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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5630
Euripides, Medea, 546


ἔλεξ': ἅμιλλαν γὰρ σὺ προύθηκας λόγων.So much I say to thee about my own toils, for ’twas thou didst challenge me to this retort. As for the taunts thou urgest against my marriage with the princess, I will prove to thee, first, that I am prudent herein, next chastened in my love, and last a powerful friend


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 24.677-24.694 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

24.677. /but Achilles slept in the innermost part of the well-builded hut, and by his side lay fair-cheeked Briseis. 24.678. /but Achilles slept in the innermost part of the well-builded hut, and by his side lay fair-cheeked Briseis. 24.679. /but Achilles slept in the innermost part of the well-builded hut, and by his side lay fair-cheeked Briseis. Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, overcome of soft sleep; but not upon the helper Hermes might sleep lay hold 24.680. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.681. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.682. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.683. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.684. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.685. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.686. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.687. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.688. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.689. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.690. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.691. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.692. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.693. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.694. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus
2. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 66 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

66. He took the hollow lyre which he placed
3. Euripides, Cyclops, 317-346, 316 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

316. ὁ πλοῦτος, ἀνθρωπίσκε, τοῖς σοφοῖς θεός 316. Wealth, manikin, is the god for the wise; all else is mere vaunting and fine words. Plague take the headlands by the sea, on which my father seats himself! Why hast thou put forward these arguments?
4. Euripides, Electra, 1001-1010, 1024-1029, 1032, 1035, 1055-1059, 1064, 1071-1073, 1097, 1107, 1118-1119, 1124-1131, 998-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Hecuba, 252-295, 807-808, 814-819, 251 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Hippolytus, 972, 971 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Medea, 109, 112-114, 119-121, 144-145, 148-153, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-172, 18-19, 190-199, 20, 200-203, 208-209, 21, 210, 214-215, 22, 225, 23, 230-251, 255-256, 259-266, 285-286, 305, 316, 324, 345-348, 351-354, 39-40, 410-439, 44, 440-545, 547-583, 586-587, 591-592, 595-599, 610-613, 619-620, 625-641, 643, 665-758, 764-810, 9-10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. to slay their father and come to live here in the land of Corinth with her husband and children, where her exile found favour with the citizens to whose land she had come, and in all things of her own accord was she at one with Jason, the greatest safeguard thi
8. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 469-472, 481-495, 499-503, 524-525, 468 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 164, 176-179, 188-189, 428, 163 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1001-1059, 860-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. did you ever raise, though Castor was still alive, a vigorous youth, and his brother also, not yet among the stars? Then when you had come to Troy , and the Argives were on your track, and the mortal combat had begun, whenever tidings came to you of
11. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.37-3.38 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.304-4.392, 4.433, 4.553-4.570 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.304. receiving fertile coastland for her farms 4.305. by hospitable grant! She dares disdain 4.306. our proffered nuptial vow. She has proclaimed 4.307. Aeneas partner of her bed and throne. 4.308. And now that Paris, with his eunuch crew 4.309. beneath his chin and fragrant, oozy hair 4.310. ties the soft Lydian bonnet, boasting well 4.311. his stolen prize. But we to all these fanes 4.312. though they be thine, a fruitless offering bring 4.314. As thus he prayed and to the altars clung 4.315. th' Omnipotent gave ear, and turned his gaze 4.316. upon the royal dwelling, where for love 4.317. the amorous pair forgot their place and name. 4.318. Then thus to Mercury he gave command: 4.319. “Haste thee, my son, upon the Zephyrs call 4.320. and take thy winged way! My mandate bear 4.321. unto that prince of Troy who tarries now 4.322. in Tyrian Carthage, heedless utterly 4.323. of empire Heaven-bestowed. On winged winds 4.324. hasten with my decrees. Not such the man 4.325. his beauteous mother promised; not for this 4.326. twice did she shield him from the Greeks in arms: 4.327. but that he might rule Italy, a land 4.328. pregt with thrones and echoing with war; 4.329. that he of Teucer's seed a race should sire 4.330. and bring beneath its law the whole wide world. 4.331. If such a glory and event supreme 4.332. enkindle not his bosom; if such task 4.333. to his own honor speak not; can the sire 4.334. begrudge Ascanius the heritage 4.335. of the proud name of Rome ? What plans he now? 4.336. What mad hope bids him linger in the lap 4.337. of enemies, considering no more 4.338. the land Lavinian and Ausonia's sons. 4.339. Let him to sea! Be this our final word: 4.341. He spoke. The god a prompt obedience gave 4.342. to his great sire's command. He fastened first 4.343. those sandals of bright gold, which carry him 4.344. aloft o'er land or sea, with airy wings 4.345. that race the fleeting wind; then lifted he 4.346. his wand, wherewith he summons from the grave 4.347. pale-featured ghosts, or, if he will, consigns 4.348. to doleful Tartarus; or by its power 4.349. gives slumber or dispels; or quite unseals 4.350. the eyelids of the dead: on this relying 4.351. he routs the winds or cleaves th' obscurity 4.352. of stormful clouds. Soon from his flight he spied 4.353. the summit and the sides precipitous 4.354. of stubborn Atlas, whose star-pointing peak 4.355. props heaven; of Atlas, whose pine-wreathed brow 4.356. is girdled evermore with misty gloom 4.357. and lashed of wind and rain; a cloak of snow 4.358. melts on his shoulder; from his aged chin 4.359. drop rivers, and ensheathed in stiffening ice 4.360. glitters his great grim beard. Here first was stayed 4.361. the speed of Mercury's well-poising wing; 4.362. here making pause, from hence he headlong flung 4.363. his body to the sea; in motion like 4.364. ome sea-bird's, which along the levelled shore 4.365. or round tall crags where rove the swarming fish 4.366. flies Iow along the waves: o'er-hovering so 4.367. between the earth and skies, Cyllene's god 4.368. flew downward from his mother's mountain-sire 4.369. parted the winds and skimmed the sandy merge 4.370. of Libya . When first his winged feet 4.371. came nigh the clay-built Punic huts, he saw 4.372. Aeneas building at a citadel 4.373. and founding walls and towers; at his side 4.374. was girt a blade with yellow jaspers starred 4.375. his mantle with the stain of Tyrian shell 4.376. flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair 4.377. by opulent Dido with fine threads of gold 4.378. her gift of love; straightway the god began: 4.379. “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build 4.380. foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall 4.381. build her proud city? Hast thou, shameful loss! 4.382. Forgot thy kingdom and thy task sublime? 4.383. From bright Olympus, I. He who commands 4.384. all gods, and by his sovran deity 4.385. moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade 4.386. me bear on winged winds his high decree. 4.387. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou 4.388. linger so Iong in lap of Libyan land? 4.389. If the proud reward of thy destined way 4.390. move not thy heart, if all the arduous toil 4.391. to thine own honor speak not, Iook upon 4.392. Iulus in his bloom, thy hope and heir 4.433. out of my kingdom? Did our mutual joy 4.553. though yearning sore to remedy and soothe 4.554. uch misery, and with the timely word 4.555. her grief assuage, and though his burdened heart 4.556. was weak because of love, while many a groan 4.557. rose from his bosom, yet no whit did fail 4.558. to do the will of Heaven, but of his fleet 4.559. resumed command. The Trojans on the shore 4.560. ply well their task and push into the sea 4.561. the lofty ships. Now floats the shining keel 4.562. and oars they bring all leafy from the grove 4.563. with oak half-hewn, so hurried was the flight. 4.564. Behold them how they haste—from every gate 4.565. forth-streaming!—just as when a heap of corn 4.566. is thronged with ants, who, knowing winter nigh 4.567. refill their granaries; the long black line 4.568. runs o'er the levels, and conveys the spoil 4.569. in narrow pathway through the grass; a part 4.570. with straining and assiduous shoulder push


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 122
aeetes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
aeneas Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
apollonius Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
aristotle, poetics Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69
calypso Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
carthage Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
carthaginians, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 122
carthaginians, portrait of Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 122
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 596
dido Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
dissoi logoi Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 23
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
euripides Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 596
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
hermes, dolios/patron of tricks Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
kelly, a. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69
language, rhetoric Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 23
medea, rhetoric and sophia in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 23
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
mercury/hermes, in vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
oaths Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578, 596
pragmatics Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 596
priam Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578, 596; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 23
rhêsis/eis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
skênê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69
sophia, wisdom rhetoric and' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 23
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 578
vergil, aeneid Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
wilamowitz-moellendorff, ulrich von Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 23