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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5638
Euripides, Rhesus, 780-789


καί μοι καθ' ὕπνον δόξα τις παρίσταται:I said no more but turned and presently


ἵππους γὰρ ἃς ἔθρεψα κἀδιφρηλάτουνI seemed to see the horses—mine own team


̔Ρήσῳ παρεστώς, εἶδον, ὡς ὄναρ δοκῶνI had trained long since and drove at Rhesus’ side—


λύκους ἐπεμβεβῶτας ἑδραίαν ῥάχιν:But wolves were on their backs, wolves, couched astride


θείνοντε δ' οὐρᾷ πωλικῆς ῥινοῦ τρίχαWho drove and scourged; I saw the horses rear


ἤλαυνον, αἳ δ' ἔρρεγκον ἐξ ἀντηρίδωνAnd stagger with wide nostrils, stiff with fear


θυμὸν πνέουσαι κἀνεχαίτιζον φόβῳ.And, starting up to drive the beasts away


ἐγὼ δ' ἀμύνων θῆρας ἐξεγείρομαιI woke.—A terror of great darkness lay


πώλοισιν: ἔννυχος γὰρ ἐξώρμα φόβος.About me, but I lifted up my head


κλύω δ' ἐπάρας κρᾶτα μυχθισμὸν νεκρῶν.And listened. There was moaning, like the dead


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

36 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 10.252-10.253, 10.496, 11.1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

10.252. /this thou sayest among the Argives that themselves know all. Nay, let us go, for verily the night is waning and dawn draweth near; lo, the stars have moved onward, and of the night more than two watches have past, and the third alone is left us. 10.253. /this thou sayest among the Argives that themselves know all. Nay, let us go, for verily the night is waning and dawn draweth near; lo, the stars have moved onward, and of the night more than two watches have past, and the third alone is left us. 10.496. /him the thirteenth he robbed of honey-sweet life, as he breathed hard, for like to an evil dream there stood above his head that night the son of Oeneus' son, by the devise of Athene. Meanwhile steadfast Odysseus loosed the single-hooved horses and bound them together with the reins, and drave them forth from the throng 11.1. /Now Dawn rose from her couch from beside lordly Tithonus, to bring light to immortals and to mortal men; and Zeus sent forth Strife unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, dread Strife, bearing in her hands a portent of war.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 19.515-19.533, 19.535-19.553, 19.559-19.569 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1073-1223, 274-275, 420-428, 891-894, 975, 1072 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1072. ὀτοτοτοῖ πόποι δᾶ. 1072. Otototoi, Gods, Earth, —
4. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 33-43, 523-552, 32 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

32. τορὸς δὲ Φοῖβος ὀρθόθριξ 32. For with a hair-raising shriek, Terror, the diviner of dreams for our house, breathing wrath out of sleep, uttered a cry of terror in the dead of night from the heart of the palace
5. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 101-104, 254-275, 94-100 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. παθοῦσα δʼ οὕτω δεινὰ πρὸς τῶν φιλτάτων 100. And yet, although I have suffered cruelly in this way from my nearest kin, no divine power is angry on my behalf, slaughtered as I have been by the hands of a matricide. See these gashes in my heart, and from where they came! For the sleeping mind has clear vision
6. Aeschylus, Persians, 177-200, 205, 176 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

176. πολλοῖς μὲν αἰεὶ νυκτέροις ὀνείρασιν 176. I have been haunted by a multitude of dreams at night since the time when my son, having despatched his army, departed with intent to lay waste the land of the Ionians. But never yet have I beheld so distinct a vision
7. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 646-673, 645 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

645. αἰεὶ γὰρ ὄψεις ἔννυχοι πωλεύμεναι 645. For visions of the night, always haunting my maiden chamber, sought to beguile me with seductive words, saying: q type=
8. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 885-895, 884 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

884. ὁλκὴ γὰρ οὔτοι πλόκαμον οὐδάμʼ ἅζεται. Χορός
9. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 205-240, 280-327, 204 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

204. τῇδε πᾶς ἕπου δίωκε καὶ τὸν ἄνδρα πυνθάνου
10. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 654-657, 653 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

653. ὡς γὰρ τάχιστ' ἀφικόμεθα πρὸς τὸν θεὸν
11. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1332-1344, 1346-1351, 1331 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1331. ὦ νυκτὸς κελαινοφαὴς
12. Aristophanes, Wasps, 11-12, 121-123, 13-53, 8-10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. τὸν αὐτὸν ἄρ' ἐμοὶ βουκολεῖς Σαβάζιον.
13. Euripides, Alcestis, 355-357, 354 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 816-873, 815 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

815. —Ha! see there, my old comrades! is the same wild panic fallen on us all; what phantom is this I see hovering over the house?
15. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 349-350, 42-56, 569, 57, 570-575, 58-60, 348 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Euripides, Rhesus, 101-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-152, 158-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-183, 19, 191, 2, 20, 205, 208-209, 21-22, 227, 23-28, 284-289, 29, 290-291, 294-295, 30, 301, 31, 310, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-399, 4, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-499, 5, 500-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-599, 6, 600-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-681, 683-689, 69, 690-691, 697, 70, 707, 709, 71-72, 720, 727, 73, 736-737, 74-75, 762-769, 773-774, 78, 781-789, 792-793, 802-803, 809, 81, 816, 824, 833-839, 84, 840-855, 87-90, 906-909, 91, 910-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-982, 985, 99-100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. I mean to lame them in their climbing, I
17. Herodotus, Histories, 1.120, 6.117, 7.17-7.18 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.120. Thus Astyages punished Harpagus. But, to help him to decide about Cyrus, he summoned the same Magi who had interpreted his dream as I have said: and when they came, Astyages asked them how they had interpreted his dream. They answered as before, and said that the boy must have been made king had he lived and not died first. ,Then Astyages said, “The boy is safe and alive, and when he was living in the country the boys of his village made him king, and he duly did all that is done by true kings: for he assigned to each individually the roles of bodyguards and sentinels and messengers and everything else, and so ruled. And what do you think is the significance of this?” ,“If the boy is alive,” said the Magi, “and has been made king without premeditation, then be confident on this score and keep an untroubled heart: he will not be made king a second time. Even in our prophecies, it is often but a small thing that has been foretold and the consequences of dreams come to nothing in the end.” ,“I too, Magi,” said Astyages, “am very much of your opinion: that the dream came true when the boy was called king, and that I have no more to fear from him. Nevertheless consider well and advise me what will be safest both for my house and for you.” ,The Magi said, “O King, we too are very anxious that your sovereignty prosper: for otherwise, it passes from your nation to this boy who is a Persian, and so we Medes are enslaved and held of no account by the Persians, as we are of another blood, but while you, our countryman, are established king, we have our share of power, and great honor is shown us by you. ,Thus, then, we ought by all means to watch out for you and for your sovereignty. And if at the present time we saw any danger we would declare everything to you: but now the dream has had a trifling conclusion, and we ourselves are confident and advise you to be so also. As for this boy, send him out of your sight to the Persians and to his parents.” 6.117. In the battle at Marathon about six thousand four hundred men of the foreigners were killed, and one hundred and ninety-two Athenians; that many fell on each side. ,The following marvel happened there: an Athenian, Epizelus son of Couphagoras, was fighting as a brave man in the battle when he was deprived of his sight, though struck or hit nowhere on his body, and from that time on he spent the rest of his life in blindness. ,I have heard that he tells this story about his misfortune: he saw opposing him a tall armed man, whose beard overshadowed his shield, but the phantom passed him by and killed the man next to him. I learned by inquiry that this is the story Epizelus tells. 7.17. So spoke Artabanus and did as he was bid, hoping to prove Xerxes' words vain; he put on Xerxes' robes and sat on the king's throne. Then while he slept there came to him in his sleep the same dream that had haunted Xerxes; it stood over him and spoke thus: ,“Are you the one who dissuades Xerxes from marching against Hellas, because you care for him? Neither in the future nor now will you escape with impunity for striving to turn aside what must be. To Xerxes himself it has been declared what will befall him if he disobeys.” 7.18. With this threat (so it seemed to Artabanus) the vision was about to burn his eyes with hot irons. He leapt up with a loud cry, then sat by Xerxes and told him the whole story of what he had seen in his dream, and next he said: ,“O King, since I have seen, as much as a man may, how the greater has often been brought low by the lesser, I forbade you to always give rein to your youthful spirit, knowing how evil a thing it is to have many desires, and remembering the end of Cyrus' expedition against the Massagetae and of Cambyses' against the Ethiopians, and I myself marched with Darius against the Scythians. ,Knowing this, I judged that you had only to remain in peace for all men to deem you fortunate. But since there is some divine motivation, and it seems that the gods mark Hellas for destruction, I myself change and correct my judgment. Now declare the gods' message to the Persians, and bid them obey your first command for all due preparation. Do this, so that nothing on your part be lacking to the fulfillment of the gods' commission.” ,After this was said, they were incited by the vision, and when daylight came Xerxes imparted all this to the Persians. Artabanus now openly encouraged that course which he alone had before openly discouraged.
18. Hippocrates, The Sacred Disease, 15 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19. Sophocles, Ajax, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-133, 14-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-86, 866-869, 87, 870-878, 88-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

20. Sophocles, Electra, 411, 417-425, 431-437, 449-452, 459, 472-501, 6-7, 410 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 981-983, 980 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

22. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 4.3.8 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.3.8. That day and night, accordingly, they remained there, in great perplexity. But Xenophon had a dream; he thought that he was bound in fetters, but that the fetters fell off from him of their own accord, so that he was released and could take as long steps διαβαίνειν, which also means to cross a river (see above). Here lay the good omen of the dream. as he pleased. When dawn came, he went to Cheirisophus, told him he had hopes that all would be well, and related to him his dream.
23. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

24. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.616-3.635 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.616. κούρην δʼ ἐξ ἀχέων ἀδινὸς κατελώφεεν ὕπνος 3.617. λέκτρῳ ἀνακλινθεῖσαν. ἄφαρ δέ μιν ἠπεροπῆες 3.618. οἷά τʼ ἀκηχεμένην, ὀλοοὶ ἐρέθεσκον ὄνειροι. 3.619. τὸν ξεῖνον δʼ ἐδόκησεν ὑφεστάμεναι τὸν ἄεθλον 3.620. οὔτι μάλʼ ὁρμαίνοντα δέρος κριοῖο κομίσσαι 3.621. οὐδέ τι τοῖο ἕκητι μετὰ πτόλιν Αἰήταο 3.622. ἐλθέμεν, ὄφρα δέ μιν σφέτερον δόμον εἰσαγάγοιτο 3.623. κουριδίην παράκοιτιν· ὀίετο δʼ ἀμφὶ βόεσσιν 3.624. αὐτὴ ἀεθλεύουσα μάλʼ εὐμαρέως πονέεσθαι· 3.625. σφωιτέρους δὲ τοκῆας ὑποσχεσίης ἀθερίζειν 3.626. οὕνεκεν οὐ κούρῃ ζεῦξαι βόας, ἀλλά οἱ αὐτῷ 3.627. προύθεσαν· ἐκ δʼ ἄρα τοῦ νεῖκος πέλεν ἀμφήριστον 3.628. πατρί τε καὶ ξείνοις· αὐτῇ δʼ ἐπιέτρεπον ἄμφω 3.629. τὼς ἔμεν, ὥς κεν ἑῇσι μετὰ φρεσὶν ἰθύσειεν. 3.630. ἡ δʼ ἄφνω τὸν ξεῖνον, ἀφειδήσασα τοκήων 3.631. εἵλετο· τοὺς δʼ ἀμέγαρτον ἄχος λάβεν, ἐκ δʼ ἐβόησαν 3.632. χωόμενοι· τὴν δʼ ὕπνος ἅμα κλαγγῇ μεθέηκεν. 3.633. παλλομένη δʼ ἀνόρουσε φόβῳ, περί τʼ ἀμφί τε τοίχους 3.634. πάπτηνεν θαλάμοιο· μόλις δʼ ἐσαγείρατο θυμὸν 3.635. ὡς πάρος ἐν στέρνοις, ἀδινὴν δʼ ἀνενείκατο φωνήν·
25. Cicero, On Divination, 1.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.23. Quid? quaeris, Carneades, cur haec ita fiant aut qua arte perspici possint? Nescire me fateor, evenire autem te ipsum dico videre. Casu, inquis. Itane vero? quicquam potest casu esse factum, quod omnes habet in se numeros veritatis? Quattuor tali iacti casu Venerium efficiunt; num etiam centum Venerios, si quadringentos talos ieceris, casu futuros putas? Aspersa temere pigmenta in tabula oris liniamenta efficere possunt; num etiam Veneris Coae pulchritudinem effici posse aspersione fortuita putas? Sus rostro si humi A litteram inpresserit, num propterea suspicari poteris Andromacham Ennii ab ea posse describi? Fingebat Carneades in Chiorum lapicidinis saxo diffisso caput extitisse Panisci; credo, aliquam non dissimilem figuram, sed certe non talem, ut eam factam a Scopa diceres. Sic enim se profecto res habet, ut numquam perfecte veritatem casus imitetur. 1.23. But what? You ask, Carneades, do you, why these things so happen, or by what rules they may be understood? I confess that I do not know, but that they do so fall out I assert that you yourself see. Mere accidents, you say. Now, really, is that so? Can anything be an accident which bears upon itself every mark of truth? Four dice are cast and a Venus throw results — that is chance; but do you think it would be chance, too, if in one hundred casts you made one hundred Venus throws? It is possible for paints flung at random on a canvasc to form the outlines of a face; but do you imagine that an accidental scattering of pigments could produce the beautiful portrait of Venus of Cos? Suppose that a hog should form the letter A on the ground with its snout; is that a reason for believing that it would write out Enniuss poem The Andromache?Carneades used to have a story that once in the Chian quarries when a stone was split open there appeared the head of the infant god Pan; I grant that the figure may have borne some resemblance to the god, but assuredly the resemblance was not such that you could ascribe the work to a Scopas. For it is undeniably true that no perfect imitation of a thing was ever made by chance. [14]
26. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 18, 17 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

27. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 20.12.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

20.12.2.  Disturbed by this vision and divining that some great misfortune would ensue, since he had already on an earlier occasion beheld a similar vision in a dream and some dire disaster had followed, he wished to hold back that day, but was not strong enough to defeat fate; for his friends opposed the delay and demanded that he should not let the favourable opportunity slip from his grasp.
28. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.415-7.466 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.415. the womb of Hecuba with burning brand 7.416. and brought forth nuptial fires; but Venus, too 7.417. uch offspring bore, a second Paris, who 7.419. So saying, with aspect terrible she sped 7.420. earthward her way; and called from gloom of hell 7.421. Alecto, woeful power, from cloudy throne 7.422. among the Furies, where her heart is fed 7.423. with horrid wars, wrath, vengeance, treason foul 7.424. and fatal feuds. Her father Pluto loathes 7.425. the creature he engendered, and with hate 7.426. her hell-born sister-fiends the monster view. 7.427. A host of shapes she wears, and many a front 7.428. of frowning black brows viper-garlanded. 7.429. Juno to her this goading speech addressed: 7.430. “O daughter of dark Night, arouse for me 7.431. thy wonted powers and our task begin! 7.432. Lest now my glory fail, my royal name 7.433. be vanquished, while Aeneas and his crew 7.434. cheat with a wedlock bond the Latin King 7.435. and seize Italia 's fields. Thou canst thrust on 7.436. two Ioving brothers to draw sword and slay 7.437. and ruin homes with hatred, calling in 7.438. the scourge of Furies and avenging fires. 7.439. A thousand names thou bearest, and thy ways 7.440. of ruin multiply a thousand-fold. 7.441. Arouse thy fertile breast! Go, rend in twain 7.442. this plighted peace! Breed calumnies and sow 7.443. causes of battle, till yon warrior hosts 7.445. Straightway Alecto, through whose body flows 7.446. the Gorgon poison, took her viewless way 7.447. to Latium and the lofty walls and towers 7.448. of the Laurentian King. Crouching she sate 7.449. in silence on the threshold of the bower 7.450. where Queen Amata in her fevered soul 7.451. pondered, with all a woman's wrath and fear 7.452. upon the Trojans and the marriage-suit 7.453. of Turnus. From her Stygian hair the fiend 7.454. a single serpent flung, which stole its way 7.455. to the Queen's very heart, that, frenzy-driven 7.456. he might on her whole house confusion pour. 7.457. Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound 7.458. unfelt, unseen, and in her wrathful mind 7.459. instilled its viper soul. Like golden chain 7.460. around her neck it twined, or stretched along 7.461. the fillets on her brow, or with her hair 7.462. enwrithing coiled; then on from limb to limb 7.463. lipped tortuous. Yet though the venom strong 7.464. thrilled with its first infection every vein 7.465. and touched her bones with fire, she knew it not 7.466. nor yielded all her soul, but made her plea
29. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 1.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

30. New Testament, Acts, 9.12, 10.7, 10.17-10.20, 11.17, 15.8-15.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.12. and in a vision he has seen a man named Aias coming in, and laying his hands on him, that he might receive his sight. 10.7. When the angel who spoke to him had departed, Cornelius called two of his household servants and a devout soldier of those who waited on him continually. 10.17. Now while Peter was very perplexed in himself what the vision which he had seen might mean, behold, the men who were sent by Cornelius, having made inquiry for Simon's house, stood before the gate 10.18. and called and asked whether Simon, who was surnamed Peter, was lodging there. 10.19. While Peter thought about the vision, the Spirit said to him, "Behold, three men seek you. 10.20. But arise, get down, and go with them, doubting nothing; for I have sent them. 11.17. If then God gave to them the same gift as us, when we believed in the Lord Jesus Christ, who was I, that I could withstand God? 15.8. God, who knows the heart, testified about them, giving them the Holy Spirit, just like he did to us. 15.9. He made no distinction between us and them, cleansing their hearts by faith.
31. New Testament, Matthew, 27.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

27.19. While he was sitting on the judgment seat, his wife sent to him, saying, "Have nothing to do with that righteous man, for I have suffered many things this day in a dream because of him.
32. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 63.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

33. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 1.6.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

34. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 48.7, 48.32 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

35. Chariton, Chaereas And Callirhoe, 3.7.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

36. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 1.18-1.19, 2.16 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actors/acting, deuteragonistos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
actors/acting, protagonistos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
actors/acting, tritagonistos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
aeschylus, and pseudo-euripides rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75, 77, 80
aeschylus, prometheus bound Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 77
agon logon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 74
anxiety dreams and nightmares, greek tragedy Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 385
anxiety dreams and nightmares Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174, 383, 385
characters, tragic/mythical, achilles Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 74
characters, tragic/mythical, aeneas Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
characters, tragic/mythical, ajax, salaminian (telamonian) Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 74
characters, tragic/mythical, aphrodite Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68, 77
characters, tragic/mythical, diomedes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, dolon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, furies (erinyes) Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
characters, tragic/mythical, hector Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, iris Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 77
characters, tragic/mythical, lyssa Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 77
characters, tragic/mythical, muse Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 77
characters, tragic/mythical, odysseus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75, 77
characters, tragic/mythical, paris-alexandros Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 77
characters, tragic/mythical, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75, 77, 80
chorostatas (kho-), in postclassical tragic plays/performances Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75, 80
cleon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
delphi Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128
dodona Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128
dramaturgy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128
dream, passim, esp., anticipatory function of sign dream Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128
dream, passim, esp., anxiety dream Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
dream, passim, esp., epiphany dream Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
dream, passim, esp., sign dream (= episode dream) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128, 131
dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 385
dreams and visions, deixis Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 176
dreams and visions, examples, tragedy Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 383, 385
dreams and visions, prescient Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 176
dreams and visions, repeated internal features Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 176
dreams and visions, theorematic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 176
epiparodos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
euripides, and the rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
euripides, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75, 77, 80
fiction, hellenistic and roman Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174
gender, female Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
gender, male Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128, 131
gender Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128, 131
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
homer Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
homeric hymns Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
inachus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128
incubation Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
irony Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 176
lifeworld, lifeworld experience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128
natural dreaming, in literary settings Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174
natural dreaming Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174
old comedy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128, 131
oracle (divine message) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128
parody Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
philosophy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128
playwrights, comedy (greek), aristophanes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
playwrights, tragedy (fifth century), euphorion, son of aeschylus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 77
plot Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
prometheus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128
prophecy' Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174
prophecy, foretelling the future Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128
reliance on passages from earlier drama, sources Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
reliance on passages from earlier drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
rhesus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128, 131
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, and thrace/thracian cult/lore Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, cletic hymn, in Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, dramaturgy and stagecraft Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75, 77
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, language and style Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, metre and diction Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, number of speaking roles Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 77
ritual Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
royalty Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
sabazius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
satyr drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75, 80
sophocles, and the rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68, 75, 80
sphacteria, battle of Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 131
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 128, 131