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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5636
Euripides, Phoenician Women, 468


θεῶν γένοιτο καὶ διαλλακτὴς κακῶν.My son Polyneices, speak first, for you have come at the head of a Danaid army, alleging wrongful treatment; may some god be the judge and reconciler of the troubles. Polyneice


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Euripides, Electra, 1001-1010, 1024-1029, 1032, 1035, 1055-1059, 1064, 1071-1073, 1097, 1107, 1118-1119, 1124-1131, 998-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Euripides, Hecuba, 252-295, 251 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 159-164, 158 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Hippolytus, 972, 971 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Medea, 346-347, 475, 515, 522, 546, 324 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 345-356, 396, 403, 469-472, 481-495, 499-558, 344 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 164, 176-179, 188-189, 163 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1001-1059, 860-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. did you ever raise, though Castor was still alive, a vigorous youth, and his brother also, not yet among the stars? Then when you had come to Troy , and the Argives were on your track, and the mortal combat had begun, whenever tidings came to you of
9. Sophocles, Electra, 976-981, 975 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.82.8 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.82.8. The cause of all these evils was the lust for power arising from greed and ambition; and from these passions proceeded the violence of parties once engaged in contention. The leaders in the cities, each provided with the fairest professions, on the one side with the cry of political equality of the people, on the other of a moderate aristocracy, sought prizes for themselves in those public interests which they pretended to cherish, and, recoiling from no means in their struggles for ascendancy, engaged in the direct excesses; in their acts of vengeance they went to even greater lengths, not stopping at what justice or the good of the state demanded, but making the party caprice of the moment their only standard, and invoking with equal readiness the condemnation of an unjust verdict or the authority of the strong arm to glut the animosities of the hour. Thus religion was in honor with neither party; but the use of fair phrases to arrive at guilty ends was in high reputation. Meanwhile the moderate part of the citizens perished between the two, either for not joining in the quarrel, or because envy would not suffer them to escape.
11. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
12. Papyri, P.Oxy., 5203



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides (sophist)\n, citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
aeschylus, dramas by\n, ransom of hector Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
aeschylus, language Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
aristotle, poetics Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
characters, tragic/mythical, aegisthus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters, tragic/mythical, chrysothemis Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters, tragic/mythical, electra Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters, tragic/mythical, hercules/heracles Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters, tragic/mythical, lycus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters, tragic/mythical, polyneices Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
deidameia (tragic drama) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
democracy, in tragedy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 213
dionysius i of syracuse Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
epagathus (choraules) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
epictetus (philosopher) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
eupolis (comic poet), androgynoi Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, antiope Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, archelaus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 213
euripides, dramas by\n, hypsipyle Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, medea Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
euripides, dramas by\n, phoenissae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 213
euripides, naturalism Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
favorinus, on exile Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 578
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
isonomia Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 213
menander (comic poet), androgynos Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
naturalism, in tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
on exile Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
orestes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
papyri, preserving tragedy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
philostratus (the younger), citations of tragedy by Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 170
philotimia Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 213
phoenician women Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
pleonexia (greed) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 213
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
rhêsis/eis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
sophocles, and rhetoric/tragedy as a rhetorical form Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 252
swift, l. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
teichoskopia' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578