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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5640
Euripides, Suppliant Women, 382


πόλει τε κἀμοί, διαφέρων κηρύγματα:(to a herald.) Forasmuch as with this thy art thou hast ever served the stat£ and me by carrying my proclamations far and wide, so now cross Asopus and the waters of Ismenus, and declare this message to the haughty king of the Cadmeans:


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.494, 2.557 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.494. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.557. /Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 266-329, 265 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

265. Ἐχίονος δʼ ὢν παῖς καταισχύνεις γένος; Τειρεσίας 265. Do you, the child of Echion, bring shame to your race? Teiresia
3. Euripides, Electra, 1025-1029, 1032, 1035, 1024 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Hecuba, 487 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

487. Ταλθύβιε, κεῖται ξυγκεκλῃμένη πέπλοις.
5. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 134-137, 139-178, 133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 141-164, 217-229, 236-237, 240-246, 266-267, 140 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Hippolytus, 58 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

58. Come follow, friends, singing to Artemis, daughter of Zeus, throned in the sky
8. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 144-145, 160-167, 214-266, 271-276, 282-303, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 340-369, 373-374, 377-381, 383-597, 339 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.20-2.23, 2.52-2.53, 2.57-2.65, 2.67-2.68, 2.71-2.77, 4.77, 4.89-4.101 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Aristotle, Rhetoric, 1.15 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Strabo, Geography, 9.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.1.10. At the present time the island is held by the Athenians, although in early times there was strife between them and the Megarians for its possession. Some say that it was Peisistratus, others Solon, who inserted in the Catalogue of Ships immediately after the verse, and Aias brought twelve ships from Salamis, the verse, and, bringing them, halted them where the battalions of the Athenians were stationed, and then used the poet as a witness that the island had belonged to the Athenians from the beginning. But the critics do not accept this interpretation, because many of the verses bear witness to the contrary. For why is Aias found in the last place in the ship-camp, not with the Athenians, but with the Thessalians under Protesilaus? Here were the ships of Aias and Protesilaus. And in the Visitation of the troops, Agamemnon found Menestheus the charioteer, son of Peteos, standing still; and about him were the Athenians, masters of the battle-cry. And near by stood Odysseus of many wiles, and about him, at his side, the ranks of the Cephallenians. And back again to Aias and the Salaminians, he came to the Aiantes, and near them, Idomeneus on the other side, not Menestheus. The Athenians, then, are reputed to have cited alleged testimony of this kind from Homer, and the Megarians to have replied with the following parody: Aias brought ships from Salamis, from Polichne, from Aegeirussa, from Nisaea, and from Tripodes; these four are Megarian places, and, of these, Tripodes is called Tripodiscium, near which the present marketplace of the Megarians is situated.
13. Plutarch, Solon, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.35.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.35.3. There are still the remains of a market-place, a temple of Ajax and his statue in ebony. Even at the present day the Athenians pay honors to Ajax himself and to Eurysaces, for there is an altar of Eurysaces also at Athens . In Salamis is shown a stone not far from the harbor, on which they say that Telamon sat when he gazed at the ship in which his children were sailing away to Aulis to take part in the joint expedition of the Greeks.
15. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.48 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.48. And lest it should be thought that he had acquired Salamis by force only and not of right, he opened certain graves and showed that the dead were buried with their faces to the east, as was the custom of burial among the Athenians; further, that the tombs themselves faced the east, and that the inscriptions graven upon them named the deceased by their demes, which is a style peculiar to Athens. Some authors assert that in Homer's catalogue of the ships after the line:Ajax twelve ships from Salamis commands,Solon inserted one of his own:And fixed their station next the Athenian bands.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
aiantis tribe, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
alexandros Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
alope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
antiope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
archeology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
athens, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 935
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 933, 935
chorus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
exarchos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 933
heralds Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 933, 934, 935
herodotus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 935
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 934
kovacs, d. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 934
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
priam Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
rhetoric' Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
socrates Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587, 933, 935
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 933
yoon, f. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 933, 934, 935