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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5640
Euripides, Suppliant Women, 414-416


τὸ δ' αὐτίχ' ἡδὺς καὶ διδοὺς πολλὴν χάρινfor the city, whence I come, is ruled by one man only, not by the mob; none there puffs up the citizens with specious words, and for his own advantage twists them this way or that,—one moment dear to them and lavish of his favours


ἐσαῦθις ἔβλαψ', εἶτα διαβολαῖς νέαιςthe next a bane to all; and yet by fresh calumnies of others he hides his former failures and escapes punishment. Besides, how shall the people, if it cannot form true judgments, be able rightly to direct the state? Nay, ’tis time, not haste, that affords a better


κλέψας τὰ πρόσθε σφάλματ' ἐξέδυ δίκης.the next a bane to all; and yet by fresh calumnies of others he hides his former failures and escapes punishment. Besides, how shall the people, if it cannot form true judgments, be able rightly to direct the state? Nay, ’tis time, not haste, that affords a better


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

32 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.494, 2.557 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.494. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.557. /Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls
2. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 699, 911-953, 604 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

604. δήμου κρατοῦσα χεὶρ ὅπῃ πληθύνεται. Δαναός
3. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6.17 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 629-664, 628 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

628. ἐξ οὗ γε χοροῖσιν ἐφέστηκεν τρυγικοῖς ὁ διδάσκαλος ἡμῶν
5. Aristophanes, Knights, 506-550, 505 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

505. ὦ παντοίας ἤδη Μούσης
6. Aristophanes, Frogs, 676-705, 710, 718-733, 675 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

675. Μοῦσα χορῶν ἱερῶν: ἐπίβηθι καὶ ἔλθ' ἐπὶ τέρψιν ἀοιδᾶς ἐμᾶς
7. Euripides, Bacchae, 266-329, 265 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

265. Ἐχίονος δʼ ὢν παῖς καταισχύνεις γένος; Τειρεσίας 265. Do you, the child of Echion, bring shame to your race? Teiresia
8. Euripides, Electra, 1025-1029, 1032, 1035, 1024 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Fragments, 1013-1015, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Hecuba, 549-570, 548 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

548. ἑκοῦσα θνῄσκω: μή τις ἅψηται χροὸς
11. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 141-164, 217-229, 236-237, 240-246, 266-267, 140 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1013-1015, 58, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Ion, 596-606, 595 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

595. and if I win my way to the highest place in the state, and seek to be some one, I shall be hated by those who have no influence, for superiority is galling; while ’mongst men of worth who could show their wisdom, but are silent, and take no interest in politics
14. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 144-145, 160-167, 214-266, 271-276, 282-303, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Euripides, Orestes, 885-887, 903-913, 943-949, 884 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

884. Now when the Argives were fully gathered
16. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 550-567, 549 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

549. Why do you honor to excess tyranny, a prosperous injustice
17. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1112-1113, 1132, 1143, 1146-1150, 187, 232-245, 286-364, 381-413, 415-597, 857-917, 955-989, 1111 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Herodotus, Histories, 3.80-3.82, 7.139 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.80. After the tumult quieted down, and five days passed, the rebels against the Magi held a council on the whole state of affairs, at which sentiments were uttered which to some Greeks seem incredible, but there is no doubt that they were spoken. ,Otanes was for turning the government over to the Persian people: “It seems to me,” he said, “that there can no longer be a single sovereign over us, for that is not pleasant or good. You saw the insolence of Cambyses, how far it went, and you had your share of the insolence of the Magus. ,How can monarchy be a fit thing, when the ruler can do what he wants with impunity? Give this power to the best man on earth, and it would stir him to unaccustomed thoughts. Insolence is created in him by the good things to hand, while from birth envy is rooted in man. ,Acquiring the two he possesses complete evil; for being satiated he does many reckless things, some from insolence, some from envy. And yet an absolute ruler ought to be free of envy, having all good things; but he becomes the opposite of this towards his citizens; he envies the best who thrive and live, and is pleased by the worst of his fellows; and he is the best confidant of slander. ,of all men he is the most inconsistent; for if you admire him modestly he is angry that you do not give him excessive attention, but if one gives him excessive attention he is angry because one is a flatter. But I have yet worse to say of him than that; he upsets the ancestral ways and rapes women and kills indiscriminately. ,But the rule of the multitude has in the first place the loveliest name of all, equality, and does in the second place none of the things that a monarch does. It determines offices by lot, and holds power accountable, and conducts all deliberating publicly. Therefore I give my opinion that we make an end of monarchy and exalt the multitude, for all things are possible for the majority.” 3.81. Such was the judgment of Otanes: but Megabyzus urged that they resort to an oligarchy. “I agree,” said he, “with all that Otanes says against the rule of one; but when he tells you to give the power to the multitude, his judgment strays from the best. Nothing is more foolish and violent than a useless mob; ,for men fleeing the insolence of a tyrant to fall victim to the insolence of the unguided populace is by no means to be tolerated. Whatever the one does, he does with knowledge, but for the other knowledge is impossible; how can they have knowledge who have not learned or seen for themselves what is best, but always rush headlong and drive blindly onward, like a river in flood? ,Let those like democracy who wish ill to Persia ; but let us choose a group of the best men and invest these with the power. For we ourselves shall be among them, and among the best men it is likely that there will be the best counsels.” 3.82. Such was the judgment of Megabyzus. Darius was the third to express his opinion. “It seems to me,” he said, “that Megabyzus speaks well concerning democracy but not concerning oligarchy. For if the three are proposed and all are at their best for the sake of argument, the best democracy and oligarchy and monarchy, I hold that monarchy is by far the most excellent. ,One could describe nothing better than the rule of the one best man; using the best judgment, he will govern the multitude with perfect wisdom, and best conceal plans made for the defeat of enemies. ,But in an oligarchy, the desire of many to do the state good service often produces bitter hate among them; for because each one wishes to be first and to make his opinions prevail, violent hate is the outcome, from which comes faction and from faction killing, and from killing it reverts to monarchy, and by this is shown how much better monarchy is. ,Then again, when the people rule it is impossible that wickedness will not occur; and when wickedness towards the state occurs, hatred does not result among the wicked, but strong alliances; for those that want to do the state harm conspire to do it together. This goes on until one of the people rises to stop such men. He therefore becomes the people's idol, and being their idol is made their monarch; and thus he also proves that monarchy is best. ,But (to conclude the whole matter in one word) tell me, where did freedom come from for us and who gave it, from the people or an oligarchy or a single ruler? I believe, therefore, that we who were liberated through one man should maintain such a government, and, besides this, that we should not alter our ancestral ways that are good; that would not be better.” 7.139. Here I am forced to declare an opinion which will be displeasing to most, but I will not refrain from saying what seems to me to be true. ,Had the Athenians been panic-struck by the threatened peril and left their own country, or had they not indeed left it but remained and surrendered themselves to Xerxes, none would have attempted to withstand the king by sea. What would have happened on land if no one had resisted the king by sea is easy enough to determine. ,Although the Peloponnesians had built not one but many walls across the Isthmus for their defense, they would nevertheless have been deserted by their allies (these having no choice or free will in the matter, but seeing their cities taken one by one by the foreign fleet), until at last they would have stood alone. They would then have put up quite a fight and perished nobly. ,Such would have been their fate. Perhaps, however, when they saw the rest of Hellas siding with the enemy, they would have made terms with Xerxes. In either case Hellas would have been subdued by the Persians, for I cannot see what advantage could accrue from the walls built across the isthmus, while the king was master of the seas. ,As it is, to say that the Athenians were the saviors of Hellas is to hit the truth. It was the Athenians who held the balance; whichever side they joined was sure to prevail. choosing that Greece should preserve her freedom, the Athenians roused to battle the other Greek states which had not yet gone over to the Persians and, after the gods, were responsible for driving the king off. ,Nor were they moved to desert Hellas by the threatening oracles which came from Delphi and sorely dismayed them, but they stood firm and had the courage to meet the invader of their country.
19. Isocrates, Orations, 4.93, 4.95-4.99 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

20. Lysias, Orations, 2.33-2.45 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

21. Sophocles, Ajax, 712 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

22. Sophocles, Antigone, 160, 843, 940, 988, 159 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

23. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 914, 929-931, 913 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

24. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.42, 1.73.2-1.73.74, 2.20-2.23, 2.37-2.41, 2.52-2.53, 2.57-2.65, 2.67-2.68, 2.71-2.77, 3.37-3.48, 4.77, 4.89-4.101 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.73.2. We need not refer to remote antiquity: there we could appeal to the voice of tradition, but not to the experience of our audience. But to the Median war and contemporary history we must refer, although we are rather tired of continually bringing this subject forward. In our action during that war we ran great risk to obtain certain advantages: you had your share in the solid results, do not try to rob us of all share in the good that the glory may do us. 1.73.3. However, the story shall be told not so much to deprecate hostility as to testify against it, and to show, if you are so ill-advised as to enter into a struggle with Athens, what sort of an antagonist she is likely to prove. 1.73.4. We assert that at Marathon we were at the front, and faced the barbarian single-handed. That when he came the second time, unable to cope with him by land we went on board our ships with all our people, and joined in the action at Salamis . This prevented his taking the Peloponnesian states in detail, and ravaging them with his fleet; when the multitude of his vessels would have made any combination for self-defence impossible. 1.73.5. The best proof of this was furnished by the invader himself. Defeated at sea, he considered his power to be no longer what it had been, and retired as speedily as possible with the greater part of his army.
25. Xenophon, Constitution of The Athenians, 1.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

26. Aristotle, Rhetoric, 1.15 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

27. Demosthenes, Against Meidias, 150 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

28. Strabo, Geography, 9.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.1.10. At the present time the island is held by the Athenians, although in early times there was strife between them and the Megarians for its possession. Some say that it was Peisistratus, others Solon, who inserted in the Catalogue of Ships immediately after the verse, and Aias brought twelve ships from Salamis, the verse, and, bringing them, halted them where the battalions of the Athenians were stationed, and then used the poet as a witness that the island had belonged to the Athenians from the beginning. But the critics do not accept this interpretation, because many of the verses bear witness to the contrary. For why is Aias found in the last place in the ship-camp, not with the Athenians, but with the Thessalians under Protesilaus? Here were the ships of Aias and Protesilaus. And in the Visitation of the troops, Agamemnon found Menestheus the charioteer, son of Peteos, standing still; and about him were the Athenians, masters of the battle-cry. And near by stood Odysseus of many wiles, and about him, at his side, the ranks of the Cephallenians. And back again to Aias and the Salaminians, he came to the Aiantes, and near them, Idomeneus on the other side, not Menestheus. The Athenians, then, are reputed to have cited alleged testimony of this kind from Homer, and the Megarians to have replied with the following parody: Aias brought ships from Salamis, from Polichne, from Aegeirussa, from Nisaea, and from Tripodes; these four are Megarian places, and, of these, Tripodes is called Tripodiscium, near which the present marketplace of the Megarians is situated.
29. Plutarch, Solon, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

30. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
31. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.35.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.35.3. There are still the remains of a market-place, a temple of Ajax and his statue in ebony. Even at the present day the Athenians pay honors to Ajax himself and to Eurysaces, for there is an altar of Eurysaces also at Athens . In Salamis is shown a stone not far from the harbor, on which they say that Telamon sat when he gazed at the ship in which his children were sailing away to Aulis to take part in the joint expedition of the Greeks.
32. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.48 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.48. And lest it should be thought that he had acquired Salamis by force only and not of right, he opened certain graves and showed that the dead were buried with their faces to the east, as was the custom of burial among the Athenians; further, that the tombs themselves faced the east, and that the inscriptions graven upon them named the deceased by their demes, which is a style peculiar to Athens. Some authors assert that in Homer's catalogue of the ships after the line:Ajax twelve ships from Salamis commands,Solon inserted one of his own:And fixed their station next the Athenian bands.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, dramas by\n, eumenides Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
aeschylus, dramas by\n, suppliant women Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
aeschylus, on theseus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
aeschylus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
aethra Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
agon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188, 587
aiantis tribe, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
alcibiades Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188
alexandros Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
allan, w. and kelly, a. Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 77
alope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
antiope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
archeology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
argos, and athens Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
aristophanes, knights Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 190
aristophanes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
athens, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
athens, and identity Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
athens, imperialism (athenian) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
athens Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 190
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
athens and athenians, in persian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
cadmus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
chorus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
choruses/choreuts, tragic Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
choruses/choreuts Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
community Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
creon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
creon (king of thebes) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
danaus, daughters of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
deception, opposed to hoplitism Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
delphi Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
democracy, athenian, thucydides depiction of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
democracy, in athens Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
democracy and monarchy, debate between theseus and theban herald on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
dionysia, city (great) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 190
dramatic festivals, attendance Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 77
dramatic festivals, discursive parameters Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 77, 194
dramatic festivals, judges Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 77
dramatic festivals, pre-play ceremonies Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 77
dramatic festivals, subversive nature of tragedy Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 77
egyptus, sons of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
epitaphioi logoi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
eteocles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
euripides, on theseus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
euripides, supplices Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
euripides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
euripides suppliant women, dating Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
euripides suppliant women, interpretation Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
exarchos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
general theseus, mythic image of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
goldhill, s. Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 77
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
heralds Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 938
herodotus, and the athenian audience Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
herodotus, historical perspective of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
imitation Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
impiety Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
men of eleusis, the (aeschylus) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
metalepsis, of theseus in suppliant women Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
mills, s. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
monarchy and democracy, debate between theseus and theban herald on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
morwood, j. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188, 190
myths, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
naples, bilingualism in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
nicias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188
oedipus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
oligarchs/oligarchy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
oracles, delphic Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
oracles, interpreted by athenians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
oratory Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
peirithous Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865
pelasgus, as a democratic king Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
peloponnese Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
peloponnesian war Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
pericles, on deceit Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
pericles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
persia and persians, war with greeks Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
plato Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
polynices Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
praise Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
priam Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
sansone, d. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
siluae, imperialism in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
socrates Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
sophism of theseus in suppliant women' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
sophocles, dramas by\n, antigone Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles, dramas by\n, trachiniae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
sophocles (tragic poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sparta, agoge Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
sparta, education system Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
sparta, krupteia Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
statius, and euripides Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
statius, and greek tragedy Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
statius, father of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
suppliant women, the (aeschylus) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 188, 190, 587, 865, 938
suppliant women metaleptic role of theseus in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
suppliant women theban herald, debate on democracy and monarchy between theseus and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 122
suppliants, the (euripides) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
theatre Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167
thebes, and athens Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 159
thebes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
theseus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 167; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 209
thucydides, and herodotus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
thucydides, funeral speech Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
thucydides, on persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
thucydides, on spartans Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
tragedy, choruses of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 865, 938
tyrants/ tyranny Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
xenophon, and spartan custom Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 34
xenophon, ps.-xenophon, ath. pol. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 210
xerxes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 311
yoon, f. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 938