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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5640
Euripides, Suppliant Women, 381-451


τέχνην μὲν αἰεὶ τήνδ' ἔχων ὑπηρετεῖς(to a herald.) Forasmuch as with this thy art thou hast ever served the stat£ and me by carrying my proclamations far and wide, so now cross Asopus and the waters of Ismenus, and declare this message to the haughty king of the Cadmeans:


πόλει τε κἀμοί, διαφέρων κηρύγματα:(to a herald.) Forasmuch as with this thy art thou hast ever served the stat£ and me by carrying my proclamations far and wide, so now cross Asopus and the waters of Ismenus, and declare this message to the haughty king of the Cadmeans:


ἐλθὼν δ' ὑπέρ τ' ̓Ασωπὸν ̓Ισμηνοῦ θ' ὕδωρ(to a herald.) Forasmuch as with this thy art thou hast ever served the stat£ and me by carrying my proclamations far and wide, so now cross Asopus and the waters of Ismenus, and declare this message to the haughty king of the Cadmeans:


σεμνῷ τυράννῳ φράζε Καδμείων τάδε:(to a herald.) Forasmuch as with this thy art thou hast ever served the stat£ and me by carrying my proclamations far and wide, so now cross Asopus and the waters of Ismenus, and declare this message to the haughty king of the Cadmeans:


Θησεύς ς' ἀπαιτεῖ πρὸς χάριν θάψαι νεκρούςTheseus, thy neighbour, one who well may win the boon he craves, begs as a favour thy permission to bury the dead, winning to thyself thereby the love of all the Erechthidae. And if they will acquiesce, come back again, but if they hearken not, thy second message runneth thus


συγγείτον' οἰκῶν γαῖαν, ἀξιῶν τυχεῖνTheseus, thy neighbour, one who well may win the boon he craves, begs as a favour thy permission to bury the dead, winning to thyself thereby the love of all the Erechthidae. And if they will acquiesce, come back again, but if they hearken not, thy second message runneth thus


φίλον τε θέσθαι πάντ' ̓Ερεχθειδῶν λεών.Theseus, thy neighbour, one who well may win the boon he craves, begs as a favour thy permission to bury the dead, winning to thyself thereby the love of all the Erechthidae. And if they will acquiesce, come back again, but if they hearken not, thy second message runneth thus


κἂν μὲν θέλωσιν, αἰνέσας παλίσσυτοςTheseus, thy neighbour, one who well may win the boon he craves, begs as a favour thy permission to bury the dead, winning to thyself thereby the love of all the Erechthidae. And if they will acquiesce, come back again, but if they hearken not, thy second message runneth thus


στεῖχ': ἢν δ' ἀπιστῶς', οἵδε δεύτεροι λόγοι:Theseus, thy neighbour, one who well may win the boon he craves, begs as a favour thy permission to bury the dead, winning to thyself thereby the love of all the Erechthidae. And if they will acquiesce, come back again, but if they hearken not, thy second message runneth thus


Κῶμον δέχεσθαι τὸν ἐμὸν ἀσπιδηφόρον.they may expect my warrior host; for at the sacred fount of Callichorus my army camps in readiness and is being reviewed. Moreover, the city gladly of its own accord undertook this enterprise, when it perceived my wish.


στρατὸς δὲ θάσσει κἀξετάζεται παρὼνthey may expect my warrior host; for at the sacred fount of Callichorus my army camps in readiness and is being reviewed. Moreover, the city gladly of its own accord undertook this enterprise, when it perceived my wish.


Καλλίχορον ἀμφὶ σεμνὸν εὐτρεπὴς ὅδε.they may expect my warrior host; for at the sacred fount of Callichorus my army camps in readiness and is being reviewed. Moreover, the city gladly of its own accord undertook this enterprise, when it perceived my wish.


καὶ μὴν ἑκοῦσά γ' ἀσμένη τ' ἐδέξατοthey may expect my warrior host; for at the sacred fount of Callichorus my army camps in readiness and is being reviewed. Moreover, the city gladly of its own accord undertook this enterprise, when it perceived my wish.


πόλις πόνον τόνδ', ὡς θέλοντά μ' ᾔσθετο.they may expect my warrior host; for at the sacred fount of Callichorus my army camps in readiness and is being reviewed. Moreover, the city gladly of its own accord undertook this enterprise, when it perceived my wish.


ἔα: λόγων τίς ἐμποδὼν ὅδ' ἔρχεται;Ha! who comes hither to interrupt my speech? A Theban herald, so it seems, though I am not sure thereof. Stay; haply he may save thee thy trouble. For by his coming he meets my purpose half-way. Herald


Καδμεῖος, ὡς ἔοικεν οὐ σάφ' εἰδότιHa! who comes hither to interrupt my speech? A Theban herald, so it seems, though I am not sure thereof. Stay; haply he may save thee thy trouble. For by his coming he meets my purpose half-way. Herald


κῆρυξ. ἐπίσχες, ἤν ς' ἀπαλλάξῃ πόνουHa! who comes hither to interrupt my speech? A Theban herald, so it seems, though I am not sure thereof. Stay; haply he may save thee thy trouble. For by his coming he meets my purpose half-way. Herald


μολὼν ὕπαντα τοῖς ἐμοῖς βουλεύμασιν.Ha! who comes hither to interrupt my speech? A Theban herald, so it seems, though I am not sure thereof. Stay; haply he may save thee thy trouble. For by his coming he meets my purpose half-way. Herald


τίς γῆς τύραννος; πρὸς τίν' ἀγγεῖλαί με χρὴWho is the despot of this land? To whom must I announce


λόγους Κρέοντος, ὃς κρατεῖ Κάδμου χθονὸςthe message of Creon, who rules o’er the land of Cadmus, since Eteocles was slain by the hand of his brother Polynices, at the sevenfold gates of Thebes? Theseu


̓Ετεοκλέους θανόντος ἀμφ' ἑπταστόμουςthe message of Creon, who rules o’er the land of Cadmus, since Eteocles was slain by the hand of his brother Polynices, at the sevenfold gates of Thebes? Theseu


πύλας ἀδελφῇ χειρὶ Πολυνείκους ὕπο;the message of Creon, who rules o’er the land of Cadmus, since Eteocles was slain by the hand of his brother Polynices, at the sevenfold gates of Thebes? Theseu


πρῶτον μὲν ἤρξω τοῦ λόγου ψευδῶς, ξένεSir stranger, thou hast made a false beginning to thy speech, in seeking here a despot. For this city is not ruled


ζητῶν τύραννον ἐνθάδ': οὐ γὰρ ἄρχεταιSir stranger, thou hast made a false beginning to thy speech, in seeking here a despot. For this city is not ruled


ἑνὸς πρὸς ἀνδρός, ἀλλ' ἐλευθέρα πόλις.by one man, but is free. The people rule in succession year by year, allowing no preference to wealth, but the poor man shares equally with the rich. Herald


δῆμος δ' ἀνάσσει διαδοχαῖσιν ἐν μέρειby one man, but is free. The people rule in succession year by year, allowing no preference to wealth, but the poor man shares equally with the rich. Herald


ἐνιαυσίαισιν, οὐχὶ τῷ πλούτῳ διδοὺςby one man, but is free. The people rule in succession year by year, allowing no preference to wealth, but the poor man shares equally with the rich. Herald


τὸ πλεῖστον, ἀλλὰ χὡ πένης ἔχων ἴσον.by one man, but is free. The people rule in succession year by year, allowing no preference to wealth, but the poor man shares equally with the rich. Herald


ἓν μὲν τόδ' ἡμῖν ὥσπερ ἐν πεσσοῖς δίδωςThou givest me here an advantage, as it might be in a game of draughts Possibly referring to a habit of allowing the weaker player so many moves or points. ;


κρεῖσσον: πόλις γὰρ ἧς ἐγὼ πάρειμ' ἄποfor the city, whence I come, is ruled by one man only, not by the mob; none there puffs up the citizens with specious words, and for his own advantage twists them this way or that,—one moment dear to them and lavish of his favours


ἑνὸς πρὸς ἀνδρός, οὐκ ὄχλῳ κρατύνεται:for the city, whence I come, is ruled by one man only, not by the mob; none there puffs up the citizens with specious words, and for his own advantage twists them this way or that,—one moment dear to them and lavish of his favours


οὐδ' ἔστιν αὐτὴν ὅστις ἐκχαυνῶν λόγοιςfor the city, whence I come, is ruled by one man only, not by the mob; none there puffs up the citizens with specious words, and for his own advantage twists them this way or that,—one moment dear to them and lavish of his favours


πρὸς κέρδος ἴδιον ἄλλοτ' ἄλλοσε στρέφειfor the city, whence I come, is ruled by one man only, not by the mob; none there puffs up the citizens with specious words, and for his own advantage twists them this way or that,—one moment dear to them and lavish of his favours


τὸ δ' αὐτίχ' ἡδὺς καὶ διδοὺς πολλὴν χάρινfor the city, whence I come, is ruled by one man only, not by the mob; none there puffs up the citizens with specious words, and for his own advantage twists them this way or that,—one moment dear to them and lavish of his favours


ἐσαῦθις ἔβλαψ', εἶτα διαβολαῖς νέαιςthe next a bane to all; and yet by fresh calumnies of others he hides his former failures and escapes punishment. Besides, how shall the people, if it cannot form true judgments, be able rightly to direct the state? Nay, ’tis time, not haste, that affords a better


κλέψας τὰ πρόσθε σφάλματ' ἐξέδυ δίκης.the next a bane to all; and yet by fresh calumnies of others he hides his former failures and escapes punishment. Besides, how shall the people, if it cannot form true judgments, be able rightly to direct the state? Nay, ’tis time, not haste, that affords a better


ἄλλως τε πῶς ἂν μὴ διορθεύων λόγουςthe next a bane to all; and yet by fresh calumnies of others he hides his former failures and escapes punishment. Besides, how shall the people, if it cannot form true judgments, be able rightly to direct the state? Nay, ’tis time, not haste, that affords a better


ὀρθῶς δύναιτ' ἂν δῆμος εὐθύνειν πόλιν;the next a bane to all; and yet by fresh calumnies of others he hides his former failures and escapes punishment. Besides, how shall the people, if it cannot form true judgments, be able rightly to direct the state? Nay, ’tis time, not haste, that affords a better


ὁ γὰρ χρόνος μάθησιν ἀντὶ τοῦ τάχουςthe next a bane to all; and yet by fresh calumnies of others he hides his former failures and escapes punishment. Besides, how shall the people, if it cannot form true judgments, be able rightly to direct the state? Nay, ’tis time, not haste, that affords a better


κρείσσω δίδωσι. γαπόνος δ' ἀνὴρ πένηςunderstanding. A poor hind, granted he be not all unschooled, would still be unable from his toil to give his mind to politics. Verily Kirchhoff considers lines 423 to 425 spurious. the better sort count it no healthy sign when the worthless man obtains a reputation


εἰ καὶ γένοιτο μὴ ἀμαθής, ἔργων ὕποunderstanding. A poor hind, granted he be not all unschooled, would still be unable from his toil to give his mind to politics. Verily Kirchhoff considers lines 423 to 425 spurious. the better sort count it no healthy sign when the worthless man obtains a reputation


οὐκ ἂν δύναιτο πρὸς τὰ κοίν' ἀποβλέπειν.understanding. A poor hind, granted he be not all unschooled, would still be unable from his toil to give his mind to politics. Verily Kirchhoff considers lines 423 to 425 spurious. the better sort count it no healthy sign when the worthless man obtains a reputation


ἦ δὴ νοσῶδες τοῦτο τοῖς ἀμείνοσινunderstanding. A poor hind, granted he be not all unschooled, would still be unable from his toil to give his mind to politics. Verily Kirchhoff considers lines 423 to 425 spurious. the better sort count it no healthy sign when the worthless man obtains a reputation


ὅταν πονηρὸς ἀξίωμ' ἀνὴρ ἔχῃunderstanding. A poor hind, granted he be not all unschooled, would still be unable from his toil to give his mind to politics. Verily Kirchhoff considers lines 423 to 425 spurious. the better sort count it no healthy sign when the worthless man obtains a reputation


γλώσσῃ κατασχὼν δῆμον, οὐδὲν ὢν τὸ πρίν.by beguiling with words the populace, though aforetime he was naught. Theseu


κομψός γ' ὁ κῆρυξ καὶ παρεργάτης λόγων.This herald is a clever fellow, a dabbler in the art of talk. But since thou hast thus entered the lists with me, listen awhile, for ’twas thou didst challenge a discussion. Naught is more hostile to a city than a despot;


ἐπεὶ δ' ἀγῶνα καὶ σὺ τόνδ' ἠγωνίσωThis herald is a clever fellow, a dabbler in the art of talk. But since thou hast thus entered the lists with me, listen awhile, for ’twas thou didst challenge a discussion. Naught is more hostile to a city than a despot;


ἄκου': ἅμιλλαν γὰρ σὺ προύθηκας λόγων.This herald is a clever fellow, a dabbler in the art of talk. But since thou hast thus entered the lists with me, listen awhile, for ’twas thou didst challenge a discussion. Naught is more hostile to a city than a despot;


οὐδὲν τυράννου δυσμενέστερον πόλειThis herald is a clever fellow, a dabbler in the art of talk. But since thou hast thus entered the lists with me, listen awhile, for ’twas thou didst challenge a discussion. Naught is more hostile to a city than a despot;


ὅπου τὸ μὲν πρώτιστον οὐκ εἰσὶν νόμοιwhere he is, there are in the first place no laws common to all, but one man is tyrant, in whose keeping and in his alone the law resides, and in that case equality is at an end. But when the laws are written down, rich and poor alike have equal justice


κοινοί, κρατεῖ δ' εἷς τὸν νόμον κεκτημένοςwhere he is, there are in the first place no laws common to all, but one man is tyrant, in whose keeping and in his alone the law resides, and in that case equality is at an end. But when the laws are written down, rich and poor alike have equal justice


αὐτὸς παρ' αὑτῷ: καὶ τόδ' οὐκέτ' ἔστ' ἴσον.where he is, there are in the first place no laws common to all, but one man is tyrant, in whose keeping and in his alone the law resides, and in that case equality is at an end. But when the laws are written down, rich and poor alike have equal justice


γεγραμμένων δὲ τῶν νόμων ὅ τ' ἀσθενὴςwhere he is, there are in the first place no laws common to all, but one man is tyrant, in whose keeping and in his alone the law resides, and in that case equality is at an end. But when the laws are written down, rich and poor alike have equal justice


ὁ πλούσιός τε τὴν δίκην ἴσην ἔχειwhere he is, there are in the first place no laws common to all, but one man is tyrant, in whose keeping and in his alone the law resides, and in that case equality is at an end. But when the laws are written down, rich and poor alike have equal justice


ἔστιν δ' ἐνισπεῖν τοῖσιν ἀσθενεστέροιςand Nauck omits lines 435, 436, as they are not given by Stobaeus in quoting the passage. it is open to the weaker to use the same language to the prosperous when he is reviled by him, and the weaker prevails over the stronger if he have justice on his side. Freedom’s mark is also seen in this: Who A reference to the question put by the herald in the Athenian ἐκκλησία, Τίς ἀγορεύειν βούλεται ; It here serves as a marked characteristic of democracy. hath wholesome counsel to declare unto the state?


τὸν εὐτυχοῦντα ταὔθ', ὅταν κλύῃ κακῶςand Nauck omits lines 435, 436, as they are not given by Stobaeus in quoting the passage. it is open to the weaker to use the same language to the prosperous when he is reviled by him, and the weaker prevails over the stronger if he have justice on his side. Freedom’s mark is also seen in this: Who A reference to the question put by the herald in the Athenian ἐκκλησία, Τίς ἀγορεύειν βούλεται ; It here serves as a marked characteristic of democracy. hath wholesome counsel to declare unto the state?


νικᾷ δ' ὁ μείων τὸν μέγαν δίκαι' ἔχων.and Nauck omits lines 435, 436, as they are not given by Stobaeus in quoting the passage. it is open to the weaker to use the same language to the prosperous when he is reviled by him, and the weaker prevails over the stronger if he have justice on his side. Freedom’s mark is also seen in this: Who A reference to the question put by the herald in the Athenian ἐκκλησία, Τίς ἀγορεύειν βούλεται ; It here serves as a marked characteristic of democracy. hath wholesome counsel to declare unto the state?


τοὐλεύθερον δ' ἐκεῖνο: Τίς θέλει πόλειand Nauck omits lines 435, 436, as they are not given by Stobaeus in quoting the passage. it is open to the weaker to use the same language to the prosperous when he is reviled by him, and the weaker prevails over the stronger if he have justice on his side. Freedom’s mark is also seen in this: Who A reference to the question put by the herald in the Athenian ἐκκλησία, Τίς ἀγορεύειν βούλεται ; It here serves as a marked characteristic of democracy. hath wholesome counsel to declare unto the state?


χρηστόν τι βούλευμ' ἐς μέσον φέρειν ἔχων;and Nauck omits lines 435, 436, as they are not given by Stobaeus in quoting the passage. it is open to the weaker to use the same language to the prosperous when he is reviled by him, and the weaker prevails over the stronger if he have justice on his side. Freedom’s mark is also seen in this: Who A reference to the question put by the herald in the Athenian ἐκκλησία, Τίς ἀγορεύειν βούλεται ; It here serves as a marked characteristic of democracy. hath wholesome counsel to declare unto the state?


καὶ ταῦθ' ὁ χρῄζων λαμπρός ἐσθ', ὁ μὴ θέλωνAnd he who chooses to do so gains renown, while he, who hath no wish, remains silent. What greater equality can there be in a city?


σιγᾷ. τί τούτων ἔστ' ἰσαίτερον πόλει;And he who chooses to do so gains renown, while he, who hath no wish, remains silent. What greater equality can there be in a city?


καὶ μὴν ὅπου γε δῆμος αὐθέντης χθονόςAgain, where the people are absolute rulers of the land, they rejoice in having a reserve of youthful citizens, while a king counts The words ἐχθρὸν . . . ἀρίστους are regarded by Nauck as spurious. this a hostile element


ὑποῦσιν ἀστοῖς ἥδεται νεανίαις:Again, where the people are absolute rulers of the land, they rejoice in having a reserve of youthful citizens, while a king counts The words ἐχθρὸν . . . ἀρίστους are regarded by Nauck as spurious. this a hostile element


ἀνὴρ δὲ βασιλεὺς ἐχθρὸν ἡγεῖται τόδεAgain, where the people are absolute rulers of the land, they rejoice in having a reserve of youthful citizens, while a king counts The words ἐχθρὸν . . . ἀρίστους are regarded by Nauck as spurious. this a hostile element


καὶ τοὺς ἀρίστους οὕς τ' ἂν ἡγῆται φρονεῖνand strives to slay the leading men, all such as he deems discreet, for he feareth for his power. How then can a city remain stable, where one cuts short all i.e. τόλμας for which Prinz suggests κλῶνας . enterprise and mows down the young like meadow-flowers in spring-time?


κτείνει, δεδοικὼς τῆς τυραννίδος πέρι.and strives to slay the leading men, all such as he deems discreet, for he feareth for his power. How then can a city remain stable, where one cuts short all i.e. τόλμας for which Prinz suggests κλῶνας . enterprise and mows down the young like meadow-flowers in spring-time?


πῶς οὖν ἔτ' ἂν γένοιτ' ἂν ἰσχυρὰ πόλιςand strives to slay the leading men, all such as he deems discreet, for he feareth for his power. How then can a city remain stable, where one cuts short all i.e. τόλμας for which Prinz suggests κλῶνας . enterprise and mows down the young like meadow-flowers in spring-time?


ὅταν τις ὡς λειμῶνος ἠρινοῦ στάχυνand strives to slay the leading men, all such as he deems discreet, for he feareth for his power. How then can a city remain stable, where one cuts short all i.e. τόλμας for which Prinz suggests κλῶνας . enterprise and mows down the young like meadow-flowers in spring-time?


τόλμας ἀφαιρῇ κἀπολωτίζῃ νέους;and strives to slay the leading men, all such as he deems discreet, for he feareth for his power. How then can a city remain stable, where one cuts short all i.e. τόλμας for which Prinz suggests κλῶνας . enterprise and mows down the young like meadow-flowers in spring-time?


κτᾶσθαι δὲ πλοῦτον καὶ βίον τί δεῖ τέκνοιςWhat boots it to acquire wealth and livelihood for children, merely Kirchhoff rejects this line. to add to the tyrant’s substance by one’s toil? Why train up virgin daughters virtuously in our homes to gratify a tyrant’s whim, whenso he will, and cause tears to those who rear them? May my life end


ὡς τῷ τυράννῳ πλείον' ἐκμοχθῇ βίον;What boots it to acquire wealth and livelihood for children, merely Kirchhoff rejects this line. to add to the tyrant’s substance by one’s toil? Why train up virgin daughters virtuously in our homes to gratify a tyrant’s whim, whenso he will, and cause tears to those who rear them? May my life end


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.494, 2.557 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.494. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.557. /Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 266-329, 265 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

265. Ἐχίονος δʼ ὢν παῖς καταισχύνεις γένος; Τειρεσίας 265. Do you, the child of Echion, bring shame to your race? Teiresia
3. Euripides, Electra, 1025-1029, 1032, 1035, 1024 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Hecuba, 487 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

487. Ταλθύβιε, κεῖται ξυγκεκλῃμένη πέπλοις.
5. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 134-137, 139-178, 133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 141-164, 217-229, 236-237, 240-246, 266-267, 140 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Hippolytus, 58 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

58. Come follow, friends, singing to Artemis, daughter of Zeus, throned in the sky
8. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 144-145, 160-167, 214-266, 271-276, 282-303, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 340-369, 373-374, 377-380, 382-597, 339 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.20-2.23, 2.52-2.53, 2.57-2.65, 2.67-2.68, 2.71-2.77, 4.77, 4.89-4.101 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Aristotle, Rhetoric, 1.15 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Strabo, Geography, 9.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.1.10. At the present time the island is held by the Athenians, although in early times there was strife between them and the Megarians for its possession. Some say that it was Peisistratus, others Solon, who inserted in the Catalogue of Ships immediately after the verse, and Aias brought twelve ships from Salamis, the verse, and, bringing them, halted them where the battalions of the Athenians were stationed, and then used the poet as a witness that the island had belonged to the Athenians from the beginning. But the critics do not accept this interpretation, because many of the verses bear witness to the contrary. For why is Aias found in the last place in the ship-camp, not with the Athenians, but with the Thessalians under Protesilaus? Here were the ships of Aias and Protesilaus. And in the Visitation of the troops, Agamemnon found Menestheus the charioteer, son of Peteos, standing still; and about him were the Athenians, masters of the battle-cry. And near by stood Odysseus of many wiles, and about him, at his side, the ranks of the Cephallenians. And back again to Aias and the Salaminians, he came to the Aiantes, and near them, Idomeneus on the other side, not Menestheus. The Athenians, then, are reputed to have cited alleged testimony of this kind from Homer, and the Megarians to have replied with the following parody: Aias brought ships from Salamis, from Polichne, from Aegeirussa, from Nisaea, and from Tripodes; these four are Megarian places, and, of these, Tripodes is called Tripodiscium, near which the present marketplace of the Megarians is situated.
13. Plutarch, Solon, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.35.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.35.3. There are still the remains of a market-place, a temple of Ajax and his statue in ebony. Even at the present day the Athenians pay honors to Ajax himself and to Eurysaces, for there is an altar of Eurysaces also at Athens . In Salamis is shown a stone not far from the harbor, on which they say that Telamon sat when he gazed at the ship in which his children were sailing away to Aulis to take part in the joint expedition of the Greeks.
15. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.48 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.48. And lest it should be thought that he had acquired Salamis by force only and not of right, he opened certain graves and showed that the dead were buried with their faces to the east, as was the custom of burial among the Athenians; further, that the tombs themselves faced the east, and that the inscriptions graven upon them named the deceased by their demes, which is a style peculiar to Athens. Some authors assert that in Homer's catalogue of the ships after the line:Ajax twelve ships from Salamis commands,Solon inserted one of his own:And fixed their station next the Athenian bands.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
aiantis tribe, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
alexandros Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
alope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
antiope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
archeology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
athens, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 677
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 935
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 933, 935
chorus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
exarchos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 933
heralds Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 933, 934, 935
herodotus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 935
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 934
kovacs, d. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 934
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
priam Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
rhetoric' Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
socrates Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587, 933, 935
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 87
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 933
yoon, f. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 933, 934, 935