Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5638
Euripides, Rhesus, 596-674


χωρεῖτε, λύπῃ καρδίαν δεδηγμένοιDesponding and with sorrow-wounded heart


εἰ μὴ κτανεῖν σφῷν ̔́Εκτορ' ἢ Πάριν θεὸςIf Hector be not granted you to slay


δίδωσιν; ἄνδρα δ' οὐ πέπυσθε σύμμαχονNor Paris? Little know ye what great stay


Τροίᾳ μολόντα ̔Ρῆσον οὐ φαύλῳ τρόπῳ.Of help is found for Troy. This very night


ὃς εἰ διοίσει νύκτα τήνδ' ἐς αὔριονRhesus is come; who, if he see the light


οὔτε σφ' ̓Αχιλλεὺς οὔτ' ἂν Αἴαντος δόρυOf morning, not Achilles nor the rack


μὴ πάντα πέρσαι ναύσταθμ' ̓Αργείων σχέθοιEre wall and gate be shattered and inside


τείχη κατασκάψαντα καὶ πυλῶν ἔσωYour camp a spear-swept causeway builded wide


λόγχῃ πλατεῖαν ἐσδρομὴν ποιούμενον.To where beached galleys flame above the dead.


τοῦτον κατακτὰς πάντ' ἔχεις. τὰς δ' ̔́ΕκτοροςHim slay, and all is won. Let Hector’s head


εὐνὰς ἔασον καὶ καρατόμους σφαγάς:Sleep where it lies and draw unvexèd breath;


ἔσται γὰρ αὐτῷ θάνατος ἐξ ἄλλης χερός.Another’s work, not thine, is Hector’s death. ODYSSEUS.


δέσποιν' ̓Αθάνα, φθέγματος γὰρ ᾐσθόμηνMost high Athena, well I know the sound


τοῦ σοῦ συνήθη γῆρυν: ἐν πόνοισι γὰρOf that immortal voice. ’Tis ever found


παροῦς' ἀμύνεις τοῖς ἐμοῖς ἀεί ποτε:My helper in great perils.—Where doth lie


τὸν ἄνδρα δ' ἡμῖν, ποῦ κατηύνασται, φράσον:Rhesus, mid all this host of Barbary? numeration out of sync: 612 omitted ATHENA.


πόθεν τέτακται βαρβάρου στρατεύματος;Rhesus, mid all this host of Barbary? numeration out of sync: 612 omitted ATHENA.


ὅδ' ἐγγὺς ἧσται κοὐ συνήθροισται στρατῷFull near he lies, not mingled with the host


ἀλλ' ἐκτὸς αὐτὸν τάξεων κατηύνασενOf Troy, but here beyond the lines—a post


̔́Εκτωρ, ἕως ἂν νὺξ ἀμείψηται φάος.Of quiet till the dawn, that Hector found.


πέλας δὲ πῶλοι Θρῃκίων ἐξ ἁρμάτωνAnd near him, by his Thracian chariot bound


λευκαὶ δέδενται, διαπρεπεῖς ἐν εὐφρόνῃ:Two snow-white coursers gleam against the wan


στίλβουσι δ' ὥστε ποταμίου κύκνου πτερόν.Moon, like the white wing of a river swan.


ταύτας, κτανόντες δεσπότην, κομίζετεTheir master slain, take these to thine own hearth


κάλλιστον οἴκοις σκῦλον: οὐ γὰρ ἔσθ' ὅπουA wondrous spoil; there hides not upon earth


τοιόνδ' ὄχημα χθὼν κέκευθε πωλικόν.A chariot-team of war so swift and fair. ODYSSEUS.


Διόμηδες, ἢ σὺ κτεῖνε Θρῄκιον λεώνSay, Diomede, wilt make the men thy share


ἢ 'μοὶ πάρες γε, σοὶ δὲ χρὴ πώλους μέλειν.Or catch the steeds and leave the fight to me? DIOMEDE.


ἐγὼ φονεύσω, πωλοδαμνήσεις δὲ σύ:I take the killing, thou the stablery:


τρίβων γὰρ εἶ τὰ κομψὰ καὶ νοεῖν σοφός.It needs keen wit and a neat hand. The post


χρὴ δ' ἄνδρα τάσσειν οὗ μάλιστ' ἂν ὠφελοῖ.A man should take is where he helpeth most. ATHENA.


καὶ μὴν καθ' ἡμᾶς τόνδ' ̓Αλέξανδρον βλέπωBehold, ’tis Paris, hasting there toward


στείχοντα, φυλάκων ἔκ τινος πεπυσμένονThis tent. Methinks he knoweth from the guard


δόξας ἀσήμους πολεμίων μεμβλωκότων.Some noise of prowling Argives hither blown. DIOMEDE.


πότερα σὺν ἄλλοις ἢ μόνος πορεύεται;Comes he alone or with his guards? ATHENA.


μόνος: πρὸς εὐνὰς δ', ὡς ἔοικεν, ̔́ΕκτοροςAlone;


χωρεῖ, κατόπτας σημανῶν ἥκειν στρατοῦ.His message. He hath heard some tale of spies. DIOMEDE.


οὐκ οὖν ὑπάρχειν τόνδε κατθανόντα χρή;Then he shall be the first dead Trojan! ATHENA.


οὐκ ἂν δύναιο τοῦ πεπρωμένου πλέον.No;


τοῦτον δὲ πρὸς σῆς χειρὸς οὐ θέμις θανεῖν.Fate hath not willed that Paris by thy deed


ἀλλ' ᾧπερ ἥκεις μορσίμους φέρων σφαγάςShall die; it is another who must bleed


τάχυν': ἐγὼ δέ, τῷδε σύμμαχος ΚύπριςTo-night. Therefore be swift! Exeunt ODYSSEUS and DIOMEDE.


δοκοῦς' ἀρωγὸς ἐν πόνοις παραστατεῖνAnd help in need, that meets him in the night


σαθροῖς λόγοισιν ἐχθρὸν ἄνδρ' ἀμείψομαι.And soft shall be my words to him I hate.


καὶ ταῦτ' ἐγὼ μὲν εἶπον: ὃν δὲ χρὴ παθεῖνSo speak I; but on whom my spell is set


οὐκ οἶδεν οὐδ' ἤκουσεν ἐγγὺς ὢν λόγου.He hears not, sees not, though so near I stand. She becomes invisible where she stands. Enter PARIS. PARIS.


σὲ τὸν στρατηγὸν καὶ κασίγνητον λέγωHo, Hector! Brother! General of the land!


̔́Εκτορ, καθεύδεις; οὐκ ἐγείρεσθαί σε χρῆν;Sleepest thou still? We need thy waking sight.


ἐχθρῶν τις ἡμῖν χρίμπτεται στρατεύματιOur guards have marked some prowler of the night


ἢ κλῶπες ἄνδρες ἢ κατάσκοποί τινες.We know not if a mere thief or a spy. ATHENA becomes visible again, but seems changed and her voice softer. ATHENA.


θάρσει: φυλάσσει ς' ἥδε πρευμενὴς Κύπρις.Have comfort thou! Doth not the Cyprian’s eye


μέλει δ' ὁ σός μοι πόλεμος, οὐδ' ἀμνημονῶThy battles? How shall I forget the love


τιμῆς, ἐπαινῶ δ' εὖ παθοῦσα πρὸς σέθεν.I owe thee, and thy faithful offices?


καὶ νῦν ἐπ' εὐτυχοῦντι Τρωικῷ στρατῷTo crown this day and all its victories


ἥκω πορεύους' ἄνδρα σοι μέγαν φίλονLo, I have guided here to Troy a strong


τῆς ὑμνοποιοῦ παῖδα Θρῄκιον θεᾶςHelper, the scion of the Muse of song


Μούσης: πατρὸς δὲ Στρυμόνος κικλήσκεται.And Strymon’s flood, the crownèd stream of Thrace . PARIS. (standing like one in a dream)


αἰεί ποτ' εὖ φρονοῦσα τυγχάνεις πόλειIndeed thy love is steadfast, and thy grace


κἀμοί, μέγιστον δ' ἐν βίῳ κειμήλιονAnd jewel of my days, which I to Troy


κρίνας σέ φημι τῇδε προσθέσθαι πόλει.Have brought, and made thee hers.—O Cyprian


ἥκω δ' ἀκούσας οὐ τορῶς — φήμη δέ τιςI heard, not clearly,—’twas some talk that ran


φύλαξιν ἐμπέπτωκεν — ὡς κατάσκοποιAmong the pickets—spies had passed some spot


ἥκους' ̓Αχαιῶν. χὣ μὲν οὐκ ἰδὼν λέγειClose by the camp. The men who saw them not


ὃ δ' εἰσιδὼν μολόντας οὐκ ἔχει φράσαι:Talk much, and they who saw, or might have seen


ὧν οὕνεκ' εὐνὰς ἤλυθον πρὸς ̔́Εκτορος.My purpose to find Hector where he lay. ATHENA.


μηδὲν φοβηθῇς: οὐδὲν ἐν στρατῷ νέον:Fear nothing. All is well in Troy’s array.


̔́Εκτωρ δὲ φροῦδος Θρῇκα κοιμήσων στρατόν.Hector is gone to help those Thracians sleep. PARIS.


σύ τοί με πείθεις, σοῖς δὲ πιστεύων λόγοιςThy word doth rule me, Goddess. Yea, so deep


τάξιν φυλάξων εἶμ' ἐλεύθερος φόβου.My trust is, that all thought of fear is lost


χώρει: μέλειν γὰρ πάντ' ἐμοὶ δόκει τὰ σάGo. And remember that thy fortunes still


ὥστ' εὐτυχοῦντας συμμάχους ἐμοὺς ὁρᾶν.Are watched by me, and they who do my will


γνώσῃ δὲ καὶ σὺ τὴν ἐμὴν προθυμίαν.Prosper in all their ways. Aye, thou shalt prove


ὑμᾶς δ' ἀυτῶ τοὺς ἄγαν ἐρρωμένουςEre long, if I can care for those I love. Exit PARIS. She raises her voice.


Λαερτίου παῖ, θηκτὰ κοιμίσαι ξίφη.Back, back, ye twain! Are ye in love with death?


κεῖται γὰρ ἡμῖν Θρῄκιος στρατηλάτηςLaertes ’ son, thy sword into the sheath!


ἵπποι τ' ἔχονται, πολέμιοι δ' ᾐσθημένοιOur golden Thracian gaspeth in his blood;


χωροῦς' ἐφ' ὑμᾶς: ἀλλ' ὅσον τάχιστα χρὴThe steeds are ours; the foe hath understood


φεύγειν πρὸς ὁλκοὺς ναυστάθμων. τί μέλλετεAnd crowds against you. Haste ye! haste to fly,—


σκηπτοῦ 'πιόντος πολεμίων σῷσαι βίον;Ere yet the lightning falleth, and ye die! ATHENA vanishes; a noise of tumult is heard. Enter a crowd of Thracians running in confusion, in the midst of them ODYSSEUS and DIOMEDE. VOICES. (amid the tumult)


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 10.252-10.253, 11.1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

10.252. /this thou sayest among the Argives that themselves know all. Nay, let us go, for verily the night is waning and dawn draweth near; lo, the stars have moved onward, and of the night more than two watches have past, and the third alone is left us. 10.253. /this thou sayest among the Argives that themselves know all. Nay, let us go, for verily the night is waning and dawn draweth near; lo, the stars have moved onward, and of the night more than two watches have past, and the third alone is left us. 11.1. /Now Dawn rose from her couch from beside lordly Tithonus, to bring light to immortals and to mortal men; and Zeus sent forth Strife unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, dread Strife, bearing in her hands a portent of war.
2. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 255-275, 254 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

254. ὅρα ὅρα μάλʼ αὖ 254. Look! Look again!
3. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 205-240, 280-327, 204 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

204. τῇδε πᾶς ἕπου δίωκε καὶ τὸν ἄνδρα πυνθάνου
4. Euripides, Bacchae, 1331-1350, 1330 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1330. δράκων γενήσῃ μεταβαλών, δάμαρ τε σὴ 1330. . . . changing your form, you will become a dragon, and your wife, Harmonia, Ares’ daughter, whom you though mortal held in marriage, will be turned into a beast, and will receive in exchange the form of a serpent. And as the oracle of Zeus says, you will drive along with your wife a chariot of heifers, ruling over barbarians.
5. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 816-820, 822-873, 815 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

815. —Ha! see there, my old comrades! is the same wild panic fallen on us all; what phantom is this I see hovering over the house?
6. Euripides, Rhesus, 101-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-152, 158-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-183, 19, 191, 2, 20, 205, 208-209, 21-22, 227, 23-28, 284-289, 29, 290-291, 294-295, 30, 301, 31, 310, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-399, 4, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-499, 5, 500-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-595, 597-599, 6, 600-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-681, 683-689, 69, 690-691, 697, 70, 707, 709, 71-72, 720, 727, 73, 736-737, 74-75, 762-769, 773-774, 78, 780-789, 792-793, 802-803, 809, 81, 816, 824, 833-839, 84, 840-855, 87-90, 906-909, 91, 910-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-982, 985, 99-100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. I mean to lame them in their climbing, I
7. Sophocles, Ajax, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-133, 14-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-86, 866-869, 87, 870-878, 88-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Sophocles, Electra, 7, 6 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actors/acting, deuteragonistos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
actors/acting, protagonistos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
actors/acting, tritagonistos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
aeschylus, and pseudo-euripides rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75, 80
agon logon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 74
characters, tragic/mythical, achilles Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 74
characters, tragic/mythical, aeneas Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
characters, tragic/mythical, ajax, salaminian (telamonian) Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 74
characters, tragic/mythical, aphrodite Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
characters, tragic/mythical, diomedes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, dolon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, furies (erinyes) Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
characters, tragic/mythical, hector Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, muse Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68
characters, tragic/mythical, odysseus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, paris-alexandros Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68
characters, tragic/mythical, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75, 80
chorostatas (kho-), in postclassical tragic plays/performances Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75, 80
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
diomedes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
epiparodos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, prologue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, reversal epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
euripides, and the rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
euripides, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75, 80
hera Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
homer Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
homeric hymns Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
impasse, dramatic Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
initiation Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
inspiration Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
iris Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
lycus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
odysseus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
peripeteia (reversal of dramatic plot) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
personification of abstract notions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
playwrights, comedy (greek), aristophanes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
plot, emplotment Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
plot Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
prophecy, foretelling the future' Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
rage / lyssa (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
reliance on passages from earlier drama, sources Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
reliance on passages from earlier drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
rhesus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, and thrace/thracian cult/lore Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, cletic hymn, in Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, dramaturgy and stagecraft Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, language and style Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, metre and diction Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
satyr drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75, 80
sophocles, and the rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68, 75, 80
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 98