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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5636
Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1486-1529


ἁβρὰ παρηίδος οὐδ' ὑπὸ παρθενί-I do not veil my tender cheek shaded with curls, nor do I feel shame, from maiden modesty, at the dark red beneath my eyes, the blush upon my face, as I hurry on, in bacchic revelry for the dead


nanI do not veil my tender cheek shaded with curls, nor do I feel shame, from maiden modesty, at the dark red beneath my eyes, the blush upon my face, as I hurry on, in bacchic revelry for the dead


ας τὸν ὑπὸ βλεφάροις φοίνικ', ἐρύθημα προσώπουI do not veil my tender cheek shaded with curls, nor do I feel shame, from maiden modesty, at the dark red beneath my eyes, the blush upon my face, as I hurry on, in bacchic revelry for the dead


αἰδομένα φέρομαι βάκχα νεκύ-I do not veil my tender cheek shaded with curls, nor do I feel shame, from maiden modesty, at the dark red beneath my eyes, the blush upon my face, as I hurry on, in bacchic revelry for the dead


ων, κράδεμνα δικοῦσα κόμας ἀπ' ἐ-casting from my hair its mantle and letting my delicate saffron robe fly loose, a tearful escort to the dead. Ah me!


μᾶς, στολίδος κροκόεσσαν ἀνεῖσα τρυφάνcasting from my hair its mantle and letting my delicate saffron robe fly loose, a tearful escort to the dead. Ah me!


ἁγεμόνευμα νεκροῖσι πολύστονον. αἰαῖ, ἰώ μοι.casting from my hair its mantle and letting my delicate saffron robe fly loose, a tearful escort to the dead. Ah me!


ὦ Πολύνεικες, ἔφυς ἄρ' ἐπώνυμος: ὤμοι μοι, Θῆβαι:Oh, Polyneices! you were rightly named, after all; woe to you, Thebes !


nanOh, Polyneices! you were rightly named, after all; woe to you, Thebes !


σὰ δ' ἔρις — οὐκ ἔρις, ἀλλὰ φόνῳ φόνος —Your strife—not strife, but murder on murder— has brought the house of Oedipus to ruin with dire and grim bloodshed. What harmonious or tuneful wailing can I summon


Οἰδιπόδα δόμον ὤλεσε κρανθεῖς'Your strife—not strife, but murder on murder— has brought the house of Oedipus to ruin with dire and grim bloodshed. What harmonious or tuneful wailing can I summon


αἵματι δεινῷ, αἵματι λυγρῷ.Your strife—not strife, but murder on murder— has brought the house of Oedipus to ruin with dire and grim bloodshed. What harmonious or tuneful wailing can I summon


τίνα προσῳδὸνYour strife—not strife, but murder on murder— has brought the house of Oedipus to ruin with dire and grim bloodshed. What harmonious or tuneful wailing can I summon


ἢ τίνα μουσοπόλον στοναχὰν ἐπὶYour strife—not strife, but murder on murder— has brought the house of Oedipus to ruin with dire and grim bloodshed. What harmonious or tuneful wailing can I summon


δάκρυσι δάκρυσιν, ὦ δόμος, ὦ δόμοςfor my tears, my tears, oh, my home! oh, my home! as I bear these three kindred bodies, my mother and her sons, a welcome sight to the Fury? She destroyed the house of Oedipus, root and branch


ἀγκαλέσωμαιfor my tears, my tears, oh, my home! oh, my home! as I bear these three kindred bodies, my mother and her sons, a welcome sight to the Fury? She destroyed the house of Oedipus, root and branch


τρισσὰ φέρουσα τάδ' αἵματα σύγγοναfor my tears, my tears, oh, my home! oh, my home! as I bear these three kindred bodies, my mother and her sons, a welcome sight to the Fury? She destroyed the house of Oedipus, root and branch


ματέρα καὶ τέκνα, χάρματ' ̓Ερινύος;for my tears, my tears, oh, my home! oh, my home! as I bear these three kindred bodies, my mother and her sons, a welcome sight to the Fury? She destroyed the house of Oedipus, root and branch


ἃ δόμον Οἰδιπόδα πρόπαν ὤλεσεfor my tears, my tears, oh, my home! oh, my home! as I bear these three kindred bodies, my mother and her sons, a welcome sight to the Fury? She destroyed the house of Oedipus, root and branch


τᾶς ἀγρίας ὅτεwhen his shrewdness solved the Sphinx’s unsolvable song and killed that savage singer. Alas for you, father! What other Hellene or barbarian


δυσξυνέτου ξυνετὸν μέλος ἔγνωwhen his shrewdness solved the Sphinx’s unsolvable song and killed that savage singer. Alas for you, father! What other Hellene or barbarian


Σφιγγὸς ἀοιδοῦ σῶμα φονεύσας.when his shrewdness solved the Sphinx’s unsolvable song and killed that savage singer. Alas for you, father! What other Hellene or barbarian


ἰώ μοί μοι, πάτερwhen his shrewdness solved the Sphinx’s unsolvable song and killed that savage singer. Alas for you, father! What other Hellene or barbarian


τίς ̔Ελλὰς ἢ βάρβαρος ἢwhen his shrewdness solved the Sphinx’s unsolvable song and killed that savage singer. Alas for you, father! What other Hellene or barbarian


τῶν προπάροιθ' εὐγενετᾶνwhat mortal from a noble line ever endured the anguish of such visible afflictions?


ἕτερος ἔτλα κακῶν τοσῶνδ'what mortal from a noble line ever endured the anguish of such visible afflictions?


αἵματος ἁμερίουwhat mortal from a noble line ever endured the anguish of such visible afflictions?


τοιάδ' ἄχεα φανερά;what mortal from a noble line ever endured the anguish of such visible afflictions?


τάλαιν', ὡς ἐλελίζει —Ah! poor girl, how piteous is your cry!


τίς ἄρ' ὄρνις, ἢ δρυὸς ἢWhat bird, perched on the high-leaved branches of oak or pine, will come to mourn with me, left motherless? With cries of woe


ἐλάτας ἀκροκόμοις ἀμφὶ κλάδοις ἑζομέναWhat bird, perched on the high-leaved branches of oak or pine, will come to mourn with me, left motherless? With cries of woe


μονομάτορσιν ὀδυρμοῖςWhat bird, perched on the high-leaved branches of oak or pine, will come to mourn with me, left motherless? With cries of woe


ἐμοῖς ἄχεσι συνῳδός;What bird, perched on the high-leaved branches of oak or pine, will come to mourn with me, left motherless? With cries of woe


αἴλινον αἰάγμασιν ἃWhat bird, perched on the high-leaved branches of oak or pine, will come to mourn with me, left motherless? With cries of woe


τοῖσδε προκλαίω μονάδ' αἰ-I lament before it comes the piteous lonely life, that I shall live for the rest of time, in streaming tears. On which of these


ῶνα διάξουσα τὸν αἰεὶ χρόνον ἐνI lament before it comes the piteous lonely life, that I shall live for the rest of time, in streaming tears. On which of these


λειβομένοισιν δάκρυσιν ἰαχήσω.I lament before it comes the piteous lonely life, that I shall live for the rest of time, in streaming tears. On which of these


nanI lament before it comes the piteous lonely life, that I shall live for the rest of time, in streaming tears. On which of these


τίν' ἐπὶ πρῶτον ἀπὸ χαί-I lament before it comes the piteous lonely life, that I shall live for the rest of time, in streaming tears. On which of these


τας σπαραγμοῖς ἀπαρχὰς βάλω;hall I throw my offerings first, plucking the hair from my head? on the breast of the mother that suckled me, or beside the ghastly death-wounds of my brothers’ corpses?


ματρὸς ἐμᾶς ἢ διδύμοι-hall I throw my offerings first, plucking the hair from my head? on the breast of the mother that suckled me, or beside the ghastly death-wounds of my brothers’ corpses?


σι γάλακτος παρὰ μαστοῖςhall I throw my offerings first, plucking the hair from my head? on the breast of the mother that suckled me, or beside the ghastly death-wounds of my brothers’ corpses?


ἢ πρὸς ἀδελ-hall I throw my offerings first, plucking the hair from my head? on the breast of the mother that suckled me, or beside the ghastly death-wounds of my brothers’ corpses?


φῶν οὐλόμεν' αἰκίσματα νεκρῶν;hall I throw my offerings first, plucking the hair from my head? on the breast of the mother that suckled me, or beside the ghastly death-wounds of my brothers’ corpses?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1045-1067, 1069-1074, 1082, 1087-1098, 1109-1118, 1138-1150, 1155-1169, 1198-1200, 1246, 1259, 1261-1262, 1299, 1301-1323, 1331-1364, 1044 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1044. οὐδ' οἶδ' οὐδεὶς ἥντιν' ἐρῶσαν πώποτ' ἐποίησα γυναῖκα.
2. Euripides, Alcestis, 426-429, 611-612, 614-635, 743-744, 862-863, 866-867, 869-871, 897-902, 911, 916-919, 922, 926-928, 425 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

425. Ho! sirrahs, catch me this woman; hold her fast; for ’tis no welcome story she will have to hear. It was to make thee leave the holy altar of the goddess that I held thy child’s death before thy eyes, and so induced thee to give thyself up to me to die.
3. Euripides, Andromache, 1117-1172, 1176, 1187, 1211, 1218, 1226-1242, 1263-1270, 1116 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1116. εἷς ἦν ἁπάντων τῶνδε μηχανορράφος.
4. Euripides, Bacchae, 1217-1226, 1285, 1300-1329, 1216 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1216. ἕπεσθέ μοι φέροντες ἄθλιον βάρος 1216. Follow me, carrying the miserable burden of Pentheus, follow me, slaves, before the house; exhausted from countless searches, I am bringing his body, for I discovered it in the folds of Kithairon
5. Euripides, Electra, 1277-1280, 1276 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1276. σοὶ μὲν τάδ' εἶπον: τόνδε δ' Αἰγίσθου νέκυν
6. Euripides, Hecuba, 1288, 25-50, 610, 616, 675, 678-680, 684-732, 894-897, 1287 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1287. ̔Εκάβη, σὺ δ', ὦ τάλαινα, διπτύχους νεκροὺς
7. Euripides, Helen, 1243, 1260, 1291-1368, 1390-1395, 1400, 1408, 1419, 1528, 1542-1604, 224, 666, 690, 1240 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1240. τί δ'; ἔστ' ἀπόντων τύμβος; ἢ θάψεις σκιάν; 1240. What? Is there a tomb for the absent? Or will you bury a shadow? Helen
8. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 1027-1045, 1159-1162, 1026 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1026. rend= Bury my body after death in its destined grave in front of the shrine of the virgin goddess Pallas. at Pallene. And I will be thy friend and guardian of thy city for ever, where I lie buried in a foreign soil, but a bitter foe to these children’s descendants, whensoe’er Referring to invasions by the Peloponnesians, descendants of the Heracleidae. with gathered host they come against this land, traitors to your kindness now; such are the strangers ye have championed. Why then came I hither, if I knew all this, instead of regarding the god’s oracle? Because I thought, that Hera was mightier far than any oracle, and would not betray me. Waste no drink-offering on my tomb, nor spill the victim’s blood; for I will requite them for my treatment here with a journey they shall rue; and ye shall have double gain from me, for I will help you and harm them by my death. Alcmena 1026. Slay me, I do not ask thee for mercy; yet since this city let me go and shrunk from slaying me, I will reward it with an old oracle of Loxias, which in time will benefit them more than doth appear.
9. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1359-1366, 1358 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Medea, 1378-1383, 1377 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1377. Give up to me those dead, to bury and lament Medea
11. Euripides, Orestes, 1366-1536, 1539-1540, 1543-1546, 1561-1572, 1598, 1602, 97-99, 114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 104-148, 1485, 1487-1489, 149, 1490-1499, 150, 1500-1509, 151, 1510-1519, 152, 1520-1529, 153, 1530-1539, 154, 1540-1549, 155, 1550-1559, 156, 1560-1569, 157, 1570-1579, 158, 1580-1581, 159-192, 301-354, 103 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

103. Stretch out your hand to me from the stairs now, stretch it out, the hand of age to youth
13. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 755-759, 778-836, 841-843, 846-931, 934-935, 950-954, 754 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

754. Are ye bringing the bodies, for the which the strife arose? Messenger
14. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1134-1146, 1156-1206, 1240-1245, 1248-1250, 735-739, 1133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, and music in tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
aeschylus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 557
aesthetics of embodiment Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 764
aetiology Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
andromakhe Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 18
antigone, as maenad Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 18
aristophanes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 557
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
battezzato, l. xviii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 557
characters, tragic/mythical, antigone Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
characters, tragic/mythical, electra Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
chorostatas (kho-), in postclassical tragic plays/performances Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
citharode /citharodic performances Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
cyrene, dance, in drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 344, 353
dithyramb/dithyrambic choruses/contests Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
euripides, and music Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
funerals Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
iphigenia in tauris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
language Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 557
makarismos Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 18
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
musical notation in papyri Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
mêchanê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
new comedy, new music Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
nomos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
orestes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 557
philoxenus, dithyrambic poet Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
phoenician women Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 344, 353
playwrights, comedy (greek), aristophanes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
sexuality Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 353
sophocles, and music/song Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
sophocles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 557
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
swift, l. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 344, 353
timotheus of miletus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 229
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 764, 834
vocabulary Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 557
weddings' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
worman, n. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 764