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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5636
Euripides, Phoenician Women, 550-567


τιμᾷς ὑπέρφευ καὶ μέγ' ἥγησαι τόδε;why do you think so much of it? Admiring glances are to be prized? No, that is an empty pleasure. Or do you want to have many troubles from the many riches in your house? What advantage is it? The name only; for the wise find what suffices to be enough.


περιβλέπεσθαι τίμιον; κενὸν μὲν οὖν.why do you think so much of it? Admiring glances are to be prized? No, that is an empty pleasure. Or do you want to have many troubles from the many riches in your house? What advantage is it? The name only; for the wise find what suffices to be enough.


ἢ πολλὰ μοχθεῖν πόλλ' ἔχων ἐν δώμασιwhy do you think so much of it? Admiring glances are to be prized? No, that is an empty pleasure. Or do you want to have many troubles from the many riches in your house? What advantage is it? The name only; for the wise find what suffices to be enough.


βούλῃ; τί δ' ἔστι τὸ πλέον; ὄνομ' ἔχει μόνον:why do you think so much of it? Admiring glances are to be prized? No, that is an empty pleasure. Or do you want to have many troubles from the many riches in your house? What advantage is it? The name only; for the wise find what suffices to be enough.


ἐπεὶ τά γ' ἀρκοῦνθ' ἱκανὰ τοῖς γε σώφροσιν.why do you think so much of it? Admiring glances are to be prized? No, that is an empty pleasure. Or do you want to have many troubles from the many riches in your house? What advantage is it? The name only; for the wise find what suffices to be enough.


οὔτοι τὰ χρήματ' ἴδια κέκτηνται βροτοίMortals indeed have no possessions of their own; we hold the management of the gods’ property; and when they will, they take it back again. Prosperity is not secure, but as transient as the day.


τὰ τῶν θεῶν δ' ἔχοντες ἐπιμελούμεθα:Mortals indeed have no possessions of their own; we hold the management of the gods’ property; and when they will, they take it back again. Prosperity is not secure, but as transient as the day.


ὅταν δὲ χρῄζως', αὔτ' ἀφαιροῦνται πάλιν.Mortals indeed have no possessions of their own; we hold the management of the gods’ property; and when they will, they take it back again. Prosperity is not secure, but as transient as the day.


ὁ δ' ὄλβος οὐ βέβαιος, ἀλλ' ἐφήμερος.Mortals indeed have no possessions of their own; we hold the management of the gods’ property; and when they will, they take it back again. Prosperity is not secure, but as transient as the day.


ἄγ', ἤν ς' ἔρωμαι δύο λόγω προθεῖς' ἅμαCome, suppose I put before you two alternatives, and ask you


πότερα τυραννεῖν ἢ πόλιν σῷσαι θέλειςwhether you wish to rule or save your city? Will you say you wish to rule?


ἐρεῖς τυραννεῖν; ἢν δὲ νικήσῃ ς' ὅδε;whether you wish to rule or save your city? Will you say you wish to rule?


̓Αργεῖά τ' ἔγχη δόρυ τὸ Καδμείων ἕλῃAgain, if this man conquers you and his Argive warriors take the army of Cadmus, you will see this city of Thebes conquered, and you will see many captured maiden


ὄψῃ δαμασθὲν ἄστυ Θηβαῖον τόδεAgain, if this man conquers you and his Argive warriors take the army of Cadmus, you will see this city of Thebes conquered, and you will see many captured maiden


ὄψῃ δὲ πολλὰς αἰχμαλωτίδας κόραςAgain, if this man conquers you and his Argive warriors take the army of Cadmus, you will see this city of Thebes conquered, and you will see many captured maiden


βίᾳ πρὸς ἀνδρῶν πολεμίων πορθουμένας.brutally dishonored by men of the enemy. Then that wealth you seek to have will become grievous to Thebes ; but still ambition fills you.


ὀδυνηρὸς ἆρ' ὁ πλοῦτος, ὃν ζητεῖς ἔχεινbrutally dishonored by men of the enemy. Then that wealth you seek to have will become grievous to Thebes ; but still ambition fills you.


γενήσεται Θήβαισι, φιλότιμος δὲ σύ.brutally dishonored by men of the enemy. Then that wealth you seek to have will become grievous to Thebes ; but still ambition fills you.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 699, 604 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

604. δήμου κρατοῦσα χεὶρ ὅπῃ πληθύνεται. Δαναός
2. Euripides, Fragments, 1013-1015, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1013-1015, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Ion, 596-606, 595 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

595. and if I win my way to the highest place in the state, and seek to be some one, I shall be hated by those who have no influence, for superiority is galling; while ’mongst men of worth who could show their wisdom, but are silent, and take no interest in politics
5. Euripides, Orestes, 908-913, 907 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 182, 2, 202-228, 239-249, 282, 3, 344-356, 396, 4, 40, 403, 468-472, 481-495, 499, 5, 500-549, 551-567, 588, 6, 614, 626-630, 658, 662, 69, 7, 70-76, 79, 8-9, 940-946, 97, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. O Sun-god, you who cut your path in heaven’s stars, mounted on a chariot inlaid with gold and whirling out your flame with swift horses, what an unfortunate beam you shed on Thebes , the day
7. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 239-245, 414-416, 442-455, 238 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Sophocles, Ajax, 712 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Sophocles, Antigone, 160, 843, 940, 988, 159 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 5.105 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
12. Papyri, P.Oxy., 5203



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides (sophist)\n, citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
aeschylus, dramas by\n, eumenides Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
aeschylus, dramas by\n, ransom of hector Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
aeschylus, dramas by\n, suppliant women Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
agamemnon, seven against thebes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 348
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600
athens, as tyranny Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 108
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 348
choruses/choreuts, tragic Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
choruses/choreuts Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
creon (king of thebes) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
deidameia (tragic drama) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
diodotus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600
dionysius i of syracuse Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
epagathus (choraules) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
epictetus (philosopher) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
eupolis (comic poet), androgynoi Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, antiope Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, hypsipyle Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, medea Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, phoenissae Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 108
favorinus, on exile Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 348
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
iphigenia at aulis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 348
logos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600
melian debate Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 108
menander (comic poet), androgynos Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
oligarchs/oligarchy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
on exile Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
orestes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600
papyri, preserving tragedy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
pericles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600
philostratus (the younger), citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
phoenician women Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 348
projection, in tragedy Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 108
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600
sophocles, antigone Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 348
sophocles, dramas by\n, antigone Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles, dramas by\n, trachiniae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles (tragic poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
stesichorus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 348
swift, l. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 348
teichoskopia' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
thucydides Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600
tragedy, choruses of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
tyranny, in tragedy Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 108
tyrants/ tyranny Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206