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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5628
Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 920-974


nanand rejoice in high prosperity with equal moderation. For these are the men who can count on ordering all their life rightly by wisdom’s rules. True, there are cases where it is pleasant not to be too wise


nanand rejoice in high prosperity with equal moderation. For these are the men who can count on ordering all their life rightly by wisdom’s rules. True, there are cases where it is pleasant not to be too wise


nanand rejoice in high prosperity with equal moderation. For these are the men who can count on ordering all their life rightly by wisdom’s rules. True, there are cases where it is pleasant not to be too wise


nanand rejoice in high prosperity with equal moderation. For these are the men who can count on ordering all their life rightly by wisdom’s rules. True, there are cases where it is pleasant not to be too wise


nanand rejoice in high prosperity with equal moderation. For these are the men who can count on ordering all their life rightly by wisdom’s rules. True, there are cases where it is pleasant not to be too wise


nanbut there are others, where some store of wisdom helps. Brought up in godly Chiron’s halls myself, I learned to keep a single heart; and provided the Atridae lead well, I will obey them; but when they cease from that, no more will I obey;


nanbut there are others, where some store of wisdom helps. Brought up in godly Chiron’s halls myself, I learned to keep a single heart; and provided the Atridae lead well, I will obey them; but when they cease from that, no more will I obey;


nanbut there are others, where some store of wisdom helps. Brought up in godly Chiron’s halls myself, I learned to keep a single heart; and provided the Atridae lead well, I will obey them; but when they cease from that, no more will I obey;


nanbut there are others, where some store of wisdom helps. Brought up in godly Chiron’s halls myself, I learned to keep a single heart; and provided the Atridae lead well, I will obey them; but when they cease from that, no more will I obey;


nanbut there are others, where some store of wisdom helps. Brought up in godly Chiron’s halls myself, I learned to keep a single heart; and provided the Atridae lead well, I will obey them; but when they cease from that, no more will I obey;


nanno, but here and in Troy I will show the freedom of my nature, and, as far as in me lies, do honor to Ares with my spear. You, lady, who have suffered so cruelly from your nearest and dearest, I will, by every effort in a young man’s power, set right, investing you with that amount of pity


nanno, but here and in Troy I will show the freedom of my nature, and, as far as in me lies, do honor to Ares with my spear. You, lady, who have suffered so cruelly from your nearest and dearest, I will, by every effort in a young man’s power, set right, investing you with that amount of pity


nanno, but here and in Troy I will show the freedom of my nature, and, as far as in me lies, do honor to Ares with my spear. You, lady, who have suffered so cruelly from your nearest and dearest, I will, by every effort in a young man’s power, set right, investing you with that amount of pity


nanno, but here and in Troy I will show the freedom of my nature, and, as far as in me lies, do honor to Ares with my spear. You, lady, who have suffered so cruelly from your nearest and dearest, I will, by every effort in a young man’s power, set right, investing you with that amount of pity


nanno, but here and in Troy I will show the freedom of my nature, and, as far as in me lies, do honor to Ares with my spear. You, lady, who have suffered so cruelly from your nearest and dearest, I will, by every effort in a young man’s power, set right, investing you with that amount of pity


nanand never shall your daughter, after being once called my bride, die by her father’s hand; for I will not lend myself to your husband’s subtle tricks; no! for it will be my name that kills your child, although it does not wield the sword. Your own husband


nanand never shall your daughter, after being once called my bride, die by her father’s hand; for I will not lend myself to your husband’s subtle tricks; no! for it will be my name that kills your child, although it does not wield the sword. Your own husband


nanand never shall your daughter, after being once called my bride, die by her father’s hand; for I will not lend myself to your husband’s subtle tricks; no! for it will be my name that kills your child, although it does not wield the sword. Your own husband


nanand never shall your daughter, after being once called my bride, die by her father’s hand; for I will not lend myself to your husband’s subtle tricks; no! for it will be my name that kills your child, although it does not wield the sword. Your own husband


nanand never shall your daughter, after being once called my bride, die by her father’s hand; for I will not lend myself to your husband’s subtle tricks; no! for it will be my name that kills your child, although it does not wield the sword. Your own husband


nanis the actual cause, but I shall no longer be guiltless, if, because of me and my marriage, this maiden perishes, she that has suffered past endurance and been the victim of affronts most strangely undeserved.


nanis the actual cause, but I shall no longer be guiltless, if, because of me and my marriage, this maiden perishes, she that has suffered past endurance and been the victim of affronts most strangely undeserved.


nanis the actual cause, but I shall no longer be guiltless, if, because of me and my marriage, this maiden perishes, she that has suffered past endurance and been the victim of affronts most strangely undeserved.


nanis the actual cause, but I shall no longer be guiltless, if, because of me and my marriage, this maiden perishes, she that has suffered past endurance and been the victim of affronts most strangely undeserved.


nanSo am I made the poorest wretch in Argos ;


nanI a thing of nothing, and Menelaus counting for a man! No son of Peleus I, but the issue of a vengeful fiend, if my name shall Reading φονεύσει with Schäfer. serve your husband for the murder. No! by Nereus, who begot my mother Thetis, in his home amid the flowing waves


nanI a thing of nothing, and Menelaus counting for a man! No son of Peleus I, but the issue of a vengeful fiend, if my name shall Reading φονεύσει with Schäfer. serve your husband for the murder. No! by Nereus, who begot my mother Thetis, in his home amid the flowing waves


nanI a thing of nothing, and Menelaus counting for a man! No son of Peleus I, but the issue of a vengeful fiend, if my name shall Reading φονεύσει with Schäfer. serve your husband for the murder. No! by Nereus, who begot my mother Thetis, in his home amid the flowing waves


nanI a thing of nothing, and Menelaus counting for a man! No son of Peleus I, but the issue of a vengeful fiend, if my name shall Reading φονεύσει with Schäfer. serve your husband for the murder. No! by Nereus, who begot my mother Thetis, in his home amid the flowing waves


nanI a thing of nothing, and Menelaus counting for a man! No son of Peleus I, but the issue of a vengeful fiend, if my name shall Reading φονεύσει with Schäfer. serve your husband for the murder. No! by Nereus, who begot my mother Thetis, in his home amid the flowing waves


nannever shall king Agamemnon touch your daughter, no! not even to the laying of a finger-tip upon her robe; or Sipylus A mountain in Lycia , near which was shown the grave of Tantalus, the ancestor of the Atridae; the town of the same name was swallowed up in very early times by an earthquake. , that frontier town of barbarism, the cradle of those chieftains’ line, will be henceforth a city indeed, while Phthia ’s name will nowhere find mention.


nannever shall king Agamemnon touch your daughter, no! not even to the laying of a finger-tip upon her robe; or Sipylus A mountain in Lycia , near which was shown the grave of Tantalus, the ancestor of the Atridae; the town of the same name was swallowed up in very early times by an earthquake. , that frontier town of barbarism, the cradle of those chieftains’ line, will be henceforth a city indeed, while Phthia ’s name will nowhere find mention.


nannever shall king Agamemnon touch your daughter, no! not even to the laying of a finger-tip upon her robe; or Sipylus A mountain in Lycia , near which was shown the grave of Tantalus, the ancestor of the Atridae; the town of the same name was swallowed up in very early times by an earthquake. , that frontier town of barbarism, the cradle of those chieftains’ line, will be henceforth a city indeed, while Phthia ’s name will nowhere find mention.


nannever shall king Agamemnon touch your daughter, no! not even to the laying of a finger-tip upon her robe; or Sipylus A mountain in Lycia , near which was shown the grave of Tantalus, the ancestor of the Atridae; the town of the same name was swallowed up in very early times by an earthquake. , that frontier town of barbarism, the cradle of those chieftains’ line, will be henceforth a city indeed, while Phthia ’s name will nowhere find mention.


nannever shall king Agamemnon touch your daughter, no! not even to the laying of a finger-tip upon her robe; or Sipylus A mountain in Lycia , near which was shown the grave of Tantalus, the ancestor of the Atridae; the town of the same name was swallowed up in very early times by an earthquake. , that frontier town of barbarism, the cradle of those chieftains’ line, will be henceforth a city indeed, while Phthia ’s name will nowhere find mention.


nanCalchas, the seer, shall rue beginning the sacrifice with his barley-meal and lustral water. Why, what is a seer? A man who with luck tells the truth sometimes, with frequent falsehoods, but when his luck deserts him, collapses then and there.


nanCalchas, the seer, shall rue beginning the sacrifice with his barley-meal and lustral water. Why, what is a seer? A man who with luck tells the truth sometimes, with frequent falsehoods, but when his luck deserts him, collapses then and there.


nanCalchas, the seer, shall rue beginning the sacrifice with his barley-meal and lustral water. Why, what is a seer? A man who with luck tells the truth sometimes, with frequent falsehoods, but when his luck deserts him, collapses then and there.


nanCalchas, the seer, shall rue beginning the sacrifice with his barley-meal and lustral water. Why, what is a seer? A man who with luck tells the truth sometimes, with frequent falsehoods, but when his luck deserts him, collapses then and there.


nanIt is not to secure a bride that I have spoken thus—there are maids unnumbered


naneager to have my love Reading οὐ for ἧ , and regarding μυρίαι—τοὐμὸν as parenthetical, which in the main is the view taken by Nauck and Klotz of this very nnsatisfactory passage. Paley, regarding it as an interpolation, disdains to emend it. —no! but king Agamemnon has put an insult on me; he should have asked my leave to use my name as a means to catch the child, for it was I i.e., it was my rank, etc., as described by Agamemnon, that carried the day, and, such being the case, I ought to have had some voice in the matter. (Paley.) chiefly who induced Clytemnestra to betroth her daughter to me;


naneager to have my love Reading οὐ for ἧ , and regarding μυρίαι—τοὐμὸν as parenthetical, which in the main is the view taken by Nauck and Klotz of this very nnsatisfactory passage. Paley, regarding it as an interpolation, disdains to emend it. —no! but king Agamemnon has put an insult on me; he should have asked my leave to use my name as a means to catch the child, for it was I i.e., it was my rank, etc., as described by Agamemnon, that carried the day, and, such being the case, I ought to have had some voice in the matter. (Paley.) chiefly who induced Clytemnestra to betroth her daughter to me;


naneager to have my love Reading οὐ for ἧ , and regarding μυρίαι—τοὐμὸν as parenthetical, which in the main is the view taken by Nauck and Klotz of this very nnsatisfactory passage. Paley, regarding it as an interpolation, disdains to emend it. —no! but king Agamemnon has put an insult on me; he should have asked my leave to use my name as a means to catch the child, for it was I i.e., it was my rank, etc., as described by Agamemnon, that carried the day, and, such being the case, I ought to have had some voice in the matter. (Paley.) chiefly who induced Clytemnestra to betroth her daughter to me;


naneager to have my love Reading οὐ for ἧ , and regarding μυρίαι—τοὐμὸν as parenthetical, which in the main is the view taken by Nauck and Klotz of this very nnsatisfactory passage. Paley, regarding it as an interpolation, disdains to emend it. —no! but king Agamemnon has put an insult on me; he should have asked my leave to use my name as a means to catch the child, for it was I i.e., it was my rank, etc., as described by Agamemnon, that carried the day, and, such being the case, I ought to have had some voice in the matter. (Paley.) chiefly who induced Clytemnestra to betroth her daughter to me;


naneager to have my love Reading οὐ for ἧ , and regarding μυρίαι—τοὐμὸν as parenthetical, which in the main is the view taken by Nauck and Klotz of this very nnsatisfactory passage. Paley, regarding it as an interpolation, disdains to emend it. —no! but king Agamemnon has put an insult on me; he should have asked my leave to use my name as a means to catch the child, for it was I i.e., it was my rank, etc., as described by Agamemnon, that carried the day, and, such being the case, I ought to have had some voice in the matter. (Paley.) chiefly who induced Clytemnestra to betroth her daughter to me;


nanI would had yielded this to Hellas , if that was where our going to Ilium broke down; I would never have refused to further my fellow soldiers’ common interest. But as it is, I am as nothing in the eyes of those chieftains, and little they care of treating me well or ill.


nanI would had yielded this to Hellas , if that was where our going to Ilium broke down; I would never have refused to further my fellow soldiers’ common interest. But as it is, I am as nothing in the eyes of those chieftains, and little they care of treating me well or ill.


nanI would had yielded this to Hellas , if that was where our going to Ilium broke down; I would never have refused to further my fellow soldiers’ common interest. But as it is, I am as nothing in the eyes of those chieftains, and little they care of treating me well or ill.


nanI would had yielded this to Hellas , if that was where our going to Ilium broke down; I would never have refused to further my fellow soldiers’ common interest. But as it is, I am as nothing in the eyes of those chieftains, and little they care of treating me well or ill.


nanI would had yielded this to Hellas , if that was where our going to Ilium broke down; I would never have refused to further my fellow soldiers’ common interest. But as it is, I am as nothing in the eyes of those chieftains, and little they care of treating me well or ill.


nanMy sword shall soon know if any one is to snatch your daughter from me, for then will I make it reek with the bloody stains of slaughter, before it reach Phrygia . Porson, whom Monk follows, corrects this passage thus: ὃν, πρὶν εἰσ᾽ Φρύγας | ἐλθεῖν φόνον, κλῖσιν αἵματος χρανῶ , an ingenious but not absolutely necessary emendation. Calm yourself then; as a god in his might I appeared to you, without being so, but such will I show myself for all that. Chorus Leader


nanMy sword shall soon know if any one is to snatch your daughter from me, for then will I make it reek with the bloody stains of slaughter, before it reach Phrygia . Porson, whom Monk follows, corrects this passage thus: ὃν, πρὶν εἰσ᾽ Φρύγας | ἐλθεῖν φόνον, κλῖσιν αἵματος χρανῶ , an ingenious but not absolutely necessary emendation. Calm yourself then; as a god in his might I appeared to you, without being so, but such will I show myself for all that. Chorus Leader


nanMy sword shall soon know if any one is to snatch your daughter from me, for then will I make it reek with the bloody stains of slaughter, before it reach Phrygia . Porson, whom Monk follows, corrects this passage thus: ὃν, πρὶν εἰσ᾽ Φρύγας | ἐλθεῖν φόνον, κλῖσιν αἵματος χρανῶ , an ingenious but not absolutely necessary emendation. Calm yourself then; as a god in his might I appeared to you, without being so, but such will I show myself for all that. Chorus Leader


nanMy sword shall soon know if any one is to snatch your daughter from me, for then will I make it reek with the bloody stains of slaughter, before it reach Phrygia . Porson, whom Monk follows, corrects this passage thus: ὃν, πρὶν εἰσ᾽ Φρύγας | ἐλθεῖν φόνον, κλῖσιν αἵματος χρανῶ , an ingenious but not absolutely necessary emendation. Calm yourself then; as a god in his might I appeared to you, without being so, but such will I show myself for all that. Chorus Leader


nanMy sword shall soon know if any one is to snatch your daughter from me, for then will I make it reek with the bloody stains of slaughter, before it reach Phrygia . Porson, whom Monk follows, corrects this passage thus: ὃν, πρὶν εἰσ᾽ Φρύγας | ἐλθεῖν φόνον, κλῖσιν αἵματος χρανῶ , an ingenious but not absolutely necessary emendation. Calm yourself then; as a god in his might I appeared to you, without being so, but such will I show myself for all that. Chorus Leader


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 567, 566 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

566. ἰὼ Λάμαχ' ὦ βλέπων ἀστραπάς
2. Euripides, Andromache, 891, 900, 911, 914, 920-950, 1032 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1032. μαντόσυνον, ὅτε νιν ̓Αργόθεν πορευθεὶς
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 1115-1124, 182, 42, 1031 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1031. ὦναξ Βρόμιε, θεὸς φαίνῃ μέγας. Ἄγγελος 1031. Lord Bacchus, truly you appear to be a great god. Messenger
4. Euripides, Hecuba, 901, 919, 923-925, 934-936, 946-955, 900 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

900. νῦν δ', οὐ γὰρ ἵης' οὐρίους πνοὰς θεός 900. but as it is, for the god sends forth no favoring breeze, the army must wait and look for a calm voyage. Good luck to you, for this is the interest alike of individual and state, that the wrong-doer be punished and the good man prosper. Agamemnon departs as Hecuba withdraws into the tent. Choru
5. Euripides, Helen, 10-11, 118, 12, 1240, 1243, 13, 132, 138, 14-16, 160-161, 164-169, 17, 170-173, 18-19, 198, 2, 20-25, 250, 26, 262-263, 27, 275-276, 28-29, 3, 30, 309, 31-32, 327, 33-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-54, 543, 55-59, 6, 60-67, 7, 73, 8, 894-899, 9, 900-943, 947-948, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. Νείλου μὲν αἵδε καλλιπάρθενοι ῥοαί 1. These are the lovely pure streams of the Nile , which waters the plain and lands of Egypt , fed by white melting snow instead of rain from heaven. Proteus was king of this land when he was alive
6. Euripides, Ion, 1313-1319, 1333-1334, 1312 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1312. Oh! ’tis passing strange how badly the deity hath enacted laws for mortal men, contrary to all sound judgment; for instance, they should ne’er have suffered impious men to sit at their altars
7. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1007-1008, 1214, 1260, 900-919, 921-974, 1006 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 1062, 369, 1061 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Medea, 710-713, 719-756, 709 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Orestes, 383-469, 479-481, 491-541, 544, 671-716, 382 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 262 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 2-3, 31-40, 46, 48, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1181 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1181. First of all, put your right hand in mine. Hyllus:


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absent oaths, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
achilles Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 151, 152, 153
address, hymnic Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 153
aegeus and medea Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
agamemnon Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 151
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 826
apollo Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 826
approximation, to the gods Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 151
artemis, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
artemis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 826
athena Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 153
bacchae Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 826
clytaemestra Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
clytemnestra Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 151, 152, 153
comparisons, with heroes and gods Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 151, 152
dative, of subjective impressions Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 152
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 826
dionysus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 152
earth (gaia/ge), oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
epiphany Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 152
gestures, of supplication Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 153
gregory, j. xxi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 408
handclasping (dexiōsis), sanctifying gesture Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 826
hyllus, oath with heracles Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
hymn Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 153
hypomnesis Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 153
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 408
invocation, hymnic Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 151, 153
iphigeneia Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
iphigenia at aulis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 408, 826
medea, oath with aegeus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
oedipus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 153
prayer Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 153
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 826
requests, hymnic Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 153
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 826
statues, proximity to during oaths' Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
supplication Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 826; Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 151, 152, 153
thebes, theban Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 153
uranus (heaven), vengeance Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
vision, supplicatory visions Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 152
zeus hikesios Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 29
βροτόϲ Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 153
φαίνεϲθαι Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 152
ϲώιζειν, ϲωτήρ Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 151, 153