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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5640
Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1205-1232


ᾗ δ' ἂν διοίξῃς σφάγια καὶ τρώσῃς φόνονAnd bury the sharp-edged knife, wherewith thou shalt have laid the victims open and shed their blood, deep in the bowels of the earth, hard by the pyres where the seven chieftains burn; for its appearance shall strike them with dismay, if e’er against thy town they come, and shall cause them to return with sorrow.


ὀξύστομον μάχαιραν ἐς γαίας μυχοὺςAnd bury the sharp-edged knife, wherewith thou shalt have laid the victims open and shed their blood, deep in the bowels of the earth, hard by the pyres where the seven chieftains burn; for its appearance shall strike them with dismay, if e’er against thy town they come, and shall cause them to return with sorrow.


κρύψον παρ' αὐτὰς ἑπτὰ πυρκαιὰς νεκρῶν:And bury the sharp-edged knife, wherewith thou shalt have laid the victims open and shed their blood, deep in the bowels of the earth, hard by the pyres where the seven chieftains burn; for its appearance shall strike them with dismay, if e’er against thy town they come, and shall cause them to return with sorrow.


φόβον γὰρ αὐτοῖς, ἤν ποτ' ἔλθωσιν πόλινAnd bury the sharp-edged knife, wherewith thou shalt have laid the victims open and shed their blood, deep in the bowels of the earth, hard by the pyres where the seven chieftains burn; for its appearance shall strike them with dismay, if e’er against thy town they come, and shall cause them to return with sorrow.


δειχθεῖσα θήσει καὶ κακὸν νόστον πάλιν.And bury the sharp-edged knife, wherewith thou shalt have laid the victims open and shed their blood, deep in the bowels of the earth, hard by the pyres where the seven chieftains burn; for its appearance shall strike them with dismay, if e’er against thy town they come, and shall cause them to return with sorrow.


δράσας δὲ ταῦτα πέμπε γῆς ἔξω νεκρούς.When thou hast done all this, dismiss the dead from thy land. And to the god resign as sacred land the spot where their bodies were purified by fire, there by the meeting of the triple roads that lead unto the Isthmus. Thus much to thee, Theseus, I address; next to the sons of Argos I speak; when ye are grown to men’s estate, the town beside Ismenus shall ye sack


τεμένη δ', ἵν' αὐτῶν σώμαθ' ἡγνίσθη πυρίWhen thou hast done all this, dismiss the dead from thy land. And to the god resign as sacred land the spot where their bodies were purified by fire, there by the meeting of the triple roads that lead unto the Isthmus. Thus much to thee, Theseus, I address; next to the sons of Argos I speak; when ye are grown to men’s estate, the town beside Ismenus shall ye sack


μέθες παρ' αὐτὴν τρίοδον ̓Ισθμίας θεοῦ:When thou hast done all this, dismiss the dead from thy land. And to the god resign as sacred land the spot where their bodies were purified by fire, there by the meeting of the triple roads that lead unto the Isthmus. Thus much to thee, Theseus, I address; next to the sons of Argos I speak; when ye are grown to men’s estate, the town beside Ismenus shall ye sack


σοὶ μὲν τάδ' εἶπον: παισὶ δ' ̓Αργείων λέγω:When thou hast done all this, dismiss the dead from thy land. And to the god resign as sacred land the spot where their bodies were purified by fire, there by the meeting of the triple roads that lead unto the Isthmus. Thus much to thee, Theseus, I address; next to the sons of Argos I speak; when ye are grown to men’s estate, the town beside Ismenus shall ye sack


πορθήσεθ' ἡβήσαντες ̓Ισμηνοῦ πόλινWhen thou hast done all this, dismiss the dead from thy land. And to the god resign as sacred land the spot where their bodies were purified by fire, there by the meeting of the triple roads that lead unto the Isthmus. Thus much to thee, Theseus, I address; next to the sons of Argos I speak; when ye are grown to men’s estate, the town beside Ismenus shall ye sack


πατέρων θανόντων ἐκδικάζοντες φόνονavenging the slaughter of your dead sires; thou too, Aegialeus, shalt take thy father’s place and in thy youth command the host, and with thee Tydeus’ son marching from Aetolia,—him whom his father named Diomedes. Soon as the beards your cheeks o’ershadow


σύ τ' ἀντὶ πατρός, Αἰγιαλεῦ, στρατηλάτηςavenging the slaughter of your dead sires; thou too, Aegialeus, shalt take thy father’s place and in thy youth command the host, and with thee Tydeus’ son marching from Aetolia,—him whom his father named Diomedes. Soon as the beards your cheeks o’ershadow


νέος καταστάς, παῖς τ' ἀπ' Αἰτωλῶν μολὼνavenging the slaughter of your dead sires; thou too, Aegialeus, shalt take thy father’s place and in thy youth command the host, and with thee Tydeus’ son marching from Aetolia,—him whom his father named Diomedes. Soon as the beards your cheeks o’ershadow


Τυδέως, ὃν ὠνόμαζε Διομήδην πατήρ.avenging the slaughter of your dead sires; thou too, Aegialeus, shalt take thy father’s place and in thy youth command the host, and with thee Tydeus’ son marching from Aetolia,—him whom his father named Diomedes. Soon as the beards your cheeks o’ershadow


ἀλλ' οὐ φθάνειν χρὴ συσκιάζοντας γένυνavenging the slaughter of your dead sires; thou too, Aegialeus, shalt take thy father’s place and in thy youth command the host, and with thee Tydeus’ son marching from Aetolia,—him whom his father named Diomedes. Soon as the beards your cheeks o’ershadow


καὶ χαλκοπληθῆ Δαναϊδῶν ὁρμᾶν στρατὸνmust ye lead an armed Danaid host against the battlements of Thebes with sevenfold gates. For to their sorrow shall ye come like lion’s whelps in full-grown might to sack their city. No otherwise is it to be;


ἑπτάστολον πύργωμα Καδμείων ἔπι:must ye lead an armed Danaid host against the battlements of Thebes with sevenfold gates. For to their sorrow shall ye come like lion’s whelps in full-grown might to sack their city. No otherwise is it to be;


πικροὶ γὰρ αὐτοῖς ἥξετ', ἐκτεθραμμένοιmust ye lead an armed Danaid host against the battlements of Thebes with sevenfold gates. For to their sorrow shall ye come like lion’s whelps in full-grown might to sack their city. No otherwise is it to be;


σκύμνοι λεόντων, πόλεος ἐκπορθήτορες.must ye lead an armed Danaid host against the battlements of Thebes with sevenfold gates. For to their sorrow shall ye come like lion’s whelps in full-grown might to sack their city. No otherwise is it to be;


κοὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλως: ̓́Εκγονοι δ' ἀν' ̔Ελλάδαmust ye lead an armed Danaid host against the battlements of Thebes with sevenfold gates. For to their sorrow shall ye come like lion’s whelps in full-grown might to sack their city. No otherwise is it to be;


κληθέντες ᾠδὰς ὑστέροισι θήσετε:and ye shall be a theme for minstrels’ songs in days to come, known through Hellas as the After-born so famous shall your expedition be, thanks to Heaven. Theseu


τοῖον στράτευμα σὺν θεῷ πορεύσετε.and ye shall be a theme for minstrels’ songs in days to come, known through Hellas as the After-born so famous shall your expedition be, thanks to Heaven. Theseu


δέσποιν' ̓Αθάνα, πείσομαι λόγοισι σοῖς:Queen Athena, I will hearken to thy bidding; for thou it is dost set me up, so that I go not astray. And I will bind this monarch by an oath; do thou but guide my


σὺ γάρ μ' ἀνορθοῖς, ὥστε μὴ 'ξαμαρτάνειν:Queen Athena, I will hearken to thy bidding; for thou it is dost set me up, so that I go not astray. And I will bind this monarch by an oath; do thou but guide my


καὶ τόνδ' ἐν ὅρκοις ζεύξομαι: μόνον σύ μεQueen Athena, I will hearken to thy bidding; for thou it is dost set me up, so that I go not astray. And I will bind this monarch by an oath; do thou but guide my


ἐς ὀρθὸν ἵστη: σοῦ γὰρ εὐμενοῦς πόλειteps aright. For if thou art friendly to our state, we shall henceforth live secure. Choru


οὔσης τὸ λοιπὸν ἀσφαλῶς οἰκήσομεν.teps aright. For if thou art friendly to our state, we shall henceforth live secure. Choru
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 43-49, 42 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

42. ἄνδρες γὰρ ἑπτά, θούριοι λοχαγέται
2. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 186-195, 185 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

185. θὲς ἐς τὸ πρόσθεν ὑπτίαν τὴν ἀσπίδα
3. Euripides, Electra, 1255-1291, 1254 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1254. ἐλθὼν δ' ̓Αθήνας Παλλάδος σεμνὸν βρέτας
4. Euripides, Hecuba, 736-753, 345 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

345. θάρσει: πέφευγας τὸν ἐμὸν ̔Ικέσιον Δία: 345. Take heart; you are safe from the suppliant’s god in my case, for I will follow you, both because I must and because it is my wish to die; for if I were unwilling, a coward would I show myself, a woman faint of heart. Why should I prolong my days? I whose father was lord
5. Euripides, Helen, 1644-1679, 1643 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1643. Θεοκλύμενε, γαίας τῆσδ' ἄναξ: δισσοὶ δέ σε
6. Euripides, Ion, 1570-1594, 1569 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Medea, 440, 731-758, 439 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

439. Gone is the grace that oaths once had. Through all the breadth
8. Euripides, Orestes, 1626-1665, 1625 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1625. Appearing in the clouds. Menelaus, calm your anger that has been whetted; I am Phoebus, the son of Leto, drawing near to call you by name. And you also, Orestes, who are keeping guard on the girl, sword in hand, so that you may hear what I have come to say. Helen, whom all your eagerne
9. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1184-1204, 1206-1232, 133, 163-164, 188-189, 220-221, 286-364, 526-527, 538, 561-563, 671-672, 714-717, 1183 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1183. Hearken, Theseus, to the words that I Athena utter, telling thee thy duty, which, if thou perform it, will serve thy city.
10. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1045, 1044 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 2.2.8-2.2.9 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.2.8. But Clearchus put himself at the head of the rest of the troops, following out the plan of his previous orders, and they followed; and they reached the first stopping-place, See Xen. Anab. 2.1.3 . and there joined Ariaeus and his army, at about midnight. Then, while they halted under arms in line of battle, the generals and captains had a meeting with Ariaeus; and the two parties—the Greek officers, and Ariaeus together with the highest in rank of his followers—made oath that they would not betray each other and that they would be allies, while the barbarians took an additional pledge to lead the way without treachery. 2.2.9. These oaths they sealed by sacrificing a bull, a boar, and a ram over a shield, the Greeks dipping a sword in the blood and the barbarians a lance.
12. Plutarch, Aristides, 25.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absent from comedy and informal, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
achaeans Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
achaeus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
acropolis, athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
adrastus, king of argos Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
aetiology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
alliance with argos (tragedy) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
alliance with athens (tragedy) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
arcadia Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
areopagus, athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
argive alliance Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 125
argos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
athena Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 213
athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
athens and argos (in tragedy) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
audience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
blood Stavrianopoulou, Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World (2006) 196
blood rituals surrounding oaths, as analogy for wine Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
bulls as oath sacrifices Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
charis Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 125
clytemnestra Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
contract, conditional self-curse of oath Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 125
cult Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
curses Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
delphi Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
dorian Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
dorus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
eleusis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
engages with aeschylean corpus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 151
enyo Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, epilogue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
erechtheum Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
erechtheus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
erechtheïds / hyacinthids Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
friendship, distrust indicated by oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
friendship, established by oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
helen Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
hermione Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
ionia Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
irony Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
knives in oath rituals Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60, 151
law and literature Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 375
lifeworld, lifeworld experience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
magic, sympathetic Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 151
menelaus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
neoptolemus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
oath-rituals, description Stavrianopoulou, Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World (2006) 196
oaths Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
orestes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
orestheion Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
peitho, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
perjury, punishments for, death Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 151
phobos, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
plot, oath as plot feature Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 125
polynices Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 213
poseidon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
prophecy, foretelling the future Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
pylades Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
ritual authority Stavrianopoulou, Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World (2006) 196
sacrifice, oath sacrifice Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 125
sacrificial animals, species, sheep Stavrianopoulou, Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World (2006) 196
sacrificial victim Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 125
sheep as oath sacrifices Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60, 151
shields within oath rituals Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
supplication Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
theatre' Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 213
thebes Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 151
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
theseus, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
theseus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
tragedy, and law Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 375
tripods Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
trojan war Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 151
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
truce oaths, in euripides Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 151
truce oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
venerable ones Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
wine and oaths, as analogy for blood Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60
zeus, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 60