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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5627
Euripides, Ion, 551-553


κᾆτα πῶς ἀφικόμεσθα δεῦρο —Didst thou lodge with one of the public hosts? Xuthu


ἐς φανάς γε Βακχίου.Didst thou lodge with one of the public hosts? Xuthu


ταῦτ' ἀμηχανῶ.Initiated thee? or what is it thou sayest? Xuthu


προξένων δ' ἔν του κατέσχες;Initiated thee? or what is it thou sayest? Xuthu


διὰ μακρᾶς ἐλθὼν κελεύθου;Wert thou sober, or in thy cups? Xuthu


ὅς με Δελφίσιν κόραις . . .Wert thou sober, or in thy cups? Xuthu


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 23-26, 22 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

22. σέβω δὲ νύμφας, ἔνθα Κωρυκὶς πέτρα
2. Aristophanes, Birds, 1021 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1021. ποῦ πρόξενοι; τίς ὁ Σαρδανάπαλλος οὑτοσί;
3. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 2-3, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1. ἀλλ' εἴ τις ἐς Βακχεῖον αὐτὰς ἐκάλεσεν
4. Aristophanes, Clouds, 604-606, 603 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

603. Παρνασσίαν θ' ὃς κατέχων
5. Euripides, Andromache, 699-702, 1103 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1103. σὺν προξένοισι μάντεσίν τε Πυθικοῖς.
6. Euripides, Bacchae, 222-225, 297-300, 686-688, 221 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

221. πλήρεις δὲ θιάσοις ἐν μέσοισιν ἑστάναι
7. Euripides, Hecuba, 1260 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1260. μῶν ναυστολήσῃ γῆς ὅρους ̔Ελληνίδος; 1260. Shall convey me to the shores of Hellas ? Polymestor
8. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1417-1422, 1416 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1416. Enough! for though thou pass to gloom beneath the earth, the wrath of Cypris shall not, at her will, fall on thee unrequited, because thou hadst a noble righteous soul. Nauck encloses this line in brackets.
9. Euripides, Ion, 1122-1128, 13, 335, 369, 414, 550, 552-553, 625-626, 714-718, 1039 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1039. Go thou within the house of our public hosts;
10. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1260 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1260. and the numbers of bronze-clad warriors from Hellas, who can neither make their way to Ilium ’s towers nor raze the far-famed citadel of Troy , unless I offer you according to the word of Calchas the seer. The following passage from 1. 1264-75 is regarded by Dindorf as spurious. Hennig thinks 1. 1269 and ll. 1271-75 are genuine. Some mad desire possesses the army of Hella
11. Herodotus, Histories, 8.136, 8.143 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8.136. Mardonius read whatever was said in the oracles, and presently he sent a messenger to Athens, Alexander, a Macedonian, son of Amyntas. Him he sent, partly because the Persians were akin to him; Bubares, a Persian, had taken to wife Gygaea Alexander's sister and Amyntas' daughter, who had borne to him that Amyntas of Asia who was called by the name of his mother's father, and to whom the king gave Alabanda a great city in Phrygia for his dwelling. Partly too he sent him because he learned that Alexander was a protector and benefactor to the Athenians. ,It was thus that he supposed he could best gain the Athenians for his allies, of whom he heard that they were a numerous and valiant people, and knew that they had been the chief authors of the calamities which had befallen the Persians at sea. ,If he gained their friendship he thought he would easily become master of the seas, as truly he would have been. On land he supposed himself to be by much the stronger, and he accordingly reckoned that thus he would have the upper hand of the Greeks. This chanced to be the prediction of the oracles which counseled him to make the Athenians his ally. It was in obedience to this that he sent his messenger. 8.143. But to Alexander the Athenians replied as follows: “We know of ourselves that the power of the Mede is many times greater than ours. There is no need to taunt us with that. Nevertheless in our zeal for freedom we will defend ourselves to the best of our ability. But as regards agreements with the barbarian, do not attempt to persuade us to enter into them, nor will we consent. ,Now carry this answer back to Mardonius from the Athenians, that as long as the sun holds the course by which he now goes, we will make no agreement with Xerxes. We will fight against him without ceasing, trusting in the aid of the gods and the heroes whom he has disregarded and burnt their houses and their adornments. ,Come no more to Athenians with such a plea, nor under the semblance of rendering us a service, counsel us to act wickedly. For we do not want those who are our friends and protectors to suffer any harm at Athenian hands.”
12. Sophocles, Antigone, 1126 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.259, 19.199 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

15. Livy, History, 39.8.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

16. Plutarch, On The E At Delphi, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

364e. from the nature of Osiris and the ceremony of finding him. That Osiris is identical with Dionysus who could more fittingly know than yourself, Clea? For you are at the head of the inspired maidens of Delphi, and have been consecrated by your father and mother in the holy rites of Osiris. If, however, for the benefit of others it is needful to adduce proofs of this identity, let us leave undisturbed what may not be told, but the public ceremonies which the priests perform in the burial of the Apis, when they convey his body on an improvised bier, do not in any way come short of a Bacchic procession; for they fasten skins of fawns about themselves, and carry Bacchic wand
18. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
19. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.6.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.6.4. Others maintain that Castalius, an aboriginal, had a daughter Thyia, who was the first to be priestess of Dionysus and celebrate orgies in honor of the god. It is said that later on men called after her Thyiads all women who rave in honor of Dionysus. At any rate they hold that Delphus was a son of Apollo and Thyia. Others say that his mother was Melaena, daughter of Cephisus.
20. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.18.6 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

21. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.18.6 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

22. Epigraphy, Lsam, 48



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander i Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 52
aphrodite Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 85
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 291
apollo Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 85
archegetes ἀρχηγέτης Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
aristoteles, son of chelonius Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 52
artemis/diana Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 85
attica, attic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
bassaras, bassarides, bassarae Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
caryatids Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
cave, corycian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
cave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
classical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
column of the dancers Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
comedy, comic technique Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 112
corycia, corycian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
cults, mysteries Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 112
dadaphorios month Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 291
delphi Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 85
dionysism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
dionysos, arrival Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
dionysos, dionysos baccheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
dionysos, dionysos liknites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 291
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
enthusiasm ἐνθουσιασμός, enthusiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
eretria Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 52
euergetês, euergetai, title Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 52
euergetês, euergetai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 52
euripides, dramas by\n, hypsipyle Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 204
euripides, dramas by\n, ion Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 204
female Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
frenzy, frenzied Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
hades place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 291
helios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
henotheism, henotheistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
lycurgus (king of nemea) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 204
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
mystic, mystical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
oracle, oracular Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
orpheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 85; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
orphics Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
pangaeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
parnassus, parnassian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 291
priest, priesthood Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
priestess Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
priests, of mystery cults Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 112
priests/priestesses Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 204
proxenia, proxenoi, and euergesia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 52
proxenia, proxenoi, and xenia (ritualized friendship) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 52
proxenia, proxenoi, as reward Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 52
proxenia, proxenoi, evolution of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 52
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
pythagoreanism, pythagorean Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
pythia (oracle) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 204
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 291
sanctuary Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
sun Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
temple Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
thrace Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 85
thracia, thracian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
thyiads, thyiades Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
vases, attic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
worship' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
xenia (ritualized friendship) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 52
zagreus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
zopyrus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63