Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5636
Euripides, Phoenician Women, 524-525


εἴπερ γὰρ ἀδικεῖν χρή, τυραννίδος πέριShall I become his slave, when I can rule? Therefore come fire, come sword! Harness your horses, fill the plains with chariots, for I will not give up my tyranny to him. For if we must do wrong, to do so for tyranny


κάλλιστον ἀδικεῖν, τἄλλα δ' εὐσεβεῖν χρεών.is the fairest cause, but in all else piety should be our aim. Chorus Leader


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Euripides, Electra, 1001-1010, 1024-1029, 1032, 1035, 1055-1059, 1064, 1071-1073, 1097, 1107, 1118-1119, 1124-1131, 524-544, 998-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Euripides, Hecuba, 1188-1196, 251-295, 1187 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1187. ̓Αγάμεμνον, ἀνθρώποισιν οὐκ ἐχρῆν ποτε 1187. Never ought words to have outweighed deeds in this world, Agamemnon. No! if a man’s deeds were good, so should his words have been;
3. Euripides, Hippolytus, 972, 971 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Medea, 346-347, 475, 515, 522, 546, 576-578, 324 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 345-356, 396, 403, 468-472, 481-495, 499-523, 525-567, 344 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 164, 176-179, 188-189, 203-204, 163 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1001-1059, 860-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. did you ever raise, though Castor was still alive, a vigorous youth, and his brother also, not yet among the stars? Then when you had come to Troy , and the Argives were on your track, and the mortal combat had begun, whenever tidings came to you of
8. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.82.8, 5.105 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.82.8. The cause of all these evils was the lust for power arising from greed and ambition; and from these passions proceeded the violence of parties once engaged in contention. The leaders in the cities, each provided with the fairest professions, on the one side with the cry of political equality of the people, on the other of a moderate aristocracy, sought prizes for themselves in those public interests which they pretended to cherish, and, recoiling from no means in their struggles for ascendancy, engaged in the direct excesses; in their acts of vengeance they went to even greater lengths, not stopping at what justice or the good of the state demanded, but making the party caprice of the moment their only standard, and invoking with equal readiness the condemnation of an unjust verdict or the authority of the strong arm to glut the animosities of the hour. Thus religion was in honor with neither party; but the use of fair phrases to arrive at guilty ends was in high reputation. Meanwhile the moderate part of the citizens perished between the two, either for not joining in the quarrel, or because envy would not suffer them to escape.
9. Cicero, On Duties, 3.82 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.82. Est ergo ulla res tanti aut commodum ullum tam expetendum, ut viri boni et splendorem et nomen amittas? Quid est, quod afferre tantum utilitas ista, quae dicitur, possit, quantum auferre, si boni viri nomen eripuerit, fidem iustitiamque detraxerit? Quid enim interest, utrum ex homine se convertat quis in beluam an hominis figura immanitatem gerat beluae? Quid? qui omnia recta et honesta neglegunt, dum modo potentiam consequantur, nonne idem faciunt, quod is, qui etiam socerum habere voluit eum, cuius ipse audacia potens esset? Utile ei videbatur plurimum posse alterius invidia; id quam iniustum in patriam et quam turpe esset, non videbat. Ipse autem socer in ore semper Graecos versus de Phoenissis habebat, quos dicam, ut potero, incondite fortasse, sed tamen, ut res possit intellegi: Nam sí violandum est Iús, regdi grátia Violándum est; aliis rébus pietatém colas. Capitalis Eteocles vel potius Euripides, qui id unum, quod omnum sceleratissimum fuerit, exceperit! 3.82.  Is there, then, any object of such value or any advantage so worth the winning that, to gain it, one should sacrifice the name of a "good man" and the lustre of his reputation? What is there that your so‑called expediency can bring to you that will compensate for what it can take away, if it steals from you the name of a "good man" and causes you to lose your sense of honour and justice? For what difference does it make whether a man is actually transformed into a beast or whether, keeping the outward appearance of a man, he has the savage nature of a beast within? Again, when people disregard everything that is morally right and true, if only they may secure power thereby, are they not pursuing the same course as he who wished to have as a father-in‑law the man by whose effrontery he might gain power for himself? He thought it advantageous to secure supreme power while the odium of it fell upon another; and he failed to see how unjust to his country this was, and how wrong morally. But the father-in‑law himself used to have continually upon his lips the Greek verses from the Phoenissae, which I will reproduce as well as I can — awkwardly, it may be, but still so that the meaning can be understood: "If wrong may e'er be right, for a throne's sake Were wrong most right:— be God in all else feared!" Our tyrant deserved his death for having made an exception of the one thing that was the blackest crime of all.
10. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 17.6 (1st cent. CE

17.6.  We know, for instance, that inflamed parts of the body do not yield at once to the first fomentation, but that if the treatment is continued, the swelling is softened and relief is given. So in a like manner we must be well content if we are able to assuage the inflammation in the souls of the many by the unceasing use of the word of reason. So I maintain in regard to covetousness too, that all men do know it is neither expedient nor honourable, but the cause of the greatest evils; and that in spite of all this, not one man refrains from it or is willing to have equality of possessions with his neighbour.
11. Plutarch, Comparison of Crassus With Nicias, 3.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.1. prodikoi by the Lacedaemonians.
12. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 58.24.3-58.24.4, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

58.24.3.  Among the various persons who perished either at the hands of the executioners or by their own act was Pomponius Labeo. This man, who had once governed Moesia for eight years after his praetorship, was indicted, together with his wife, for taking bribes, and voluntarily perished along with her. Mamercus Aemilius Scaurus, on the other hand, who had never governed a province or accepted bribes, was convicted because of a tragedy he had composed, and fell a victim to a worse fate than that which he had described. 58.24.4.  "Atreus" was the name of his drama, and in the manner of Euripides it advised one of the subjects of that monarch to endure the folly of the reigning prince. Tiberius, upon hearing of it, declared that this had been written with reference to him, claiming that he himself was "Atreus" because of his bloodthirstiness; and remarking, "I will make him Ajax," he compelled him to commit suicide. 59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
13. Papyri, P.Oxy., 5203



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides (sophist)\n, citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
aeschylus, dramas by\n, ransom of hector Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
agamemnon, choephoroi (libation bearers) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 611
agamemnon, seven against thebes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 348
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578, 600, 611
allusions, closural Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
allusions, literary Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
allusions, tragic Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
allusions Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
alternatives Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
ambition/ambitious Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
apollo Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 611
aristophanes, frogs Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 611
aristophanes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 611
aristotle, poetics Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
athenians, and nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
athenians Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
athens, as tyranny Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 108
barbarians, contrasted with greeks Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 348
citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
closure (endings of biographies) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
contrasts, as theme in plutarchs narrative Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
contrasts Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
cowardice Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
crassus Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
criticism, plutarchs Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
criticism Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
deidameia (tragic drama) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 611
democracy, in tragedy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 213
dio of prusa (chrysostom)\n, citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 171
dio of prusa (chrysostom)\n, on fame Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 171
diodotus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600
dionysius i of syracuse Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578, 611
epagathus (choraules) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
epictetus (philosopher) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
eupolis (comic poet), androgynoi Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, antiope Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, archelaus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 213
euripides, dramas by\n, hypsipyle Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, medea Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, phoenissae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 171, 213
euripides, phoenissae Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 108
euripides Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
examples (i.e. paradigm), comparative/parallel Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
examples (i.e. paradigm) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
experience, of characters (individual and collective) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
favorinus, on exile Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
fortune, mis- Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
gaps (= blanks) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
general statements (moral) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 348, 578
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
ion Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 611
iphigenia at aulis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 348
isonomia Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 213
julius caesar Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 171
lloyd, m. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 611
logos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600
love of command (philarchia) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
mamercus aemilius scaurus (rhetor and poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 171
melian debate Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 108
menander (comic poet), androgynos Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
nero (emperor) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 171
nicias, and sicilian expedition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
nicias, compared with crassus Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
on exile Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
orestes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 611
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578, 600
papyri, preserving tragedy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
parthians Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
pericles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600
philostratus (the younger), citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
philostratus (the younger) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 171
philotimia Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 213
phoenician women Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 348, 350
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 611
pleonexia (greed) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 171, 213
polarities Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
posthumous, material Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
posthumous Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
projection, in tragedy Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 108
readers, real-life Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
realism Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 611
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578, 600
rhêsis/eis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
romans, and crassus Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
romans Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
sicilians/sicily Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
sophocles, antigone Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 348
stesichorus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 348
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 611
swift, l. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 348, 350
synkrisis, formal Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
teichoskopia' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
thucydides Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 600, 611
tiberius (emperor) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 171
tragedy/tragic Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 120
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
tyranny, in tragedy Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 108