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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5636
Euripides, Phoenician Women, 469-472


ἁπλοῦς ὁ μῦθος τῆς ἀληθείας ἔφυThe words of truth are naturally simple


κοὐ ποικίλων δεῖ τἄνδιχ' ἑρμηνευμάτων:and justice needs no subtle interpretations, for it has a fitness in itself; but the words of injustice, being sick in themselves, require clever treatment. I provided for his interests and mine in our father’s house, being anxious to escape the curse


ἔχει γὰρ αὐτὰ καιρόν: ὁ δ' ἄδικος λόγοςand justice needs no subtle interpretations, for it has a fitness in itself; but the words of injustice, being sick in themselves, require clever treatment. I provided for his interests and mine in our father’s house, being anxious to escape the curse


νοσῶν ἐν αὑτῷ φαρμάκων δεῖται σοφῶν.and justice needs no subtle interpretations, for it has a fitness in itself; but the words of injustice, being sick in themselves, require clever treatment. I provided for his interests and mine in our father’s house, being anxious to escape the curse


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. Κάδμου πολῖται, χρὴ λέγειν τὰ καίρια 1. Men of Cadmus’s city, he who guards from the stern the concerns of the State and guides its helm with eyes untouched by sleep must speak to the point. For if we succeed, the responsibility is heaven’s;
2. Aristophanes, Frogs, 775 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

775. τῶν ἀντιλογιῶν καὶ λυγισμῶν καὶ στροφῶν
3. Euripides, Electra, 1001-1010, 1024-1029, 1032, 1035, 1055-1059, 1064, 1071-1073, 1097, 1107, 1118-1119, 1124-1131, 998-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Hecuba, 251-295, 1187 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1187. ̓Αγάμεμνον, ἀνθρώποισιν οὐκ ἐχρῆν ποτε 1187. Never ought words to have outweighed deeds in this world, Agamemnon. No! if a man’s deeds were good, so should his words have been;
5. Euripides, Helen, 548-549, 8, 138 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

138. τεθνᾶσι καὶ οὐ τεθνᾶσι: δύο δ' ἐστὸν λόγω. 138. They are dead, and not dead: it is a double story. Helen
6. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 159-164, 158 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Hippolytus, 386-387, 925-931, 971-972, 385 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

385. likewise there is shame which is of two kinds, one a noble quality, the other a curse to families; but if for each its proper time were clearly known, these twain could not have had the selfsame letters to denote them.
8. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 392, 394-395, 407, 433, 473-476, 506-512, 542, 590-606, 610, 614, 616, 619-620, 623, 675-676, 391 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Medea, 200, 324, 346-347, 475, 515, 522, 526, 546, 579-583, 199 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 182, 2, 202-228, 239-249, 3, 344-356, 396, 4, 40, 403, 468, 470-472, 481-495, 499, 5, 500-567, 588, 6, 614, 626-630, 7, 79, 8-9, 97, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. O Sun-god, you who cut your path in heaven’s stars, mounted on a chariot inlaid with gold and whirling out your flame with swift horses, what an unfortunate beam you shed on Thebes , the day
11. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 164, 176-179, 188-189, 195-199, 297-300, 403, 426-428, 163 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1001-1059, 860-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. did you ever raise, though Castor was still alive, a vigorous youth, and his brother also, not yet among the stars? Then when you had come to Troy , and the Argives were on your track, and the mortal combat had begun, whenever tidings came to you of
13. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

17b. because I was a clever speaker. For I thought it the most shameless part of their conduct that they are not ashamed because they will immediately be convicted by me of falsehood by the evidence of fact, when I show myself to be not in the least a clever speaker, unless indeed they call him a clever speaker who speaks the truth; for if this is what they mean, I would agree that I am an orator—not after their fashion. Now they, as I say, have said little or nothing true; but you shall hear from me nothing but the truth. Not, however, men of Athens, speeches finely tricked out with words and phrases
14. Sophocles, Electra, 976-981, 975 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 32, 31 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.67.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.67.6. Vindicate, therefore, Lacedaemonians, the Hellenic law which they have broken; and to us, the victims of its violation, grant the reward merited by our zeal. Nor let us be supplanted in your favour by their harangues, but offer an example to the Hellenes, that the contests to which you invite them are of deeds, not words: good deeds can be shortly stated, but where wrong is done a wealth of language is needed to veil its deformity.
17. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
18. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 7.49-7.50, 7.110 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

19. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 9.72 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9.72. Furthermore, they find Xenophanes, Zeno of Elea, and Democritus to be sceptics: Xenophanes because he says,Clear truth hath no man seen nor e'er shall knowand Zeno because he would destroy motion, saying, A moving body moves neither where it is nor where it is not; Democritus because he rejects qualities, saying, Opinion says hot or cold, but the reality is atoms and empty space, and again, of a truth we know nothing, for truth is in a well. Plato, too, leaves the truth to gods and sons of gods, and seeks after the probable explanation. Euripides says:
20. Papyri, P.Oxy., 5203



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides (sophist)\n, citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
aeschylus, dramas by\n, ransom of hector Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
aeschylus, language Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
against heracleius (julian) Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
allegory Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
anthological tradition Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 169
antiope Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 30
archilochus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
aristotle, poetics Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
authority (auctoritas/axiōma) Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
characters, tragic/mythical, aegisthus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters, tragic/mythical, chrysothemis Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters, tragic/mythical, electra Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters, tragic/mythical, hercules/heracles Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters, tragic/mythical, lycus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters, tragic/mythical, polyneices Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
charaktēr(es) Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
constantine i Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
creon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
criterion of truth Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
deidameia (tragic drama) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
democracy and monarchy, debate between theseus and theban herald on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 21
diogenes laertius Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
dionysius i of syracuse Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
dionysus (bacchus) Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
discourse Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
dissoi logoi Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 21
easterling, p. e. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
epagathus (choraules) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
epictetus (philosopher) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
epistemology Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
eupolis (comic poet), androgynoi Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, antiope Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, hypsipyle Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, medea Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, naturalism Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
euripides Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 169; Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
existent economy Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
favorinus, on exile Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
gnomological tradition Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 169
gorgias, encomium of helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 583
gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 583
greek tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
gregory, j. xxi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 408
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 578
heraclitus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
heresy, division/multiplicity of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 153
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
homer Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163; Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 408
intertextuality Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
iphigenia at aulis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 408, 583
irenaeus, heresiological use of simplicity Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 153
julian, emperor, complicated persona of Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
justice Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 30
kuefler, m. Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
language, polyneices on truth and justice, in phoenician women Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 30
language, rhetoric Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 21
law, the Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 153
life of sophocles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
logos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 583
mastronarde, donald Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 30
medea, revenge in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 30
medea, rhetoric and sophia in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 21
menander (comic poet), androgynos Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
menelaus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
monarchy and democracy, debate between theseus and theban herald on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 21
myth Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
naturalism, in tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
oedipus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
on exile Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
oratory Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
orestes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578, 583
papyri, preserving tragedy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
paradox Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
past Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
philo of alexandria Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 153
philosophy Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
philostratus (the younger), citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
phoenician women Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 30
poetry Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
polynices Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 169
praise Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
prodicus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 583
prooimion Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 583
protagoras Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 583; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 21
quotations Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 169
reality Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
revenge, of medea Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 30
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578, 583; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 21
rhêsis/eis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
scripture Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 153
seneca the younger Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 169
sextus empiricus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
simplicity, jewish notion of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 153
simplicity, virtue of simplicity versus heresy Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 153
soldier(y) Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
sophia, wisdom revenge of medea and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 30
sophia, wisdom rhetoric and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 21
sophia, wisdom truth contrasted with justice Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 30
sophists, sophistry Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 169
sophocles, and rhetoric/tragedy as a rhetorical form Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
sophocles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
stobaeus Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 169
stoicism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
suppliant women on rhetoric Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 21
suppliant women theban herald, debate on democracy and monarchy between theseus and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 21
swift, l. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
teichoskopia Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
thebes Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 169
theseus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163
tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 163; Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 169
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578, 583
women in greek culture revenge of medea and' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 30
xenophanes Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 115
zeus Masterson, Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (2016) 72
ἀγάπη Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 153
ἁπλοῦς Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 153