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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5630
Euripides, Medea, 446-583


οὐ νῦν κατεῖδον πρῶτον ἀλλὰ πολλάκιςIt is not now I first remark, but oft ere this, how unruly a pest is a harsh temper. For instance, thou, hadst thou but patiently endured the will of thy superiors, mightest have remained here in this land and house


τραχεῖαν ὀργὴν ὡς ἀμήχανον κακόν.It is not now I first remark, but oft ere this, how unruly a pest is a harsh temper. For instance, thou, hadst thou but patiently endured the will of thy superiors, mightest have remained here in this land and house


σοὶ γὰρ παρὸν γῆν τήνδε καὶ δόμους ἔχεινIt is not now I first remark, but oft ere this, how unruly a pest is a harsh temper. For instance, thou, hadst thou but patiently endured the will of thy superiors, mightest have remained here in this land and house


κούφως φερούσῃ κρεισσόνων βουλεύματαIt is not now I first remark, but oft ere this, how unruly a pest is a harsh temper. For instance, thou, hadst thou but patiently endured the will of thy superiors, mightest have remained here in this land and house


λόγων ματαίων οὕνεκ' ἐκπεσῇ χθονός.but now for thy idle words wilt thou be banished. Thy words are naught to roe. Cease not to call Jason basest of men; but for those words thou hast spoken against our rulers, count it all gain that exile is thy only punishment.


κἀμοὶ μὲν οὐδὲν πρᾶγμα: μὴ παύσῃ ποτὲbut now for thy idle words wilt thou be banished. Thy words are naught to roe. Cease not to call Jason basest of men; but for those words thou hast spoken against our rulers, count it all gain that exile is thy only punishment.


λέγους' ̓Ιάσον' ὡς κάκιστός ἐστ' ἀνήρ.but now for thy idle words wilt thou be banished. Thy words are naught to roe. Cease not to call Jason basest of men; but for those words thou hast spoken against our rulers, count it all gain that exile is thy only punishment.


ἃ δ' ἐς τυράννους ἐστί σοι λελεγμέναbut now for thy idle words wilt thou be banished. Thy words are naught to roe. Cease not to call Jason basest of men; but for those words thou hast spoken against our rulers, count it all gain that exile is thy only punishment.


πᾶν κέρδος ἡγοῦ ζημιουμένη φυγῇ.but now for thy idle words wilt thou be banished. Thy words are naught to roe. Cease not to call Jason basest of men; but for those words thou hast spoken against our rulers, count it all gain that exile is thy only punishment.


κἀγὼ μὲν αἰεὶ βασιλέων θυμουμένωνI ever tried to check the outbursts of the angry monarch, and would have had thee stay, but thou wouldst not forego thy silly rage, always reviling our rulers, and so thou wilt be banished. Yet even after all this I weary not of my goodwill


ὀργὰς ἀφῄρουν καί ς' ἐβουλόμην μένειν:I ever tried to check the outbursts of the angry monarch, and would have had thee stay, but thou wouldst not forego thy silly rage, always reviling our rulers, and so thou wilt be banished. Yet even after all this I weary not of my goodwill


σὺ δ' οὐκ ἀνίεις μωρίας, λέγους' ἀεὶI ever tried to check the outbursts of the angry monarch, and would have had thee stay, but thou wouldst not forego thy silly rage, always reviling our rulers, and so thou wilt be banished. Yet even after all this I weary not of my goodwill


κακῶς τυράννους: τοιγὰρ ἐκπεσῇ χθονός.I ever tried to check the outbursts of the angry monarch, and would have had thee stay, but thou wouldst not forego thy silly rage, always reviling our rulers, and so thou wilt be banished. Yet even after all this I weary not of my goodwill


ὅμως δὲ κἀκ τῶνδ' οὐκ ἀπειρηκὼς φίλοιςI ever tried to check the outbursts of the angry monarch, and would have had thee stay, but thou wouldst not forego thy silly rage, always reviling our rulers, and so thou wilt be banished. Yet even after all this I weary not of my goodwill


ἥκω, τὸ σὸν δὲ προσκοπούμενος, γύναιbut am come with thus much forethought, lady, that thou mayst not be destitute nor want for aught, when, with thy sons, thou art cast out. Many an evil doth exile bring in its train with it; for even though thou hatest me, never will I harbour hard thoughts of thee. Medea


ὡς μήτ' ἀχρήμων σὺν τέκνοισιν ἐκπέσῃςbut am come with thus much forethought, lady, that thou mayst not be destitute nor want for aught, when, with thy sons, thou art cast out. Many an evil doth exile bring in its train with it; for even though thou hatest me, never will I harbour hard thoughts of thee. Medea


μήτ' ἐνδεής του: πόλλ' ἐφέλκεται φυγὴbut am come with thus much forethought, lady, that thou mayst not be destitute nor want for aught, when, with thy sons, thou art cast out. Many an evil doth exile bring in its train with it; for even though thou hatest me, never will I harbour hard thoughts of thee. Medea


κακὰ ξὺν αὑτῇ. καὶ γὰρ εἰ σύ με στυγεῖςbut am come with thus much forethought, lady, that thou mayst not be destitute nor want for aught, when, with thy sons, thou art cast out. Many an evil doth exile bring in its train with it; for even though thou hatest me, never will I harbour hard thoughts of thee. Medea


οὐκ ἂν δυναίμην σοὶ κακῶς φρονεῖν ποτε.but am come with thus much forethought, lady, that thou mayst not be destitute nor want for aught, when, with thy sons, thou art cast out. Many an evil doth exile bring in its train with it; for even though thou hatest me, never will I harbour hard thoughts of thee. Medea


ὦ παγκάκιστε, τοῦτο γάρ ς' εἰπεῖν ἔχωThou craven villain (for that is the only name my tongue can find for thee, a foul reproach on thy unmanliness)! comest thou to me, thou, most hated foe of gods, of me, and of all mankind? Tis no proof of courage or hardihood


γλώσσῃ μέγιστον εἰς ἀνανδρίαν κακόνThou craven villain (for that is the only name my tongue can find for thee, a foul reproach on thy unmanliness)! comest thou to me, thou, most hated foe of gods, of me, and of all mankind? Tis no proof of courage or hardihood


ἦλθες πρὸς ἡμᾶς, ἦλθες ἔχθιστος γεγώςThou craven villain (for that is the only name my tongue can find for thee, a foul reproach on thy unmanliness)! comest thou to me, thou, most hated foe of gods, of me, and of all mankind? Tis no proof of courage or hardihood


[θεοῖς τε κἀμοὶ παντί τ' ἀνθρώπων γένει];Thou craven villain (for that is the only name my tongue can find for thee, a foul reproach on thy unmanliness)! comest thou to me, thou, most hated foe of gods, of me, and of all mankind? Tis no proof of courage or hardihood


οὔτοι θράσος τόδ' ἐστὶν οὐδ' εὐτολμίαThou craven villain (for that is the only name my tongue can find for thee, a foul reproach on thy unmanliness)! comest thou to me, thou, most hated foe of gods, of me, and of all mankind? Tis no proof of courage or hardihood


φίλους κακῶς δράσαντ' ἐναντίον βλέπεινto confront thy friends after injuring them, but that worst of all human diseases—loss of shame. Yet hast thou done well to come; for I shall ease ray soul by reviling thee, and thou wilt be vexed at my recital.


ἀλλ' ἡ μεγίστη τῶν ἐν ἀνθρώποις νόσωνto confront thy friends after injuring them, but that worst of all human diseases—loss of shame. Yet hast thou done well to come; for I shall ease ray soul by reviling thee, and thou wilt be vexed at my recital.


πασῶν, ἀναίδει'. εὖ δ' ἐποίησας μολών:to confront thy friends after injuring them, but that worst of all human diseases—loss of shame. Yet hast thou done well to come; for I shall ease ray soul by reviling thee, and thou wilt be vexed at my recital.


ἐγώ τε γὰρ λέξασα κουφισθήσομαιto confront thy friends after injuring them, but that worst of all human diseases—loss of shame. Yet hast thou done well to come; for I shall ease ray soul by reviling thee, and thou wilt be vexed at my recital.


ψυχὴν κακῶς σὲ καὶ σὺ λυπήσῃ κλύων.to confront thy friends after injuring them, but that worst of all human diseases—loss of shame. Yet hast thou done well to come; for I shall ease ray soul by reviling thee, and thou wilt be vexed at my recital.


ἐκ τῶν δὲ πρώτων πρῶτον ἄρξομαι λέγειν:I will begin at the very beginning. I saved thy life, as every Hellene knows who sailed with thee aboard the good ship Argo, when thou wert sent to tame and yoke fire-breathing bulls, and to sow the deadly tilth.


ἔσωσά ς', ὡς ἴσασιν ̔Ελλήνων ὅσοιI will begin at the very beginning. I saved thy life, as every Hellene knows who sailed with thee aboard the good ship Argo, when thou wert sent to tame and yoke fire-breathing bulls, and to sow the deadly tilth.


ταὐτὸν συνεισέβησαν ̓Αργῷον σκάφοςI will begin at the very beginning. I saved thy life, as every Hellene knows who sailed with thee aboard the good ship Argo, when thou wert sent to tame and yoke fire-breathing bulls, and to sow the deadly tilth.


πεμφθέντα ταύρων πυρπνόων ἐπιστάτηνI will begin at the very beginning. I saved thy life, as every Hellene knows who sailed with thee aboard the good ship Argo, when thou wert sent to tame and yoke fire-breathing bulls, and to sow the deadly tilth.


ζεύγλαισι καὶ σπεροῦντα θανάσιμον γύην:I will begin at the very beginning. I saved thy life, as every Hellene knows who sailed with thee aboard the good ship Argo, when thou wert sent to tame and yoke fire-breathing bulls, and to sow the deadly tilth.


δράκοντά θ', ὃς πάγχρυσον ἀμπέχων δέροςYea, and I slew the dragon which guarded the golden fleece, keeping sleepless watch o’er it with many a wreathed coil, and I raised for thee a beacon of deliver arice. Father and home of my free will I left and came with thee to Iolcos, ’neath Pelion’s hills


σπείραις ἔσῳζε πολυπλόκοις ἄυπνος ὤνYea, and I slew the dragon which guarded the golden fleece, keeping sleepless watch o’er it with many a wreathed coil, and I raised for thee a beacon of deliver arice. Father and home of my free will I left and came with thee to Iolcos, ’neath Pelion’s hills


κτείνας' ἀνέσχον σοὶ φάος σωτήριον.Yea, and I slew the dragon which guarded the golden fleece, keeping sleepless watch o’er it with many a wreathed coil, and I raised for thee a beacon of deliver arice. Father and home of my free will I left and came with thee to Iolcos, ’neath Pelion’s hills


αὐτὴ δὲ πατέρα καὶ δόμους προδοῦς' ἐμοὺςYea, and I slew the dragon which guarded the golden fleece, keeping sleepless watch o’er it with many a wreathed coil, and I raised for thee a beacon of deliver arice. Father and home of my free will I left and came with thee to Iolcos, ’neath Pelion’s hills


τὴν Πηλιῶτιν εἰς ̓Ιωλκὸν ἱκόμηνYea, and I slew the dragon which guarded the golden fleece, keeping sleepless watch o’er it with many a wreathed coil, and I raised for thee a beacon of deliver arice. Father and home of my free will I left and came with thee to Iolcos, ’neath Pelion’s hills


σὺν σοί, πρόθυμος μᾶλλον ἢ σοφωτέρα:for my love was stronger than my prudence. Next I caused the death of Pelias by a doom most grievous, even by his own children’s hand, beguiling them of all their fear. All this have I done for thee, thou traitor! and thou hast cast me over, taking to thyself another wife


Πελίαν τ' ἀπέκτειν', ὥσπερ ἄλγιστον θανεῖνfor my love was stronger than my prudence. Next I caused the death of Pelias by a doom most grievous, even by his own children’s hand, beguiling them of all their fear. All this have I done for thee, thou traitor! and thou hast cast me over, taking to thyself another wife


παίδων ὕπ' αὐτοῦ, πάντα τ' ἐξεῖλον δόμον.for my love was stronger than my prudence. Next I caused the death of Pelias by a doom most grievous, even by his own children’s hand, beguiling them of all their fear. All this have I done for thee, thou traitor! and thou hast cast me over, taking to thyself another wife


καὶ ταῦθ' ὑφ' ἡμῶν, ὦ κάκιστ' ἀνδρῶν, παθὼνfor my love was stronger than my prudence. Next I caused the death of Pelias by a doom most grievous, even by his own children’s hand, beguiling them of all their fear. All this have I done for thee, thou traitor! and thou hast cast me over, taking to thyself another wife


προύδωκας ἡμᾶς, καινὰ δ' ἐκτήσω λέχηfor my love was stronger than my prudence. Next I caused the death of Pelias by a doom most grievous, even by his own children’s hand, beguiling them of all their fear. All this have I done for thee, thou traitor! and thou hast cast me over, taking to thyself another wife


παίδων γεγώτων: εἰ γὰρ ἦσθ' ἄπαις ἔτιthough children have been bom to us. Hadst thou been childless still, I could have pardoned thy desire for this new union.


συγγνώστ' ἂν ἦν σοι τοῦδ' ἐρασθῆναι λέχους.though children have been bom to us. Hadst thou been childless still, I could have pardoned thy desire for this new union.


ὅρκων δὲ φρούδη πίστις, οὐδ' ἔχω μαθεῖνGone is now the trust I put in oaths. I cannot even understand whether thou thinkest that the gods of old no longer rule, or that fresh decrees are now in vogue amongst mankind


εἰ θεοὺς νομίζεις τοὺς τότ' οὐκ ἄρχειν ἔτιGone is now the trust I put in oaths. I cannot even understand whether thou thinkest that the gods of old no longer rule, or that fresh decrees are now in vogue amongst mankind


ἢ καινὰ κεῖσθαι θέσμι' ἀνθρώποις τὰ νῦνGone is now the trust I put in oaths. I cannot even understand whether thou thinkest that the gods of old no longer rule, or that fresh decrees are now in vogue amongst mankind


ἐπεὶ σύνοισθά γ' εἰς ἔμ' οὐκ εὔορκος ὤν.for thy conscience must tell thee thou hast not kept faith with me. Ah! poor right hand, which thou didst often grasp. These knees thou didst embrace! All in vain, I suffered a traitor to touch me! How short of my hopes I am fallen! But come, I will deal with thee as though thou wert my friend.


φεῦ δεξιὰ χείρ, ἧς σὺ πόλλ' ἐλαμβάνουfor thy conscience must tell thee thou hast not kept faith with me. Ah! poor right hand, which thou didst often grasp. These knees thou didst embrace! All in vain, I suffered a traitor to touch me! How short of my hopes I am fallen! But come, I will deal with thee as though thou wert my friend.


καὶ τῶνδε γονάτων, ὡς μάτην κεχρῴσμεθαfor thy conscience must tell thee thou hast not kept faith with me. Ah! poor right hand, which thou didst often grasp. These knees thou didst embrace! All in vain, I suffered a traitor to touch me! How short of my hopes I am fallen! But come, I will deal with thee as though thou wert my friend.


κακοῦ πρὸς ἀνδρός, ἐλπίδων δ' ἡμάρτομεν.for thy conscience must tell thee thou hast not kept faith with me. Ah! poor right hand, which thou didst often grasp. These knees thou didst embrace! All in vain, I suffered a traitor to touch me! How short of my hopes I am fallen! But come, I will deal with thee as though thou wert my friend.


ἄγ', ὡς φίλῳ γὰρ ὄντι σοι κοινώσομαιfor thy conscience must tell thee thou hast not kept faith with me. Ah! poor right hand, which thou didst often grasp. These knees thou didst embrace! All in vain, I suffered a traitor to touch me! How short of my hopes I am fallen! But come, I will deal with thee as though thou wert my friend.


(δοκοῦσα μὲν τί πρός γε σοῦ πράξειν καλῶς;Yet what kindness can I expect from one so base as thee? but yet I will do it, for my questioning will show thee yet more base. Whither can I turn me now? to my father’s house, to my own country, which I for thee deserted to come hither? to the hapless daughters of Pelias? A glad


ὅμως δ', ἐρωτηθεὶς γὰρ αἰσχίων φανῇ):Yet what kindness can I expect from one so base as thee? but yet I will do it, for my questioning will show thee yet more base. Whither can I turn me now? to my father’s house, to my own country, which I for thee deserted to come hither? to the hapless daughters of Pelias? A glad


νῦν ποῖ τράπωμαι; πότερα πρὸς πατρὸς δόμουςYet what kindness can I expect from one so base as thee? but yet I will do it, for my questioning will show thee yet more base. Whither can I turn me now? to my father’s house, to my own country, which I for thee deserted to come hither? to the hapless daughters of Pelias? A glad


οὓς σοὶ προδοῦσα καὶ πάτραν ἀφικόμην;Yet what kindness can I expect from one so base as thee? but yet I will do it, for my questioning will show thee yet more base. Whither can I turn me now? to my father’s house, to my own country, which I for thee deserted to come hither? to the hapless daughters of Pelias? A glad


ἢ πρὸς ταλαίνας Πελιάδας; καλῶς γ' ἂν οὖνYet what kindness can I expect from one so base as thee? but yet I will do it, for my questioning will show thee yet more base. Whither can I turn me now? to my father’s house, to my own country, which I for thee deserted to come hither? to the hapless daughters of Pelias? A glad


δέξαιντό μ' οἴκοις ὧν πατέρα κατέκτανον.welcome, I trow, would they give me in their home, whose father’s death I compassed! My case stands even thus: I am become the bitter foe to those of mine own home, and those whom I need ne’er have wronged I have made mine enemies to pleasure thee. Wherefore to reward me for this thou hast made me doubly blest in the eyes of many a wife in Hellas;


ἔχει γὰρ οὕτω: τοῖς μὲν οἴκοθεν φίλοιςwelcome, I trow, would they give me in their home, whose father’s death I compassed! My case stands even thus: I am become the bitter foe to those of mine own home, and those whom I need ne’er have wronged I have made mine enemies to pleasure thee. Wherefore to reward me for this thou hast made me doubly blest in the eyes of many a wife in Hellas;


ἐχθρὰ καθέστηχ', οὓς δέ μ' οὐκ ἐχρῆν κακῶςwelcome, I trow, would they give me in their home, whose father’s death I compassed! My case stands even thus: I am become the bitter foe to those of mine own home, and those whom I need ne’er have wronged I have made mine enemies to pleasure thee. Wherefore to reward me for this thou hast made me doubly blest in the eyes of many a wife in Hellas;


δρᾶν, σοὶ χάριν φέρουσα πολεμίους ἔχω.welcome, I trow, would they give me in their home, whose father’s death I compassed! My case stands even thus: I am become the bitter foe to those of mine own home, and those whom I need ne’er have wronged I have made mine enemies to pleasure thee. Wherefore to reward me for this thou hast made me doubly blest in the eyes of many a wife in Hellas;


τοιγάρ με πολλαῖς μακαρίαν ̔Ελληνίδωνwelcome, I trow, would they give me in their home, whose father’s death I compassed! My case stands even thus: I am become the bitter foe to those of mine own home, and those whom I need ne’er have wronged I have made mine enemies to pleasure thee. Wherefore to reward me for this thou hast made me doubly blest in the eyes of many a wife in Hellas;


ἔθηκας ἀντὶ τῶνδε: θαυμαστὸν δέ σεand in thee I own a peerless, trusty lord. O woe is me, if indeed I am to be cast forth an exile from the land, without one friend; one lone woman with her babes forlorn! Yea, a fine reproach to thee in thy bridal hour


ἔχω πόσιν καὶ πιστὸν ἡ τάλαιν' ἐγώand in thee I own a peerless, trusty lord. O woe is me, if indeed I am to be cast forth an exile from the land, without one friend; one lone woman with her babes forlorn! Yea, a fine reproach to thee in thy bridal hour


εἰ φεύξομαί γε γαῖαν ἐκβεβλημένηand in thee I own a peerless, trusty lord. O woe is me, if indeed I am to be cast forth an exile from the land, without one friend; one lone woman with her babes forlorn! Yea, a fine reproach to thee in thy bridal hour


φίλων ἔρημος, σὺν τέκνοις μόνη μόνοις:and in thee I own a peerless, trusty lord. O woe is me, if indeed I am to be cast forth an exile from the land, without one friend; one lone woman with her babes forlorn! Yea, a fine reproach to thee in thy bridal hour


καλόν γ' ὄνειδος τῷ νεωστὶ νυμφίῳand in thee I own a peerless, trusty lord. O woe is me, if indeed I am to be cast forth an exile from the land, without one friend; one lone woman with her babes forlorn! Yea, a fine reproach to thee in thy bridal hour


πτωχοὺς ἀλᾶσθαι παῖδας ἥ τ' ἔσωσά σε.that thy children and the wife who saved thy life are beggars and vagabonds! O Zeus! why hast thou granted unto man clear signs to know the sham in gold, white on man’s brow no brand is stamped whereby to gauge the villain’s heart? Choru


ὦ Ζεῦ, τί δὴ χρυσοῦ μὲν ὃς κίβδηλος ᾖthat thy children and the wife who saved thy life are beggars and vagabonds! O Zeus! why hast thou granted unto man clear signs to know the sham in gold, white on man’s brow no brand is stamped whereby to gauge the villain’s heart? Choru


τεκμήρι' ἀνθρώποισιν ὤπασας σαφῆthat thy children and the wife who saved thy life are beggars and vagabonds! O Zeus! why hast thou granted unto man clear signs to know the sham in gold, white on man’s brow no brand is stamped whereby to gauge the villain’s heart? Choru


ἀνδρῶν δ' ὅτῳ χρὴ τὸν κακὸν διειδέναιthat thy children and the wife who saved thy life are beggars and vagabonds! O Zeus! why hast thou granted unto man clear signs to know the sham in gold, white on man’s brow no brand is stamped whereby to gauge the villain’s heart? Choru


οὐδεὶς χαρακτὴρ ἐμπέφυκε σώματι;that thy children and the wife who saved thy life are beggars and vagabonds! O Zeus! why hast thou granted unto man clear signs to know the sham in gold, white on man’s brow no brand is stamped whereby to gauge the villain’s heart? Choru


δεινή τις ὀργὴ καὶ δυσίατος πέλειThere is a something terrible and past all cure, when quarrels arise ’twixt those who are near and dear. Jason


ὅταν φίλοι φίλοισι συμβάλως' ἔριν.There is a something terrible and past all cure, when quarrels arise ’twixt those who are near and dear. Jason


δεῖ μ', ὡς ἔοικε, μὴ κακὸν φῦναι λέγεινNeeds must I now, it seems, turn orator, and, like a good helmsman on a ship with close-reefed sails, weather


ἀλλ' ὥστε ναὸς κεδνὸν οἰακοστρόφονNeeds must I now, it seems, turn orator, and, like a good helmsman on a ship with close-reefed sails, weather


ἄκροισι λαίφους κρασπέδοις ὑπεκδραμεῖνNeeds must I now, it seems, turn orator, and, like a good helmsman on a ship with close-reefed sails, weather


τὴν σὴν στόμαργον, ὦ γύναι, γλωσσαλγίαν.that wearisome tongue of thine. Now, I believe, since thou wilt exaggerate thy favours, that to Cypris alone of gods or men I owe the safety of my voyage. Thou hast a subtle wit enough; yet were it a hateful thing for me


ἐγὼ δ', ἐπειδὴ καὶ λίαν πυργοῖς χάρινthat wearisome tongue of thine. Now, I believe, since thou wilt exaggerate thy favours, that to Cypris alone of gods or men I owe the safety of my voyage. Thou hast a subtle wit enough; yet were it a hateful thing for me


Κύπριν νομίζω τῆς ἐμῆς ναυκληρίαςthat wearisome tongue of thine. Now, I believe, since thou wilt exaggerate thy favours, that to Cypris alone of gods or men I owe the safety of my voyage. Thou hast a subtle wit enough; yet were it a hateful thing for me


σώτειραν εἶναι θεῶν τε κἀνθρώπων μόνην.that wearisome tongue of thine. Now, I believe, since thou wilt exaggerate thy favours, that to Cypris alone of gods or men I owe the safety of my voyage. Thou hast a subtle wit enough; yet were it a hateful thing for me


σοὶ δ' ἔστι μὲν νοῦς λεπτός — ἀλλ' ἐπίφθονοςthat wearisome tongue of thine. Now, I believe, since thou wilt exaggerate thy favours, that to Cypris alone of gods or men I owe the safety of my voyage. Thou hast a subtle wit enough; yet were it a hateful thing for me


λόγος διελθεῖν, ὡς ̓́Ερως ς' ἠνάγκασενto say that the Love-god constrained thee by his resistless shaft to save my life. However, I will not reckon this too nicely; ’twas kindly done, however thou didst serve me. Yet for my safety


τόξοις ἀφύκτοις τοὐμὸν ἐκσῶσαι δέμας.to say that the Love-god constrained thee by his resistless shaft to save my life. However, I will not reckon this too nicely; ’twas kindly done, however thou didst serve me. Yet for my safety


ἀλλ' οὐκ ἀκριβῶς αὐτὸ θήσομαι λίαν:to say that the Love-god constrained thee by his resistless shaft to save my life. However, I will not reckon this too nicely; ’twas kindly done, however thou didst serve me. Yet for my safety


ὅπῃ γὰρ οὖν ὤνησας οὐ κακῶς ἔχει.to say that the Love-god constrained thee by his resistless shaft to save my life. However, I will not reckon this too nicely; ’twas kindly done, however thou didst serve me. Yet for my safety


μείζω γε μέντοι τῆς ἐμῆς σωτηρίαςto say that the Love-god constrained thee by his resistless shaft to save my life. However, I will not reckon this too nicely; ’twas kindly done, however thou didst serve me. Yet for my safety


εἴληφας ἢ δέδωκας, ὡς ἐγὼ φράσω.hast thou received more than ever thou gavest, as I will show. First, thou dwellest in Hellas, instead of thy barbarian land, and hast learnt what justice means find how to live by law, not by the dictates of brute force; and all the Hellenes recognize thy cleverness


πρῶτον μὲν ̔Ελλάδ' ἀντὶ βαρβάρου χθονὸςhast thou received more than ever thou gavest, as I will show. First, thou dwellest in Hellas, instead of thy barbarian land, and hast learnt what justice means find how to live by law, not by the dictates of brute force; and all the Hellenes recognize thy cleverness


γαῖαν κατοικεῖς καὶ δίκην ἐπίστασαιhast thou received more than ever thou gavest, as I will show. First, thou dwellest in Hellas, instead of thy barbarian land, and hast learnt what justice means find how to live by law, not by the dictates of brute force; and all the Hellenes recognize thy cleverness


νόμοις τε χρῆσθαι μὴ πρὸς ἰσχύος χάριν:hast thou received more than ever thou gavest, as I will show. First, thou dwellest in Hellas, instead of thy barbarian land, and hast learnt what justice means find how to live by law, not by the dictates of brute force; and all the Hellenes recognize thy cleverness


πάντες δέ ς' ᾔσθοντ' οὖσαν ̔́Ελληνες σοφὴνhast thou received more than ever thou gavest, as I will show. First, thou dwellest in Hellas, instead of thy barbarian land, and hast learnt what justice means find how to live by law, not by the dictates of brute force; and all the Hellenes recognize thy cleverness


καὶ δόξαν ἔσχες: εἰ δὲ γῆς ἐπ' ἐσχάτοιςand thou hast gained a name; whereas, if thou hadst dwelt upon the confines of the earth, no tongue had mentioned thee. Give me no gold within my halls; nor skill to sing a fairer strain than ever Orpheus sang, unless therewith my fame be spread abroad!


ὅροισιν ᾤκεις, οὐκ ἂν ἦν λόγος σέθεν.and thou hast gained a name; whereas, if thou hadst dwelt upon the confines of the earth, no tongue had mentioned thee. Give me no gold within my halls; nor skill to sing a fairer strain than ever Orpheus sang, unless therewith my fame be spread abroad!


εἴη δ' ἔμοιγε μήτε χρυσὸς ἐν δόμοιςand thou hast gained a name; whereas, if thou hadst dwelt upon the confines of the earth, no tongue had mentioned thee. Give me no gold within my halls; nor skill to sing a fairer strain than ever Orpheus sang, unless therewith my fame be spread abroad!


μήτ' ̓Ορφέως κάλλιον ὑμνῆσαι μέλοςand thou hast gained a name; whereas, if thou hadst dwelt upon the confines of the earth, no tongue had mentioned thee. Give me no gold within my halls; nor skill to sing a fairer strain than ever Orpheus sang, unless therewith my fame be spread abroad!


εἰ μὴ 'πίσημος ἡ τύχη γένοιτό μοι.and thou hast gained a name; whereas, if thou hadst dwelt upon the confines of the earth, no tongue had mentioned thee. Give me no gold within my halls; nor skill to sing a fairer strain than ever Orpheus sang, unless therewith my fame be spread abroad!


τοσαῦτα μέν σοι τῶν ἐμῶν πόνων πέριSo much I say to thee about my own toils, for ’twas thou didst challenge me to this retort. As for the taunts thou urgest against my marriage with the princess, I will prove to thee, first, that I am prudent herein, next chastened in my love, and last a powerful friend


ἔλεξ': ἅμιλλαν γὰρ σὺ προύθηκας λόγων.So much I say to thee about my own toils, for ’twas thou didst challenge me to this retort. As for the taunts thou urgest against my marriage with the princess, I will prove to thee, first, that I am prudent herein, next chastened in my love, and last a powerful friend


ἃ δ' ἐς γάμους μοι βασιλικοὺς ὠνείδισαςSo much I say to thee about my own toils, for ’twas thou didst challenge me to this retort. As for the taunts thou urgest against my marriage with the princess, I will prove to thee, first, that I am prudent herein, next chastened in my love, and last a powerful friend


ἐν τῷδε δείξω πρῶτα μὲν σοφὸς γεγώςSo much I say to thee about my own toils, for ’twas thou didst challenge me to this retort. As for the taunts thou urgest against my marriage with the princess, I will prove to thee, first, that I am prudent herein, next chastened in my love, and last a powerful friend


ἔπειτα σώφρων, εἶτα σοὶ μέγας φίλοςSo much I say to thee about my own toils, for ’twas thou didst challenge me to this retort. As for the taunts thou urgest against my marriage with the princess, I will prove to thee, first, that I am prudent herein, next chastened in my love, and last a powerful friend


καὶ παισὶ τοῖς ἐμοῖσιν — ἀλλ' ἔχ' ἥσυχος.to thee and to thy sons; only hold thy peace. Since I have here withdrawn from Iolcos with many a hopeless trouble at my back, what happier device could I, an exile, frame than marriage with the daughter of the king?


ἐπεὶ μετέστην δεῦρ' ̓Ιωλκίας χθονὸςto thee and to thy sons; only hold thy peace. Since I have here withdrawn from Iolcos with many a hopeless trouble at my back, what happier device could I, an exile, frame than marriage with the daughter of the king?


πολλὰς ἐφέλκων συμφορὰς ἀμηχάνουςto thee and to thy sons; only hold thy peace. Since I have here withdrawn from Iolcos with many a hopeless trouble at my back, what happier device could I, an exile, frame than marriage with the daughter of the king?


τί τοῦδ' ἂν εὕρημ' ηὗρον εὐτυχέστερονto thee and to thy sons; only hold thy peace. Since I have here withdrawn from Iolcos with many a hopeless trouble at my back, what happier device could I, an exile, frame than marriage with the daughter of the king?


ἢ παῖδα γῆμαι βασιλέως φυγὰς γεγώς;to thee and to thy sons; only hold thy peace. Since I have here withdrawn from Iolcos with many a hopeless trouble at my back, what happier device could I, an exile, frame than marriage with the daughter of the king?


οὐχ, ᾗ σὺ κνίζῃ, σὸν μὲν ἐχθαίρων λέχος’Tis not because I loathe thee for my wife—the thought that rankles in thy heart; ’tis not because I am smitten with desire fot a new bride, nor yet that I am eager to vie with others in begetting many children, for those we have are quite enough, and I do not complain. Nay, ’tis that we—and this is most important—


καινῆς δὲ νύμφης ἱμέρῳ πεπληγμένος’Tis not because I loathe thee for my wife—the thought that rankles in thy heart; ’tis not because I am smitten with desire fot a new bride, nor yet that I am eager to vie with others in begetting many children, for those we have are quite enough, and I do not complain. Nay, ’tis that we—and this is most important—


οὐδ' εἰς ἅμιλλαν πολύτεκνον σπουδὴν ἔχων:’Tis not because I loathe thee for my wife—the thought that rankles in thy heart; ’tis not because I am smitten with desire fot a new bride, nor yet that I am eager to vie with others in begetting many children, for those we have are quite enough, and I do not complain. Nay, ’tis that we—and this is most important—


ἅλις γὰρ οἱ γεγῶτες οὐδὲ μέμφομαι:’Tis not because I loathe thee for my wife—the thought that rankles in thy heart; ’tis not because I am smitten with desire fot a new bride, nor yet that I am eager to vie with others in begetting many children, for those we have are quite enough, and I do not complain. Nay, ’tis that we—and this is most important—


ἀλλ' ὡς, τὸ μὲν μέγιστον, οἰκοῖμεν καλῶς’Tis not because I loathe thee for my wife—the thought that rankles in thy heart; ’tis not because I am smitten with desire fot a new bride, nor yet that I am eager to vie with others in begetting many children, for those we have are quite enough, and I do not complain. Nay, ’tis that we—and this is most important—


καὶ μὴ σπανιζοίμεσθα, γιγνώσκων ὅτιmay dwell in comfort, instead of suffering want (for well I know that every whilom friend avoids the poor), and that I might rear my sons as doth befit my house; further, that I might be the father of brothers for the children thou hast born, and raise these to the same high rank, uniting the family in one,—


πένητα φεύγει πᾶς τις ἐκποδὼν φίλονmay dwell in comfort, instead of suffering want (for well I know that every whilom friend avoids the poor), and that I might rear my sons as doth befit my house; further, that I might be the father of brothers for the children thou hast born, and raise these to the same high rank, uniting the family in one,—


παῖδας δὲ θρέψαιμ' ἀξίως δόμων ἐμῶνmay dwell in comfort, instead of suffering want (for well I know that every whilom friend avoids the poor), and that I might rear my sons as doth befit my house; further, that I might be the father of brothers for the children thou hast born, and raise these to the same high rank, uniting the family in one,—


σπείρας τ' ἀδελφοὺς τοῖσιν ἐκ σέθεν τέκνοιςmay dwell in comfort, instead of suffering want (for well I know that every whilom friend avoids the poor), and that I might rear my sons as doth befit my house; further, that I might be the father of brothers for the children thou hast born, and raise these to the same high rank, uniting the family in one,—


ἐς ταὐτὸ θείην, καὶ ξυναρτήσας γένοςmay dwell in comfort, instead of suffering want (for well I know that every whilom friend avoids the poor), and that I might rear my sons as doth befit my house; further, that I might be the father of brothers for the children thou hast born, and raise these to the same high rank, uniting the family in one,—


εὐδαιμονοίην. σοί τε γὰρ παίδων τί δεῖ;to my lasting bliss. Thou, indeed, hast no need of more children, but me it profits to help my present family by that which is to be. Have I miscarried here? Not even thou wouldest say so unless a rival’s charms rankled in thy bosom. No, but you women have such strange ideas


ἐμοί τε λύει τοῖσι μέλλουσιν τέκνοιςto my lasting bliss. Thou, indeed, hast no need of more children, but me it profits to help my present family by that which is to be. Have I miscarried here? Not even thou wouldest say so unless a rival’s charms rankled in thy bosom. No, but you women have such strange ideas


τὰ ζῶντ' ὀνῆσαι. μῶν βεβούλευμαι κακῶς;to my lasting bliss. Thou, indeed, hast no need of more children, but me it profits to help my present family by that which is to be. Have I miscarried here? Not even thou wouldest say so unless a rival’s charms rankled in thy bosom. No, but you women have such strange ideas


οὐδ' ἂν σὺ φαίης, εἴ σε μὴ κνίζοι λέχος.to my lasting bliss. Thou, indeed, hast no need of more children, but me it profits to help my present family by that which is to be. Have I miscarried here? Not even thou wouldest say so unless a rival’s charms rankled in thy bosom. No, but you women have such strange ideas


ἀλλ' ἐς τοσοῦτον ἥκεθ' ὥστ' ὀρθουμένηςto my lasting bliss. Thou, indeed, hast no need of more children, but me it profits to help my present family by that which is to be. Have I miscarried here? Not even thou wouldest say so unless a rival’s charms rankled in thy bosom. No, but you women have such strange ideas


εὐνῆς γυναῖκες πάντ' ἔχειν νομίζετεthat you think all is well so long as your married life runs smooth; but if some mischance occur to ruffle your love, all that was good and lovely erst you reckon as your foes. Yea, men should have begotten children from some other source, no female race existing;


ἢν δ' αὖ γένηται ξυμφορά τις ἐς λέχοςthat you think all is well so long as your married life runs smooth; but if some mischance occur to ruffle your love, all that was good and lovely erst you reckon as your foes. Yea, men should have begotten children from some other source, no female race existing;


τὰ λῷστα καὶ κάλλιστα πολεμιώταταthat you think all is well so long as your married life runs smooth; but if some mischance occur to ruffle your love, all that was good and lovely erst you reckon as your foes. Yea, men should have begotten children from some other source, no female race existing;


τίθεσθε. χρῆν τἄρ' ἄλλοθέν ποθεν βροτοὺςthat you think all is well so long as your married life runs smooth; but if some mischance occur to ruffle your love, all that was good and lovely erst you reckon as your foes. Yea, men should have begotten children from some other source, no female race existing;


παῖδας τεκνοῦσθαι, θῆλυ δ' οὐκ εἶναι γένος:that you think all is well so long as your married life runs smooth; but if some mischance occur to ruffle your love, all that was good and lovely erst you reckon as your foes. Yea, men should have begotten children from some other source, no female race existing;


χοὔτως ἂν οὐκ ἦν οὐδὲν ἀνθρώποις κακόν.thus would no evil ever have fallen on mankind. Choru


̓Ιᾶσον, εὖ μὲν τούσδ' ἐκόσμησας λόγους:This speech, O Jason, hast thou with specious art arranged; but yet I think—albeit in saying so I betray indiscretion—that thou hast sinned in casting over thy wife. Medea


ὅμως δ' ἔμοιγε, κεἰ παρὰ γνώμην ἐρῶThis speech, O Jason, hast thou with specious art arranged; but yet I think—albeit in saying so I betray indiscretion—that thou hast sinned in casting over thy wife. Medea


δοκεῖς προδοὺς σὴν ἄλοχον οὐ δίκαια δρᾶν.This speech, O Jason, hast thou with specious art arranged; but yet I think—albeit in saying so I betray indiscretion—that thou hast sinned in casting over thy wife. Medea


ἦ πολλὰ πολλοῖς εἰμι διάφορος βροτῶν:No doubt I differ from the mass of men on many points;


ἐμοὶ γὰρ ὅστις ἄδικος ὢν σοφὸς λέγεινfor, to my mind, whoso hath skill to fence with words in an unjust cause, incurs the heaviest penalty; for such an one, confident that he can cast a decent veil of words o’er his injustice, dares to practise it; and yet he is not so very clever after all. So do not thou put forth thy specious plea


πέφυκε, πλείστην ζημίαν ὀφλισκάνει:for, to my mind, whoso hath skill to fence with words in an unjust cause, incurs the heaviest penalty; for such an one, confident that he can cast a decent veil of words o’er his injustice, dares to practise it; and yet he is not so very clever after all. So do not thou put forth thy specious plea


γλώσσῃ γὰρ αὐχῶν τἄδικ' εὖ περιστελεῖνfor, to my mind, whoso hath skill to fence with words in an unjust cause, incurs the heaviest penalty; for such an one, confident that he can cast a decent veil of words o’er his injustice, dares to practise it; and yet he is not so very clever after all. So do not thou put forth thy specious plea


τολμᾷ πανουργεῖν: ἔστι δ' οὐκ ἄγαν σοφός.for, to my mind, whoso hath skill to fence with words in an unjust cause, incurs the heaviest penalty; for such an one, confident that he can cast a decent veil of words o’er his injustice, dares to practise it; and yet he is not so very clever after all. So do not thou put forth thy specious plea


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 24.677-24.694 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

24.677. /but Achilles slept in the innermost part of the well-builded hut, and by his side lay fair-cheeked Briseis. 24.678. /but Achilles slept in the innermost part of the well-builded hut, and by his side lay fair-cheeked Briseis. 24.679. /but Achilles slept in the innermost part of the well-builded hut, and by his side lay fair-cheeked Briseis. Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, overcome of soft sleep; but not upon the helper Hermes might sleep lay hold 24.680. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.681. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.682. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.683. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.684. /as he pondered in mind how he should guide king Priam forth from the ships unmarked of the strong keepers of the gate. He took his stand above his head and spake to him, saying:Old sire, no thought then hast thou of any evil, that thou still sleepest thus amid foemen, for that Achilles has spared thee. 24.685. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.686. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.687. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.688. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.689. /Now verily hast thou ransomed thy son, and a great price thou gavest. But for thine own life must the sons thou hast, they that be left behind, give ransom thrice so great, if so be Agamemnon, Atreus' son, have knowledge of thee, or the host of the Achaeans have knowledge. So spake he, and the old man was seized with fear, and made the herald to arise. 24.690. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.691. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.692. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.693. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus 24.694. /And Hermes yoked for them the horses and mules, and himself lightly drave them through the camp, neither had any man knowledge thereof.But when they were now come to the ford of the fair-flowing river, even eddying Xanthus, that immortal Zeus begat, then Hermes departed to high Olympus
2. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 66 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

66. He took the hollow lyre which he placed
3. Euripides, Medea, 109, 112-114, 119-121, 144-145, 148-153, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-172, 18-19, 190-199, 20, 200-203, 208-209, 21, 210, 214-215, 22, 225, 23, 230-251, 255-256, 259-266, 285-286, 305, 316, 324, 345, 348, 351-354, 39-40, 410-439, 44, 440-445, 447-583, 586-587, 591-592, 595-599, 610-613, 619-620, 625-641, 643, 665-758, 764-810, 9-10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. to slay their father and come to live here in the land of Corinth with her husband and children, where her exile found favour with the citizens to whose land she had come, and in all things of her own accord was she at one with Jason, the greatest safeguard thi
4. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.304-4.392, 4.433, 4.553-4.570 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.304. receiving fertile coastland for her farms 4.305. by hospitable grant! She dares disdain 4.306. our proffered nuptial vow. She has proclaimed 4.307. Aeneas partner of her bed and throne. 4.308. And now that Paris, with his eunuch crew 4.309. beneath his chin and fragrant, oozy hair 4.310. ties the soft Lydian bonnet, boasting well 4.311. his stolen prize. But we to all these fanes 4.312. though they be thine, a fruitless offering bring 4.314. As thus he prayed and to the altars clung 4.315. th' Omnipotent gave ear, and turned his gaze 4.316. upon the royal dwelling, where for love 4.317. the amorous pair forgot their place and name. 4.318. Then thus to Mercury he gave command: 4.319. “Haste thee, my son, upon the Zephyrs call 4.320. and take thy winged way! My mandate bear 4.321. unto that prince of Troy who tarries now 4.322. in Tyrian Carthage, heedless utterly 4.323. of empire Heaven-bestowed. On winged winds 4.324. hasten with my decrees. Not such the man 4.325. his beauteous mother promised; not for this 4.326. twice did she shield him from the Greeks in arms: 4.327. but that he might rule Italy, a land 4.328. pregt with thrones and echoing with war; 4.329. that he of Teucer's seed a race should sire 4.330. and bring beneath its law the whole wide world. 4.331. If such a glory and event supreme 4.332. enkindle not his bosom; if such task 4.333. to his own honor speak not; can the sire 4.334. begrudge Ascanius the heritage 4.335. of the proud name of Rome ? What plans he now? 4.336. What mad hope bids him linger in the lap 4.337. of enemies, considering no more 4.338. the land Lavinian and Ausonia's sons. 4.339. Let him to sea! Be this our final word: 4.341. He spoke. The god a prompt obedience gave 4.342. to his great sire's command. He fastened first 4.343. those sandals of bright gold, which carry him 4.344. aloft o'er land or sea, with airy wings 4.345. that race the fleeting wind; then lifted he 4.346. his wand, wherewith he summons from the grave 4.347. pale-featured ghosts, or, if he will, consigns 4.348. to doleful Tartarus; or by its power 4.349. gives slumber or dispels; or quite unseals 4.350. the eyelids of the dead: on this relying 4.351. he routs the winds or cleaves th' obscurity 4.352. of stormful clouds. Soon from his flight he spied 4.353. the summit and the sides precipitous 4.354. of stubborn Atlas, whose star-pointing peak 4.355. props heaven; of Atlas, whose pine-wreathed brow 4.356. is girdled evermore with misty gloom 4.357. and lashed of wind and rain; a cloak of snow 4.358. melts on his shoulder; from his aged chin 4.359. drop rivers, and ensheathed in stiffening ice 4.360. glitters his great grim beard. Here first was stayed 4.361. the speed of Mercury's well-poising wing; 4.362. here making pause, from hence he headlong flung 4.363. his body to the sea; in motion like 4.364. ome sea-bird's, which along the levelled shore 4.365. or round tall crags where rove the swarming fish 4.366. flies Iow along the waves: o'er-hovering so 4.367. between the earth and skies, Cyllene's god 4.368. flew downward from his mother's mountain-sire 4.369. parted the winds and skimmed the sandy merge 4.370. of Libya . When first his winged feet 4.371. came nigh the clay-built Punic huts, he saw 4.372. Aeneas building at a citadel 4.373. and founding walls and towers; at his side 4.374. was girt a blade with yellow jaspers starred 4.375. his mantle with the stain of Tyrian shell 4.376. flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair 4.377. by opulent Dido with fine threads of gold 4.378. her gift of love; straightway the god began: 4.379. “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build 4.380. foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall 4.381. build her proud city? Hast thou, shameful loss! 4.382. Forgot thy kingdom and thy task sublime? 4.383. From bright Olympus, I. He who commands 4.384. all gods, and by his sovran deity 4.385. moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade 4.386. me bear on winged winds his high decree. 4.387. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou 4.388. linger so Iong in lap of Libyan land? 4.389. If the proud reward of thy destined way 4.390. move not thy heart, if all the arduous toil 4.391. to thine own honor speak not, Iook upon 4.392. Iulus in his bloom, thy hope and heir 4.433. out of my kingdom? Did our mutual joy 4.553. though yearning sore to remedy and soothe 4.554. uch misery, and with the timely word 4.555. her grief assuage, and though his burdened heart 4.556. was weak because of love, while many a groan 4.557. rose from his bosom, yet no whit did fail 4.558. to do the will of Heaven, but of his fleet 4.559. resumed command. The Trojans on the shore 4.560. ply well their task and push into the sea 4.561. the lofty ships. Now floats the shining keel 4.562. and oars they bring all leafy from the grove 4.563. with oak half-hewn, so hurried was the flight. 4.564. Behold them how they haste—from every gate 4.565. forth-streaming!—just as when a heap of corn 4.566. is thronged with ants, who, knowing winter nigh 4.567. refill their granaries; the long black line 4.568. runs o'er the levels, and conveys the spoil 4.569. in narrow pathway through the grass; a part 4.570. with straining and assiduous shoulder push


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeetes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
aeneas Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
apollonius Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69
calypso Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
carthage Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
dido Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
euripides Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
hermes, dolios/patron of tricks Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
kelly, a. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
mercury/hermes, in vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
oaths Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69
priam Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
skênê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 69
vergil, aeneid' Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187
vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 187