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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5636
Euripides, Phoenician Women, 173


ὁ μάντις ̓Αμφιάραος, ὦ δέσποιν', ὅδε:That, lady, is the prophet Amphiaraus; with him are the victims, earth’s bloodthirsty streams. Antigone


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 24.614-24.617 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

24.614. /For nine days' space they lay in their blood, nor was there any to bury them, for the son of Cronos turned the folk to stones; howbeit on the tenth day the gods of heaven buried them; and Niobe bethought her of meat, for she was wearied with the shedding of tears. And now somewhere amid the rocks, on the lonely mountains 24.615. /on Sipylus, where, men say, are the couching-places of goddesses, even of the nymphs that range swiftly in the dance about Achelous, there, albeit a stone, she broodeth over her woes sent by the gods. But come, let us twain likewise, noble old sire, bethink us of meat; and thereafter shalt thou make lament over thy dear son 24.616. /on Sipylus, where, men say, are the couching-places of goddesses, even of the nymphs that range swiftly in the dance about Achelous, there, albeit a stone, she broodeth over her woes sent by the gods. But come, let us twain likewise, noble old sire, bethink us of meat; and thereafter shalt thou make lament over thy dear son 24.617. /on Sipylus, where, men say, are the couching-places of goddesses, even of the nymphs that range swiftly in the dance about Achelous, there, albeit a stone, she broodeth over her woes sent by the gods. But come, let us twain likewise, noble old sire, bethink us of meat; and thereafter shalt thou make lament over thy dear son
2. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1045-1067, 1069-1074, 1082, 1087-1098, 1109-1118, 1138-1150, 1155-1169, 1198-1200, 1246, 1259, 1261-1262, 1299, 1301-1323, 1331-1364, 1044 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1044. οὐδ' οἶδ' οὐδεὶς ἥντιν' ἐρῶσαν πώποτ' ἐποίησα γυναῖκα.
3. Euripides, Alcestis, 142-212, 836, 141 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

141. Yea, I did pity thee most truly, Trojan dame, when thou earnest to this house; but from fear of my mistress I hold my peace, albeit I sympathize with thee
4. Euripides, Andromache, 1101-1113, 1100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1100. ἡμεῖς δὲ μῆλα, φυλλάδος Παρνασίας
5. Euripides, Electra, 1125-1131, 783-789, 1124 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1124. ἤκουσας, οἶμαι, τῶν ἐμῶν λοχευμάτων: 1124. You have heard, I suppose, that I have given birth;
6. Euripides, Hippolytus, 10, 100-102, 1025-1029, 103, 1030-1031, 104-105, 1055-1059, 106, 108-109, 11, 110, 115-119, 1191, 12, 120, 1286-1289, 1298-1299, 13, 1300, 1305-1324, 14, 1415, 15-19, 193-199, 2, 20, 200-201, 21-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-58, 6, 611-612, 657-658, 7, 728-731, 8, 88, 887-889, 89, 890, 9, 90-94, 948-949, 95, 950-957, 96-99, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. Wide o’er man my realm extends, and proud the name that I, the goddess Cypris, bear, both in heaven’s courts and ’mongst all those who dwell within the limits of the sea i.e. the Euxine. and the bounds of Atlas, beholding the sun-god’s light;
7. Euripides, Ion, 1123-1128, 1132, 1168, 226-229, 665, 1122 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1122. Soon as Xuthus, husband of Creusa, had left the god’s prophetic shrine, taking with him his new-found son, to hold the feast and sacrifice that he designed to offer to the gods
8. Euripides, Orestes, 1367-1536, 1539-1540, 1543-1546, 1561-1572, 1598, 1602, 1366 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1366. But the bolts of the palace-doors rattle; be silent; for one of the Phrygians is coming out, from whom we will inquire of the state of matters within. Phrygian
9. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 104-148, 1485-1489, 149, 1490-1499, 150, 1500-1509, 151, 1510-1519, 152, 1520-1529, 153, 1530-1539, 154, 1540-1549, 155, 1550-1559, 156, 1560-1569, 157, 1570-1579, 158, 1580-1581, 159-172, 174-192, 301-354, 74-78, 97, 103 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

103. Stretch out your hand to me from the stairs now, stretch it out, the hand of age to youth
10. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.21.3, 8.2.6-8.2.7, 9.8.4, 9.8.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.21.3. Such were his words. On the South wall, as it is called, of the Acropolis, which faces the theater, there is dedicated a gilded head of Medusa the Gorgon, and round it is wrought an aegis. At the top of the theater is a cave in the rocks under the Acropolis. This also has a tripod over it, wherein are Apollo and Artemis slaying the children of Niobe. This Niobe I myself saw when I had gone up to Mount Sipylus. When you are near it is a beetling crag, with not the slightest resemblance to a woman, mourning or otherwise; but if you go further away you will think you see a woman in tears, with head bowed down. 8.2.6. All through the ages, many events that have occurred in the past, and even some that occur to-day, have been generally discredited because of the lies built up on a foundation of fact. It is said, for instance, that ever since the time of Lycaon a man has changed into a wolf at the sacrifice to Lycaean Zeus, but that the change is not for life; if, when he is a wolf, he abstains from human flesh, after nine years he becomes a man again, but if he tastes human flesh he remains a beast for ever. 8.2.7. Similarly too it is said that Niobe on Mount Sipylus sheds tears in the season of summer. I have also heard that the griffins have spots like the leopard, and that the Tritons speak with human voice, though others say that they blow through a shell that has been bored. Those who like to listen to the miraculous are themselves apt to add to the marvel, and so they ruin truth by mixing it with falsehood. 9.8.4. In the circuit of the ancient wall of Thebes were gates seven in number, and these remain to-day. One got its name, I learned, from Electra, the sister of Cadmus, and another, the Proetidian, from a native of Thebes . He was Proetus, but I found it difficult to discover his date and lineage. The Neistan gate, they say, got its name for the following reason. The last of the harp's strings they call nete, and Amphion invented it, they say, at this gate. I have also heard that the son of Zethus, the brother of Amphion, was named Neis, and that after him was this gate called. 9.8.6. The name Homoloid is derived, they say, from the following circumstance. When the Thebans were beaten in battle by the Argives near Glisas, most of them withdrew along with Laodamas, the son of Eteocles. A portion of them shrank from the journey to Illyria, and turning aside to Thessaly they seized Homole, the most fertile and best-watered of the Thessalian mountains.
11. Philostratus, Pictures, 1.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, and music in tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
agamemnon, seven against thebes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
antigone de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 206, 209
aphrodite Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
arcadia Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
athens Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
audience de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 206
characters, minor Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
characters, tragic/mythical, antigone Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
characters, tragic/mythical, electra Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
chauvinism Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
chorostatas (kho-), in postclassical tragic plays/performances Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
citharode /citharodic performances Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
curses Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
cyrene, dance, in drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
deictic pronouns de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 206, 209
deixis de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 206, 209
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 829
dialogue, in drama de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 206
dithyramb/dithyrambic choruses/contests Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
emotional distance de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 206, 209
emotional proximity de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 206, 209
emotions, fear (fright) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 206
euripides, and music Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
homer Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343, 915
ion Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
kyriakou, p. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
musical notation in papyri Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
myth, infrastructures for Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
new comedy, new music Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
niobe Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
niobids, the Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
oaths Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
orestes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
pausanias, biography Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
pausanias, judges mythic authenticity Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
pelops Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
philostratos Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
philoxenus, dithyrambic poet Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
phoenician women Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
playwrights, comedy (greek), aristophanes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
replicas, replication Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
sacrifice Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
sipylos, mt Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
sophocles, and music/song Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
space, (spatial) standpoint de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 206, 209
swift, l. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
teichoscopy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 206, 209
teichoskopia' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 343
teichoskopia Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
thebes, seven gates of Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6
timotheus of miletus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
tragedy Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 6