Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5638
Euripides, Rhesus, 500-526


καὶ πλεῖστα χώραν τήνδ' ἀνὴρ καθυβρίσας:No man of them hath harmed us more than he.


ὃς εἰς ̓Αθάνας σηκὸν ἔννυχος μολὼνHe climbed here to Athena’s sanctuary P. 27, l. 501 ff. These three achievements of Odysseus are all in the traditional saga. The Rapt of the Palladium, or figure of Pallas, by Odysseus and Diomedes, was in an old lost epic, called The Little Iliad; the Begging in Troy in the Little Iliad and also in Odyssey IV. 242 ff.; the great ambuscades in Odyssey IV. 290 ff., VIII. 493 ff., and in Odysseus’s own feigned story, XIV. 468 ff. According to our tradition they belong to a later period of the war than the death of Rhesus, but perhaps the sequence was different, or not so definite, at the time of this play.


κλέψας ἄγαλμα ναῦς ἐπ' ̓Αργείων φέρει.One night, and stole her image clean away


ἤδη δ' ἀγύρτης πτωχικὴν ἔχων στολὴνGuised as a wandering priest, in rags, he came


ἐσῆλθε πύργους, πολλὰ δ' ̓Αργείοις κακὰAnd walked straight through the Gates, made loud acclaim


ἠρᾶτο, πεμφθεὶς ̓Ιλίου κατάσκοπος:All that he sought in Ilion , and was gone—


κτανὼν δὲ φρουροὺς καὶ παραστάτας πυλῶνGone, and the watch and helpers of the Gate


ἐξῆλθεν: αἰεὶ δ' ἐν λόχοις εὑρίσκεταιDead! And in every ambush they have set


Θυμβραῖον ἀμφὶ βωμὸν ἄστεως πέλαςBy the old Altar, close to Troy, we know


θάσσων: κακῷ δὲ μερμέρῳ παλαίομεν.He sits—a murderous reptile of a foe! RHESUS.


οὐδεὶς ἀνὴρ εὔψυχος ἀξιοῖ λάθρᾳNo brave man seeks so dastardly to harm


κτεῖναι τὸν ἐχθρόν, ἀλλ' ἰὼν κατὰ στόμα.His battle-foes; he meets them arm to arm.


τοῦτον δ' ὃν ἵζειν φὴς σὺ κλωπικὰς ἕδραςThis Greek of thine, this sitter like a thief


καὶ μηχανᾶσθαι, ζῶντα συλλαβὼν ἐγὼIn ambush, I will make of him my chief


πυλῶν ἐπ' ἐξόδοισιν ἀμπείρας ῥάχινCare. I will take him living, drive a straight


στήσω πετεινοῖς γυψὶ θοινατήριον.Stake through him, and so star him at the Gate


λῃστὴν γὰρ ὄντα καὶ θεῶν ἀνάκτοραTo feed your wide-winged vultures. ’Tis the death


συλῶντα δεῖ νιν τῷδε κατθανεῖν μόρῳ.God’s sanctuary, or so we hold in Thrace . HECTOR. (making no answer)


νῦν μὲν καταυλίσθητε: καὶ γὰρ εὐφρόνη.Seek first some sleep. There still remains a space


δείξω δ' ἐγώ σοι χῶρον, ἔνθα χρὴ στρατὸνOf darkness.—I will show the spot that best


τὸν σὸν νυχεῦσαι τοῦ τεταγμένου δίχα.May suit you, somewhat sundered from the rest.


ξύνθημα δ' ἡμῖν Φοῖβος, ἤν τι καὶ δέῃ:Should need arise, the password of the night


μέμνης' ἀκούσας, Θρῃκί τ' ἄγγειλον στρατῷ.Is Phoebus: see your Thracians have it right. Turning to the Guards before he goes.


ὑμᾶς δὲ βάντας χρὴ προταινὶ τάξεωνAdvance beyond your stations, men, at some


φρουρεῖν ἐγερτὶ καὶ νεῶν κατάσκοπονDistance, and stay on watch till Dolon come


δέχθαι Δόλωνα: καὶ γάρ, εἴπερ ἐστὶ σῶςWith word of the Argives’ counsel. If his vow


ἤδη πελάζει στρατοπέδοισι Τρωικοῖς.Prosper, he should be nearing us by now. P. 28, l. 528. Rhesus shows the simple courage of a barbarian in his contempt for the ruses of Odysseus, the brutality of a barbarian in the methods of punishment he proposes. Such proposals would disgust a Greek; it looks as if they displeased Hector. In any case his abruptness here, and his careful indication of the place where the Thracians are to sleep, far from the rest of the camp, have some dramatic value for the sequel. Exeunt HECTOR and RHESUS and Attendants. The Guards, who have been below, come forward sleepily from the camp fire, and sit watching by HECTOR’S tent. CHORUS. Pp. 28-30, 11. 527-564, Stars and Nightingale chorus.]—The beauty of these lines in the Greek is quite magical, but the stage management of the scene is difficult. Apparently Hector (1. 523) bids the Guards come forward from where they are and wait nearer the front for Dolon; obeying this they come up from the orchestra, we may suppose, to the stage. Then watching somewhere near Hector’s tent they partly express, in the usual song, the lyrical emotion of the night, partly they chat about Dolon and the order of the watches. The scene is technically very interesting with its rather abrupt introduction of realism into the high convention of tragedy. Meantime the Trojans’ time of watch is over and the Lycians, who ought to watch next, have not come. In a modern army it would of course be the duty of the new watch to come and relieve the old; in an ancient barbaric army—characteristically—the old watch had to go and wake the new. You could not, one must suppose, trust them to take their turn otherwise. At the end of the first strophe a Guard suggests that they should rouse the Lycians; at the end of the second the Leader definitely gives the word to do so. The Guards go, and so the stage (and orchestra) is left empty. This is plain enough; but why were the Guards brought away from their original position—from the orchestra to the stage? Probably to allow the Greek spies to pass on towards the Thracian camp by a different and unoccupied way, not by the way which the Guards had just taken. The story of the Nightingale is well known: she was Philomêla, or in the older story Procnê, an Athenian princess, wedded to the faithless Thracian king, Têreus. In a fury of vengeance on her husband she slew their only son, Itys or Itylus, and now laments him broken-hearted for ever.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 10.252-10.253, 10.333-10.334, 11.1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

10.252. /this thou sayest among the Argives that themselves know all. Nay, let us go, for verily the night is waning and dawn draweth near; lo, the stars have moved onward, and of the night more than two watches have past, and the third alone is left us. 10.253. /this thou sayest among the Argives that themselves know all. Nay, let us go, for verily the night is waning and dawn draweth near; lo, the stars have moved onward, and of the night more than two watches have past, and the third alone is left us. 10.333. /that on those horses no other man of the Trojans shall mount, but it is thou, I declare, that shalt have glory in them continually. 10.334. /that on those horses no other man of the Trojans shall mount, but it is thou, I declare, that shalt have glory in them continually. So spake he, and swore thereto an idle oath, and stirred the heart of Dolon. Forthwith then he cast about his shoulders his curved bow, and thereover clad him in the skin of a grey wolf 11.1. /Now Dawn rose from her couch from beside lordly Tithonus, to bring light to immortals and to mortal men; and Zeus sent forth Strife unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, dread Strife, bearing in her hands a portent of war.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 4.242-4.264 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 255-275, 254 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

254. ὅρα ὅρα μάλʼ αὖ 254. Look! Look again!
4. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 205-240, 280-327, 204 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

204. τῇδε πᾶς ἕπου δίωκε καὶ τὸν ἄνδρα πυνθάνου
5. Euripides, Rhesus, 101-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-152, 158-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-183, 19, 191, 2, 20, 205, 208-209, 21-22, 227, 23-28, 284-289, 29, 290-291, 294-295, 30, 301, 31, 310, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-399, 4, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-499, 5, 501-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-599, 6, 600-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-681, 683-689, 69, 690-691, 697, 70, 707, 709, 71-72, 720, 727, 73, 736-737, 74-75, 762-769, 773-774, 78, 780-789, 792-793, 802-803, 809, 81, 816, 824, 833-839, 84, 840-855, 87-90, 906-909, 91, 910-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-982, 985, 99-100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. I mean to lame them in their climbing, I
6. Sophocles, Ajax, 867-878, 866 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Sophocles, Electra, 7, 6 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actors/acting, deuteragonistos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
actors/acting, protagonistos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
actors/acting, tritagonistos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
aeschylus, and pseudo-euripides rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
agon logon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 74
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 421, 425
boulê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 421
characters, tragic/mythical, achilles Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 74
characters, tragic/mythical, aeneas Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
characters, tragic/mythical, ajax, salaminian (telamonian) Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 74
characters, tragic/mythical, aphrodite Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
characters, tragic/mythical, diomedes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, dolon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 71, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, furies (erinyes) Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
characters, tragic/mythical, hector Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 71, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, muse Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68
characters, tragic/mythical, odysseus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 71, 74, 75
characters, tragic/mythical, paris-alexandros Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68
characters, tragic/mythical, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 71, 74, 75
chorostatas (kho-), in postclassical tragic plays/performances Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 71, 74, 75
costume, tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 71
ekklêsia (athenian assembly)' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 421
epic cycle Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 71
epiparodos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
euripides, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67, 68, 71, 74, 75
euripides Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
fantuzzi, m. xix Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 421, 425
fear Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
hector Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
homeric hymns Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 421
illumination Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
metaphor Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
night/nighttime, as deity Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
odysseus Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
orkhosis, see dance, palladion, theft of Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 71
pindar Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 71
playwrights, comedy (greek), aristophanes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
reliance on passages from earlier drama, sources Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68, 71
rhesus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 421, 425
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, and thrace/thracian cult/lore Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68, 71
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, cletic hymn, in Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 67
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, dramaturgy and stagecraft Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
satyr drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
sleep Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
sophocles, and the rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 68, 75
transgression Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
trojan war Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
wakefulness Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 171
xenophon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 425