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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5630
Euripides, Medea, 803-806


οὔτ' ἐξ ἐμοῦ γὰρ παῖδας ὄψεταί ποτεΟ, I did wrong, that hour I left my father’s home, persuaded by that Hellene’s words, who now shall pay the penalty, so help me God. Never shall he see again alive the children I bore to him


ζῶντας τὸ λοιπὸν οὔτε τῆς νεοζύγουΟ, I did wrong, that hour I left my father’s home, persuaded by that Hellene’s words, who now shall pay the penalty, so help me God. Never shall he see again alive the children I bore to him


νύμφης τεκνώσει παῖδ', ἐπεὶ κακὴν κακῶςnor from his new bride shall he beget issue, for she must die a hideous death, slain by my drugs. Let no one deem me a poor weak woman who sits with folded hands, but of another mould, dangerous to foes and well-disposed to friends;


θανεῖν σφ' ἀνάγκη τοῖς ἐμοῖσι φαρμάκοις.nor from his new bride shall he beget issue, for she must die a hideous death, slain by my drugs. Let no one deem me a poor weak woman who sits with folded hands, but of another mould, dangerous to foes and well-disposed to friends;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 2-8, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. πρῶτον μὲν εὐχῇ τῇδε πρεσβεύω θεῶν 1. First, in this prayer of mine, I give the place of highest honor among the gods to the first prophet, Earth; and after her to Themis, for she was the second to take this oracular seat of her mother, as legend tells.
2. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1026-1031, 1025 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1025. Now by Zeus, the god of oaths, and by the earth, whereon we stand, I swear to thee I never did lay hand upon thy wife nor would have wished to, or have harboured such a thought Slay me, ye gods! rob me of name and honour, from home and city cast me forth, a wandering exile o’er the earth!
3. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 750-752, 535 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Medea, 1056-1080, 109, 112-113, 1136-1139, 114, 1140-1189, 119, 1190-1199, 120, 1200-1209, 121, 1210-1230, 1234-1250, 1317-1414, 144-145, 148-153, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-172, 18-19, 190-199, 20, 200-203, 208-209, 21, 210, 214-215, 22, 225, 23, 230-251, 255-256, 259-266, 285-286, 305, 316, 324, 345, 348, 351-354, 368, 378-380, 389, 39, 390-391, 395-398, 40, 401-439, 44, 440-575, 625-641, 643, 663-802, 804-823, 825, 835-855, 9-10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. to slay their father and come to live here in the land of Corinth with her husband and children, where her exile found favour with the citizens to whose land she had come, and in all things of her own accord was she at one with Jason, the greatest safeguard thi
5. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1040, 1189, 1193-1201, 1220-1229, 383-384, 808-809, 818-820, 1039 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1039. Heal this pain with which your godless mother has enraged me! So may I see her fall to ruin, exactly, just exactly, as she has destroyed me!
6. Strabo, Geography, 8.6.22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.6.22. The beginning of the seaboard on the two sides is, on the one side, Lechaion, and, on the other, Cenchreae, a village and a harbor distant about seventy stadia from Corinth. Now this latter they use for the trade from Asia, but Lechaion for that from Italy. Lechaion lies beneath the city, and does not contain many residences; but long walls about twelve stadia in length have been built on both sides of the road that leads to Lechaion. The shore that extends from here to Pagae in Megaris is washed by the Corinthian Gulf; it is concave, and with the shore on the other side, at Schoenus, which is near Cenchreae, it forms the Diolcus. In the interval between Lechaion and Pagae there used to be, in early times, the oracle of the Acraean Hera; and here, too, is Olmiae, the promontory that forms the gulf in which are situated Oinoe and Pagae, the latter a stronghold of the Megarians and Oinoe of the Corinthians. From Cenchreae one comes to Schoenus, where is the narrow part of the isthmus, I mean the Diolcus; and then one comes to Crommyonia. off this shore lie the Saronic and Eleusinian Gulfs, which in a way are the same, and border on the Hermionic Gulf. On the Isthmus is also the sanctuary of the Isthmian Poseidon, in the shade of a grove of pinetrees, where the Corinthians used to celebrate the Isthmian Games. Crommyon is a village in Corinthia, though in earlier times it was in Megaris; and in it is laid the scene of the myth of the Crommyonian sow, which, it is said, was the mother of the Calydonian Boar; and, according to tradition, the destruction of this sow was one of the labors of Theseus. Tenea, also, is in Corinthia, and in it is a sanctuary of the Teneatan Apollo; and it is said that most of the colonists who accompanied Archias, the leader of the colonists to Syracuse, set out from there, and that afterwards Tenea prospered more than the other settlements, and finally even had a government of its own, and, revolting from the Corinthians, joined the Romans, and endured after the destruction of Corinth. And mention is also made of an oracle that was given to a certain man from Asia, who enquired whether it was better to change his home to Corinth: Blest is Corinth, but Tenea for me. But in ignorance some pervert this as follows: but Tegea for me! And it is said that Polybus reared Oidipus here. And it seems, also, that there is a kinship between the peoples of Tenedos and Tenea, through Tennes the son of Cycnus, as Aristotle says; and the similarity in the worship of Apollo among the two peoples affords strong indications of such kinship.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegeus Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 57
aegeus and medea Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
aigeus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
apollo Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
argo Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 57
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69, 78
chance, in delphic divination Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
chorus, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
colchis Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 57
dedications Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
deianeira Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
epidauros limera Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
glauce (medea) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
hera akraia Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
hyllus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
ino Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
interpretation, of attic drinking cup Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
iolcus Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 57
iole (trachiniae) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
iphigeneia Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
jason Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 57
jason (medea), curses by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
kelly, a. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69, 74, 78
lichas (trachiniae) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
lots, beans Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
lots, pythias use of Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
lots, stones Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
lots, themis and Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
medea, and jasons perjury Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
medea, oath with aegeus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
medea Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 57; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69, 74, 78
metamorphosis Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 57
oaths Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69
odysseus, curses against Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
orestes Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
palici, sicily Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
pelias, daughters of Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 57
perachora Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
pythia, lots in a phialē Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
pythia Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
revenge curses Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
rückblickszenen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 74
skênê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69
themis Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
trees, laurel' Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 113
zuntz, günther Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 57