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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5628
Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1577


nanand grant us safe sailing for our ships and the sack of Troy ’s towers by our spears.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.443-1.447, 1.452, 1.458-1.466, 1.474, 2.404-2.407, 2.412-2.431, 6.301 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.443. /and place in the arms of her dear father, saying to him:Chryses, Agamemnon, king of men, sent me forth to bring to you your daughter, and to offer to Phoebus a holy hecatomb on the Danaans' behalf, that therewith we may propitiate the lord, who has now brought upon the Argives woeful lamentation. 1.444. /and place in the arms of her dear father, saying to him:Chryses, Agamemnon, king of men, sent me forth to bring to you your daughter, and to offer to Phoebus a holy hecatomb on the Danaans' behalf, that therewith we may propitiate the lord, who has now brought upon the Argives woeful lamentation. 1.445. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.446. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.447. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.452. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.458. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.459. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Then, when they had prayed, and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads, and cut their throats, and flayed them, and cut out the thighs and covered them 1.460. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.461. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.462. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.463. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.464. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.465. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.466. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.474. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 2.404. /And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host 2.405. /Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. 2.406. /Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. 2.407. /Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. 2.412. /About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke 2.413. /About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke 2.414. /About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke 2.415. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.416. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.417. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.418. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.419. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. So spake he; but not as yet would the son of Cronos grant him fulfillment; 2.420. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.421. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.422. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.423. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.424. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.425. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.426. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.427. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.428. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.429. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.430. /Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 2.431. /Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 6.301. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus:
2. Homer, Odyssey, 3.430-3.463, 3.472 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aristophanes, Birds, 1022-1054, 848-903, 954-955, 958-991, 1021 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1021. ποῦ πρόξενοι; τίς ὁ Σαρδανάπαλλος οὑτοσί;
4. Aristophanes, Peace, 1019, 1043-1125, 960, 962-963, 976, 978-987, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1005. καὶ Κωπᾴδων ἐλθεῖν σπυρίδας
5. Euripides, Andromache, 694-698, 693 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

693. οἴμοι, καθ' ̔Ελλάδ' ὡς κακῶς νομίζεται:
6. Euripides, Electra, 823 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

823. λευκὰς ἐγύμνου σάρκας ἐκτείνων χέρα:
7. Euripides, Hecuba, 1555-1600, 1612-1613, 658, 1544 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 399-401, 776, 778-783, 937, 398 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 48-50, 47 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1541-1576, 1578-1613, 542, 590-606, 1540 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1540. Dear mistress, you shall learn all clearly; from the outset will I tell it, unless my memory fails me somewhat and confuses my tongue in its account. As soon as we reached the grove of Artemis, the child of Zeus, and the flowery meadows
11. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 21, 4-9, 19 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Orestes, 924-930, 923 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1258, 1257 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 648, 647 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

647. How did the son of Aegeus and his fellow-warriors raise their trophy to Zeus? Tell us, for thou wert there and canst gladden us who were not. Messenger
15. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 5.3.9 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5.3.9. After this Clearchus gathered together his own soldiers, those who had come over to him, and any others who wanted to be present, and spoke as follows: Fellow-soldiers, it is clear that the relation of Cyrus to us is precisely the same as ours to him; that is, we are no longer his soldiers, since we decline to follow him, and likewise he is no longer our paymaster. 5.3.9. Here Xenophon built an altar and a temple with the sacred money, and from that time forth he would every year take the tithe of the products of the land in their season and offer sacrifice to the goddess, all the citizens and the men and women of the neighbourhood taking part in the festival. And the goddess would provide for the banqueters barley meal and loaves of bread, wine and sweetmeats, and a portion of the sacrificial victims from the sacred herd as well as of the victims taken in the chase.
16. Menander, Dyscolus, 405, 407-418, 432, 404 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

17. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 1.6.43-1.6.45 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.6.43. Usage remains to be discussed. For it would be almost laughable to prefer the language of the past to that of the present day, and what is ancient speech but ancient usage of speaking? But even here the critical faculty is necessary, and we must make up our minds what we mean by usage. 1.6.44.  If it be defined merely as the practice of the majority, we shall have a very dangerous rule affecting not merely style but life as well, a far more serious matter. For where is so much good to be found that what is right should please the majority? The practices of depilation, of dressing the hair in tiers, or of drinking in excess at the baths, although they may have thrust their way into society, cannot claim the support of usage, since there is something to blame in all of them (although we have usage on our side when we bathe or have our hair cut or take our meals together). So too in speech we must not accept as a rule of language words and phrases that have become a vicious habit with a number of persons. 1.6.45.  To say nothing of the language of the uneducated, we are all of us well aware that whole theatres and the entire crowd of spectators will often commit barbarisms in the cries which they utter as one man. I will therefore define usage in speech as the agreed practice of educated men, just as where our way of life is concerned I should define it as the agreed practice of all good men.
18. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 3.5.2 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

19. Lucian, Sacrifices, 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7.18.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.18.11. Every year too the people of Patrae celebrate the festival Laphria in honor of their Artemis, and at it they employ a method of sacrifice peculiar to the place. Round the altar in a circle they set up logs of wood still green, each of them sixteen cubits long. On the altar within the circle is placed the driest of their wood. Just before the time of the festival they construct a smooth ascent to the altar, piling earth upon the altar steps.
21. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 4.10 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agamemnon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830; Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 166
alimentary system Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830
andromeda Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 397
argos, argive Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 166
artemis, ephesia Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
artemis, laphria Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
artemis Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 397, 830
athena Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15, 20
bremmer, j. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 20
burkert, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15, 20
clytemnestra Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 166
deer Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
delos Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
detienne, m. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15, 20
deus ex machina Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 397
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830
ennius Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 166
ephesos, hunting at Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
euboea, euboean Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 166
gregory, j. xxi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 397
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 397, 830
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830
hunting Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
invocation, ἰώ Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 166
iphigeneia Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
iphigenia Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 166
iphigenia at aulis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 397, 830
local alimentary systems Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
local variations Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
nestor Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15, 20
orestes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830
parthenon frieze Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 20
pylos Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830
reliefs, votive Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830
robertson smith, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
sacrifice Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830
skillous Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
sophocles, electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830
substitutes, deer as substitute Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830
theano Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15, 20
thesaurus cultus et rituum antiquorum Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830
trojans Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15, 20
troy Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
vernant, j.-p. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15, 20
votive reliefs' Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 53
zeus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 830