to the place from whence it came to the body, the breath to the air, the body to the ground; for in no wise did we get it


τὸ σῶμα δ' ἐς γῆν: οὔτι γὰρ κεκτήμεθαand covered them with shame, and now your right is at an end. Let Nauck regards these lines 531 to 536 as an interpolation. the dead now be buried in the earth, and each element return Restoring ἀπελθεῖν from Stobseus (Hartung). to the place from whence it came to the body, the breath to the air, the body to the ground; for in no wise did we get it


ἡμέτερον αὐτὸ πλὴν ἐνοικῆσαι βίονfor our own, but to live our life in, and after that its mother earth must take it back again. Dost think ’tis Argos thou art injuring in refusing burial to the dead? Nay! all Hellas shares herein, if a man rob the dead of their due


κἄπειτα τὴν θρέψασαν αὐτὸ δεῖ λαβεῖν.for our own, but to live our life in, and after that its mother earth must take it back again. Dost think ’tis Argos thou art injuring in refusing burial to the dead? Nay! all Hellas shares herein, if a man rob the dead of their due


δοκεῖς κακουργεῖν ̓́Αργος οὐ θάπτων νεκρούς;for our own, but to live our life in, and after that its mother earth must take it back again. Dost think ’tis Argos thou art injuring in refusing burial to the dead? Nay! all Hellas shares herein, if a man rob the dead of their due


ἥκιστα: πάσης ̔Ελλάδος κοινὸν τόδεfor our own, but to live our life in, and after that its mother earth must take it back again. Dost think ’tis Argos thou art injuring in refusing burial to the dead? Nay! all Hellas shares herein, if a man rob the dead of their due


εἰ τοὺς θανόντας νοσφίσας ὧν χρῆν λαχεῖνfor our own, but to live our life in, and after that its mother earth must take it back again. Dost think ’tis Argos thou art injuring in refusing burial to the dead? Nay! all Hellas shares herein, if a man rob the dead of their due


ἀτάφους τις ἕξει: δειλίαν γὰρ ἐσφέρειand keep them from the tomb; for, if this law be enacted, it will strike dismay into the stoutest hearts. And art thou come to cast dire threats at me, while thy own folk are afraid of giving burial to the dead? What is your fear? Think you they will undermine your land


τοῖς ἀλκίμοισιν οὗτος ἢν τεθῇ νόμος.and keep them from the tomb; for, if this law be enacted, it will strike dismay into the stoutest hearts. And art thou come to cast dire threats at me, while thy own folk are afraid of giving burial to the dead? What is your fear? Think you they will undermine your land


κἀμοὶ μὲν ἦλθες δείν' ἀπειλήσων ἔπηand keep them from the tomb; for, if this law be enacted, it will strike dismay into the stoutest hearts. And art thou come to cast dire threats at me, while thy own folk are afraid of giving burial to the dead? What is your fear? Think you they will undermine your land


νεκροὺς δὲ ταρβεῖτ', εἰ κρυβήσονται χθονί;and keep them from the tomb; for, if this law be enacted, it will strike dismay into the stoutest hearts. And art thou come to cast dire threats at me, while thy own folk are afraid of giving burial to the dead? What is your fear? Think you they will undermine your land


τί μὴ γένηται; μὴ κατασκάψωσι γῆνand keep them from the tomb; for, if this law be enacted, it will strike dismay into the stoutest hearts. And art thou come to cast dire threats at me, while thy own folk are afraid of giving burial to the dead? What is your fear? Think you they will undermine your land


ταφέντες ὑμῶν; ἢ τέκν' ἐν μυχῷ χθονὸςin their graves, or that they will beget children in the womb of earth, from whom shall rise an avenger? A silly waste of words, in truth it was, to show your fear of paltry groundless terrors.


φύσωσιν, ἐξ ὧν εἶσί τις τιμωρία;in their graves, or that they will beget children in the womb of earth, from whom shall rise an avenger? A silly waste of words, in truth it was, to show your fear of paltry groundless terrors.


σκαιόν γε τἀνάλωμα τῆς γλώσσης τόδεin their graves, or that they will beget children in the womb of earth, from whom shall rise an avenger? A silly waste of words, in truth it was, to show your fear of paltry groundless terrors.


φόβους πονηροὺς καὶ κενοὺς δεδοικέναι.in their graves, or that they will beget children in the womb of earth, from whom shall rise an avenger? A silly waste of words, in truth it was, to show your fear of paltry groundless terrors.


ἀλλ', ὦ μάταιοι, γνῶτε τἀνθρώπων κακά:Go, triflers, learn the lesson of human misery;


παλαίσμαθ' ἡμῶν ὁ βίος: εὐτυχοῦσι δὲour life is made up of struggles; some men there be that find their fortune soon, others have to wait, while some at once are blest. Fortune lives a dainty life; to her the wretched pays his court and homage to win her smile; her likewise doth the prosperous man extol, for fear the favouring gale


οἳ μὲν τάχ', οἳ δ' ἐσαῦθις, οἳ δ' ἤδη βροτῶνour life is made up of struggles; some men there be that find their fortune soon, others have to wait, while some at once are blest. Fortune lives a dainty life; to her the wretched pays his court and homage to win her smile; her likewise doth the prosperous man extol, for fear the favouring gale


τρυφᾷ δ' ὁ δαίμων: πρός τε γὰρ τοῦ δυστυχοῦςour life is made up of struggles; some men there be that find their fortune soon, others have to wait, while some at once are blest. Fortune lives a dainty life; to her the wretched pays his court and homage to win her smile; her likewise doth the prosperous man extol, for fear the favouring gale


ὡς εὐτυχήσῃ, τίμιος γεραίρεταιour life is made up of struggles; some men there be that find their fortune soon, others have to wait, while some at once are blest. Fortune lives a dainty life; to her the wretched pays his court and homage to win her smile; her likewise doth the prosperous man extol, for fear the favouring gale


ὅ τ' ὄλβιός νιν πνεῦμα δειμαίνων λιπεῖνour life is made up of struggles; some men there be that find their fortune soon, others have to wait, while some at once are blest. Fortune lives a dainty life; to her the wretched pays his court and homage to win her smile; her likewise doth the prosperous man extol, for fear the favouring gale


ὑψηλὸν αἴρει. γνόντας οὖν χρεὼν τάδεmay leave him. These lessons should we take to heart, to bear with moderation, free from wrath, our wrongs, and do naught to hurt a whole city. What then? Let us, who will the pious deed perform, bury the corpses of the slain.


ἀδικουμένους τε μέτρια μὴ θυμῷ φέρεινmay leave him. These lessons should we take to heart, to bear with moderation, free from wrath, our wrongs, and do naught to hurt a whole city. What then? Let us, who will the pious deed perform, bury the corpses of the slain.


ἀδικεῖν τε τοιαῦθ' οἷα μὴ βλάψαι πόλιν.may leave him. These lessons should we take to heart, to bear with moderation, free from wrath, our wrongs, and do naught to hurt a whole city. What then? Let us, who will the pious deed perform, bury the corpses of the slain.


πῶς οὖν ἂν εἴη; τοὺς ὀλωλότας νεκροὺςmay leave him. These lessons should we take to heart, to bear with moderation, free from wrath, our wrongs, and do naught to hurt a whole city. What then? Let us, who will the pious deed perform, bury the corpses of the slain.


θάψαι δὸς ἡμῖν τοῖς θέλουσιν εὐσεβεῖν.may leave him. These lessons should we take to heart, to bear with moderation, free from wrath, our wrongs, and do naught to hurt a whole city. What then? Let us, who will the pious deed perform, bury the corpses of the slain.


ἢ δῆλα τἀνθένδ': εἶμι καὶ θάψω βίᾳ.Else is the issue clear; I will go and bury them by force. For never shall it be proclaimed through Hellas that heaven’s ancient law was set at naught, when it devolved on me and the city of Pandion. Choru


οὐ γάρ ποτ' εἰς ̔́Ελληνας ἐξοισθήσεταιElse is the issue clear; I will go and bury them by force. For never shall it be proclaimed through Hellas that heaven’s ancient law was set at naught, when it devolved on me and the city of Pandion. Choru


ὡς εἰς ἔμ' ἐλθὼν καὶ πόλιν ΠανδίονοςElse is the issue clear; I will go and bury them by force. For never shall it be proclaimed through Hellas that heaven’s ancient law was set at naught, when it devolved on me and the city of Pandion. Choru


νόμος παλαιὸς δαιμόνων διεφθάρη.Else is the issue clear; I will go and bury them by force. For never shall it be proclaimed through Hellas that heaven’s ancient law was set at naught, when it devolved on me and the city of Pandion. Choru


θάρσει: τὸ γάρ τοι τῆς Δίκης σῴζων φάοςBe of good cheer; for if thou preserve the light of justice


πολλοὺς ὑπεκφύγοις ἂν ἀνθρώπων ψόγους.thou shalt escape many a charge that men might urge. Herald


βούλῃ συνάψω μῦθον ἐν βραχεῖ †σέθεν†;Wilt thou that I sum up in brief all thou wouldst say? Theseu


λέγ', εἴ τι βούλῃ: καὶ γὰρ οὐ σιγηλὸς εἶ.Say what thou wilt; for thou art not silent as it is. Herald


οὐκ ἄν ποτ' ἐκ γῆς παῖδας ̓Αργείων λάβοις.Thou shalt never take the sons of Argos from our land. Theseu


κἀμοῦ νυν ἀντάκουσον, εἰ βούλῃ, πάλιν.Hear, then, my answer too to that, if so thou wilt. Herald


κλύοιμ' ἄν: οὐ γὰρ ἀλλὰ δεῖ δοῦναι μέρος.I will hear thee; not that I wish it, but I must give thee thy turn. Theseu


θάψω νεκροὺς γῆς ἐξελὼν ̓Ασωπίας.I will bury the dead, when from Asopus’ land I have removed them. Herald


ἐν ἀσπίσιν σοι πρῶτα κινδυνευτέον.First must thou adventure somewhat in the front of war. Theseu


πολλοὺς ἔτλην δὴ †χἁτέρους ἄλλους πόνους†.Many an enterprise and of a different kind have I ere this endured. Herald


ἦ πᾶσιν οὖν ς' ἔφυσεν ἐξαρκεῖν πατήρ;Wert thou then begotten of thy sire to cope with every foe? Theseu


ὅσοι γ' ὑβρισταί: χρηστὰ δ' οὐ κολάζομεν.Ay, with all wanton villains; virtue I punish not. Herald


πράσσειν σὺ πόλλ' εἴωθας ἥ τε σὴ πόλις.To meddle is aye thy wont and thy city’s too. Theseu


τοιγὰρ πονοῦσα πολλὰ πόλλ' εὐδαιμονεῖ.Hence her enterprise on many a held hath won her frequent success. Herald


ἔλθ', ὥς σε λόγχη σπαρτὸς ἐν πόλει λάβῃ.Come then, that the warriors of the dragon-crop may catch thee in our city. Theseu


τίς δ' ἐκ δράκοντος θοῦρος ἂν γένοιτ' ̓́Αρης;What furious warrior-host could spring from dragon’s seed? Herald


γνώσῃ σὺ πάσχων: νῦν δ' ἔτ' εἶ νεανίας.Thou shalt learn that to thy cost. As yet thou art young and rash. Theseu


οὔτοι μ' ἐπαρεῖς ὥστε θυμῶσαι φρέναςThy boastful speech stirs not my heart at all to rage. Yet get thee gone from my land, taking with thee the idle words thou broughtest; for we are making no advance. [Exit Herald.]


τοῖς σοῖσι κόμποις: ἀλλ' ἀποστέλλου χθονόςThy boastful speech stirs not my heart at all to rage. Yet get thee gone from my land, taking with thee the idle words thou broughtest; for we are making no advance. [Exit Herald.]


λόγους ματαίους οὕσπερ ἠνέγκω λαβών.Thy boastful speech stirs not my heart at all to rage. Yet get thee gone from my land, taking with thee the idle words thou broughtest; for we are making no advance. [Exit Herald.]


περαίνομεν γὰρ οὐδέν.Thy boastful speech stirs not my heart at all to rage. Yet get thee gone from my land, taking with thee the idle words thou broughtest; for we are making no advance. [Exit Herald.]


ὁρμᾶσθαι χρεὼνeach stout footman, and whoso mounts the car; ’tis time the bit, dripping with foam, should urge the charger on toward the land of Cadmus. For I will march in person to the seven gates thereof


πάντ' ἄνδρ' ὁπλίτην ἁρμάτων τ' ἐπεμβάτηνeach stout footman, and whoso mounts the car; ’tis time the bit, dripping with foam, should urge the charger on toward the land of Cadmus. For I will march in person to the seven gates thereof


μοναμπύκων τε φάλαρα κινεῖσθαι στόμαeach stout footman, and whoso mounts the car; ’tis time the bit, dripping with foam, should urge the charger on toward the land of Cadmus. For I will march in person to the seven gates thereof


ἀφρῷ καταστάζοντα Καδμείαν χθόνα.each stout footman, and whoso mounts the car; ’tis time the bit, dripping with foam, should urge the charger on toward the land of Cadmus. For I will march in person to the seven gates thereof


χωρήσομαι γὰρ ἑπτὰ πρὸς Κάδμου πύλαςeach stout footman, and whoso mounts the car; ’tis time the bit, dripping with foam, should urge the charger on toward the land of Cadmus. For I will march in person to the seven gates thereof


αὐτός τε κῆρυξ. σοὶ δὲ προστάσσω μένεινeach stout footman, and whoso mounts the car; ’tis time the bit, dripping with foam, should urge the charger on toward the land of Cadmus. For I will march in person to the seven gates thereof


αὐτὸς σίδηρον ὀξὺν ἐν χεροῖν ἔχωνwith the sharp sword in my hand, and be myself my herald. But thee, Adrastus, I bid stay, nor blend with mine thy fortunes, for I will take my own good star to lead my host, a chieftain famed in famous deeds of arms. One thing alone I need, the favour of all gods that reverence right, for the presence of these thing


̓́Αδραστε, κἀμοὶ μὴ ἀναμίγνυσθαι τύχαςwith the sharp sword in my hand, and be myself my herald. But thee, Adrastus, I bid stay, nor blend with mine thy fortunes, for I will take my own good star to lead my host, a chieftain famed in famous deeds of arms. One thing alone I need, the favour of all gods that reverence right, for the presence of these thing


τὰς σάς. ἐγὼ γὰρ δαίμονος τοὐμοῦ μέταwith the sharp sword in my hand, and be myself my herald. But thee, Adrastus, I bid stay, nor blend with mine thy fortunes, for I will take my own good star to lead my host, a chieftain famed in famous deeds of arms. One thing alone I need, the favour of all gods that reverence right, for the presence of these thing


στρατηλατήσω καινὸς ἐν καινῷ δορί.with the sharp sword in my hand, and be myself my herald. But thee, Adrastus, I bid stay, nor blend with mine thy fortunes, for I will take my own good star to lead my host, a chieftain famed in famous deeds of arms. One thing alone I need, the favour of all gods that reverence right, for the presence of these thing


ἓν δεῖ μόνον μοι: τοὺς θεοὺς ἔχειν, ὅσοιwith the sharp sword in my hand, and be myself my herald. But thee, Adrastus, I bid stay, nor blend with mine thy fortunes, for I will take my own good star to lead my host, a chieftain famed in famous deeds of arms. One thing alone I need, the favour of all gods that reverence right, for the presence of these thing


δίκην σέβονται: ταῦτα γὰρ ξυνόνθ' ὁμοῦinsures victory. For their valour availeth men naught, unless they have the god’s goodwill. [Exit Theseus. The following lines between the Semi-Choruses are chanted responsively. 1st Half-Choru


νίκην δίδωσιν. ἁρετὴ δ' οὐδὲν λέγειinsures victory. For their valour availeth men naught, unless they have the god’s goodwill. [Exit Theseus. The following lines between the Semi-Choruses are chanted responsively. 1st Half-Choru


βροτοῖσιν, ἢ μὴ τὸν θεὸν χρῄζοντ' ἔχῃ.insures victory. For their valour availeth men naught, unless they have the god’s goodwill. [Exit Theseus. The following lines between the Semi-Choruses are chanted responsively. 1st Half-Choru


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

33 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Homer, Iliad, 2.494, 2.557 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.494. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.557. /Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls
3. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 699, 911-953, 604 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

604. δήμου κρατοῦσα χεὶρ ὅπῃ πληθύνεται. Δαναός
4. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6.17 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 629-664, 628 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

628. ἐξ οὗ γε χοροῖσιν ἐφέστηκεν τρυγικοῖς ὁ διδάσκαλος ἡμῶν
6. Aristophanes, Knights, 506-550, 505 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

505. ὦ παντοίας ἤδη Μούσης
7. Aristophanes, Frogs, 676-705, 710, 718-733, 675 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

675. Μοῦσα χορῶν ἱερῶν: ἐπίβηθι καὶ ἔλθ' ἐπὶ τέρψιν ἀοιδᾶς ἐμᾶς
8. Euripides, Bacchae, 266-329, 265 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

265. Ἐχίονος δʼ ὢν παῖς καταισχύνεις γένος; Τειρεσίας 265. Do you, the child of Echion, bring shame to your race? Teiresia
9. Euripides, Electra, 1025-1029, 1032, 1035, 1024 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Fragments, 1013-1015, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 141-164, 217-229, 236-237, 240-246, 266-267, 140 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1013-1015, 58, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Ion, 596-606, 595 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

595. and if I win my way to the highest place in the state, and seek to be some one, I shall be hated by those who have no influence, for superiority is galling; while ’mongst men of worth who could show their wisdom, but are silent, and take no interest in politics
14. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 144-145, 160-167, 214-266, 271-276, 282-303, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Euripides, Orestes, 885-887, 903-913, 943-949, 884 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

884. Now when the Argives were fully gathered
16. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 550-567, 549 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

549. Why do you honor to excess tyranny, a prosperous injustice
17. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 238-245, 286-364, 381-452, 454-597, 857-917, 955-989, 187 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Herodotus, Histories, 1.61.1-1.61.2, 3.1, 3.80.5, 7.139 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.1. Cyrus' son Cambyses was leading an army of his subjects, Ionian and Aeolian Greeks among them, against this Amasis for the following reason. Cambyses had sent a herald to Egypt asking Amasis for his daughter; he asked on the advice of an Egyptian, who advised it out of resentment against Amasis, that out of all the Egyptian physicians Amasis had dragged him away from his wife and children and sent him up to Persia when Cyrus sent to Amasis asking for the best eye-doctor in Egypt . ,Out of resentment, the Egyptian by his advice induced Cambyses to ask Amasis for his daughter, so that Amasis would either be wretched if he gave her, or hated by Cambyses if he did not. Amasis, intimidated by the power of Persia and frightened, could neither give his daughter nor refuse her; for he knew well that Cambyses was not going to take her as his wife but as his concubine. ,After considering the matter, he did as follows. There was a daughter of the former king Apries, all that was left of that family, quite tall and pretty, and her name was Nitetis; this girl Amasis adorned with clothes and gold and sent to Cambyses as his own daughter. ,But after a time, as he embraced her addressing her as the daughter of Amasis, the girl said to him, “O King, you do not understand how you have been made a fool of by Amasis, who dressed me in finery and sent me to you as his own daughter, when I am in fact the daughter of Apries, the ruler Amasis revolted from with the Egyptians and killed.” ,This speech and this crime that occurred turned Cyrus' son Cambyses, furiously angry, against Egypt . So the Persians say. 3.80.5. of all men he is the most inconsistent; for if you admire him modestly he is angry that you do not give him excessive attention, but if one gives him excessive attention he is angry because one is a flatter. But I have yet worse to say of him than that; he upsets the ancestral ways and rapes women and kills indiscriminately. 7.139. Here I am forced to declare an opinion which will be displeasing to most, but I will not refrain from saying what seems to me to be true. ,Had the Athenians been panic-struck by the threatened peril and left their own country, or had they not indeed left it but remained and surrendered themselves to Xerxes, none would have attempted to withstand the king by sea. What would have happened on land if no one had resisted the king by sea is easy enough to determine. ,Although the Peloponnesians had built not one but many walls across the Isthmus for their defense, they would nevertheless have been deserted by their allies (these having no choice or free will in the matter, but seeing their cities taken one by one by the foreign fleet), until at last they would have stood alone. They would then have put up quite a fight and perished nobly. ,Such would have been their fate. Perhaps, however, when they saw the rest of Hellas siding with the enemy, they would have made terms with Xerxes. In either case Hellas would have been subdued by the Persians, for I cannot see what advantage could accrue from the walls built across the isthmus, while the king was master of the seas. ,As it is, to say that the Athenians were the saviors of Hellas is to hit the truth. It was the Athenians who held the balance; whichever side they joined was sure to prevail. choosing that Greece should preserve her freedom, the Athenians roused to battle the other Greek states which had not yet gone over to the Persians and, after the gods, were responsible for driving the king off. ,Nor were they moved to desert Hellas by the threatening oracles which came from Delphi and sorely dismayed them, but they stood firm and had the courage to meet the invader of their country.
19. Isocrates, Orations, 4.93, 4.95-4.99 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

20. Lysias, Orations, 2.33-2.45 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

21. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

471a. Pol. Then this Archelaus, on your statement, is wretched? Soc. Yes, my friend, supposing he is unjust. Pol. Well, but how can he be other than unjust? He had no claim to the throne which he now occupies, being the son of a woman who was a slave of Perdiccas’ brother Alcetas, and in mere justice he was Alcetas’ slave; and if he wished to do what is just, he would be serving Alcetas and would be happy, by your account; but, as it is, he has become a prodigy of wretchedness
22. Sophocles, Ajax, 712 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

23. Sophocles, Antigone, 160, 843, 940, 988, 159 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

24. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 914, 929-931, 913 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

25. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.42, 1.73.2-1.73.74, 2.20-2.23, 2.37-2.41, 2.52-2.53, 2.57-2.65, 2.67-2.68, 2.71-2.77, 3.37-3.48, 4.77, 4.89-4.101 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.73.2. We need not refer to remote antiquity: there we could appeal to the voice of tradition, but not to the experience of our audience. But to the Median war and contemporary history we must refer, although we are rather tired of continually bringing this subject forward. In our action during that war we ran great risk to obtain certain advantages: you had your share in the solid results, do not try to rob us of all share in the good that the glory may do us. 1.73.3. However, the story shall be told not so much to deprecate hostility as to testify against it, and to show, if you are so ill-advised as to enter into a struggle with Athens, what sort of an antagonist she is likely to prove. 1.73.4. We assert that at Marathon we were at the front, and faced the barbarian single-handed. That when he came the second time, unable to cope with him by land we went on board our ships with all our people, and joined in the action at Salamis . This prevented his taking the Peloponnesian states in detail, and ravaging them with his fleet; when the multitude of his vessels would have made any combination for self-defence impossible. 1.73.5. The best proof of this was furnished by the invader himself. Defeated at sea, he considered his power to be no longer what it had been, and retired as speedily as possible with the greater part of his army.
26. Aristotle, Rhetoric, 1.15 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

27. Demosthenes, Against Meidias, 150 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

28. Strabo, Geography, 9.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.1.10. At the present time the island is held by the Athenians, although in early times there was strife between them and the Megarians for its possession. Some say that it was Peisistratus, others Solon, who inserted in the Catalogue of Ships immediately after the verse, and Aias brought twelve ships from Salamis, the verse, and, bringing them, halted them where the battalions of the Athenians were stationed, and then used the poet as a witness that the island had belonged to the Athenians from the beginning. But the critics do not accept this interpretation, because many of the verses bear witness to the contrary. For why is Aias found in the last place in the ship-camp, not with the Athenians, but with the Thessalians under Protesilaus? Here were the ships of Aias and Protesilaus. And in the Visitation of the troops, Agamemnon found Menestheus the charioteer, son of Peteos, standing still; and about him were the Athenians, masters of the battle-cry. And near by stood Odysseus of many wiles, and about him, at his side, the ranks of the Cephallenians. And back again to Aias and the Salaminians, he came to the Aiantes, and near them, Idomeneus on the other side, not Menestheus. The Athenians, then, are reputed to have cited alleged testimony of this kind from Homer, and the Megarians to have replied with the following parody: Aias brought ships from Salamis, from Polichne, from Aegeirussa, from Nisaea, and from Tripodes; these four are Megarian places, and, of these, Tripodes is called Tripodiscium, near which the present marketplace of the Megarians is situated.
29. Plutarch, Solon, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

30. Aelian, Varia Historia, 12.43 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

31. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
32. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.35.3, 6.5.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.35.3. There are still the remains of a market-place, a temple of Ajax and his statue in ebony. Even at the present day the Athenians pay honors to Ajax himself and to Eurysaces, for there is an altar of Eurysaces also at Athens . In Salamis is shown a stone not far from the harbor, on which they say that Telamon sat when he gazed at the ship in which his children were sailing away to Aulis to take part in the joint expedition of the Greeks. 6.5.7. Dareius, the bastard son of Artaxerxes, who with the support of the Persian common people put down Sogdius, the legitimate son of Artaxerxes, and ascended the throne in his stead, learning when he was king of the exploits of Pulydamas, sent messengers with the promise of gifts and persuaded him to come before his presence at Susa . There he challenged three of the Persians called Immortals to fight him—one against three— and killed them. of his exploits enumerated, some are represented on the pedestal of the statue at Olympia, and others are set forth in the inscription.
33. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.48 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.48. And lest it should be thought that he had acquired Salamis by force only and not of right, he opened certain graves and showed that the dead were buried with their faces to the east, as was the custom of burial among the Athenians; further, that the tombs themselves faced the east, and that the inscriptions graven upon them named the deceased by their demes, which is a style peculiar to Athens. Some authors assert that in Homer's catalogue of the ships after the line:Ajax twelve ships from Salamis commands,Solon inserted one of his own:And fixed their station next the Athenian bands.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adrastus (hero) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 185
aeschylus, dramas by\n, eumenides Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
aeschylus, dramas by\n, suppliant women Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
aeschylus, on theseus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
aeschylus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
aethra Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
agon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188, 587
aiantis tribe, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
alcibiades Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188
alexandros Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
alope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
amasis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
anonymus iamblichi, iamblichus framing of Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 290
anonymus iamblichi, importance of Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 290
antiope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
archelaus of macedon Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
archeology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
argos, and athens Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
aristophanes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
artaxerxes i Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
athens, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
athens, and identity Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
athens, imperialism (athenian) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
athens Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
athens and athenians, and religious authority Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
athens and athenians, cults and cult places of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
athens and athenians, in persian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
athens and athenians, marriage customs of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
cadmus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
cambyses Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
chorus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
choruses/choreuts, tragic Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
choruses/choreuts Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
community Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
concubines Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
creon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
creon (king of thebes) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
danaus, daughters of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
darius ii Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
deception, opposed to hoplitism Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
delphi Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
democracy, athenian, thucydides depiction of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
democracy, in athens Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
democracy, in tragedy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 184, 185
democracy and monarchy, debate between theseus and theban herald on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
dramatic festivals, discursive parameters Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
egypt and egyptians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
egyptus, sons of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
epitaphioi logoi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
eteocles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
euripides, dramas by\n, suppliant women Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 184, 185
euripides, on theseus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
euripides, supplices Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
euripides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
euripides suppliant women, dating Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
euripides suppliant women, interpretation Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
exarchos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
freedom of speech (parrhesia) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 185
general theseus, mythic image of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
herodotus, and the athenian audience Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
herodotus, historical perspective of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
herodotus, on tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
imitation Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
impiety Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
marriage customs, of athenians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
marriage customs, of royalty Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
marriage customs, of tyrants Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
men of eleusis, the (aeschylus) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
metalepsis, of theseus in suppliant women Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
mills, s. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
monarchy and democracy, debate between theseus and theban herald on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
morwood, j. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188
myths, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
naples, bilingualism in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
nicias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188
nothoi Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
oedipus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
oligarchs/oligarchy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
oracles, delphic Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
oracles, interpreted by athenians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
oratory Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
pallakai and pallakides Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
peirithous Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
peisistratus and peisistratids Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
pelasgus, as a democratic king Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
peloponnese Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
peloponnesian war Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
pericles, on deceit Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
pericles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
persia and persians, war with greeks Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
plato Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
polynices Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
practice (askēsis, meletē), in ionian thought Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 290
praise Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
priam Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
sansone, d. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
siluae, imperialism in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
socrates Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
sophism of theseus in suppliant women' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
sophocles, dramas by\n, antigone Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles, dramas by\n, trachiniae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
sophocles (tragic poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sparta, agoge Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
sparta, education system Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
sparta, krupteia Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
statius, and euripides Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
statius, and greek tragedy Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
statius, father of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
suppliant women, the (aeschylus) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188, 587, 865
suppliant women metaleptic role of theseus in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
suppliant women theban herald, debate on democracy and monarchy between theseus and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
suppliants, the (euripides) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
theatre Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
thebes, and athens Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
thebes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
theseus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
thucydides, and herodotus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
thucydides, funeral speech Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
thucydides, on persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
thucydides, on spartans Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
tragedy, choruses of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
tyranny, greek attitudes towards Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
tyranny, metaphysics of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 101
tyrants/ tyranny Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
xenophon, and spartan custom Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
xerxes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311