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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5627
Euripides, Ion, 1075-1077


μνον θεόν, εἰ παρὰ καλλιχόροισι παγαῖςif this stranger is to witness the torch-dance, that heralds in the twentieth dawn, around Callichorus’ fair springs, a sleepless votary in midnight revels, what time the star-lit firmament of Zeus


λαμπάδα θεωρὸν εἰκάδωνif this stranger is to witness the torch-dance, that heralds in the twentieth dawn, around Callichorus’ fair springs, a sleepless votary in midnight revels, what time the star-lit firmament of Zeus


ὄψεται ἐννύχιος ἄυπνος ὤν, ὅτεif this stranger is to witness the torch-dance, that heralds in the twentieth dawn, around Callichorus’ fair springs, a sleepless votary in midnight revels, what time the star-lit firmament of Zeus


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Aristophanes, Frogs, 343, 335 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

335. χαρίτων πλεῖστον ἔχουσαν μέρος, ἁγνάν, ἱερὰν
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 725 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

725. Ἴακχον ἀθρόῳ στόματι τὸν Διὸς γόνον 725. calling on Iacchus, the son of Zeus, Bromius, with united voice. The whole mountain revelled along with them and the beasts, and nothing was unmoved by their running. Agave happened to be leaping near me, and I sprang forth, wanting to snatch her
3. Euripides, Cyclops, 70, 69 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

69. φᾶν ἴακχον ἴακχον ᾠ-
4. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 613 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

613. In fight; for I had been lucky enough to witness the rites of the initiated. Amphitryon
5. Euripides, Hippolytus, 25 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

25. to witness the solemn mystic rites and be initiated therein in Pandion’s land, i.e. Attica. Phaedra, his father’s noble wife, caught sight of him, and by my designs she found her heart was seized with wild desire.
6. Euripides, Ion, 1049, 1056-1060, 1068-1074, 1076-1086, 1048 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1048. Daughter of Demeter, goddess of highways, queen as thou art of haunting powers of darkness
7. Herodotus, Histories, 5.74-5.77 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.74. Cleomenes, however, fully aware that the Athenians had done him wrong in word and deed, mustered an army from the whole of the Peloponnesus. He did not declare the purpose for which he mustered it, namely to avenge himself on the Athenian people and set up Isagoras, who had come with him out of the acropolis, as tyrant. ,Cleomenes broke in as far as Eleusis with a great host, and the Boeotians, by a concerted plan, took Oenoe and Hysiae, districts on the borders of Attica, while the Chalcidians attacked on another side and raided lands in Attica. The Athenians, who were now caught in a ring of foes, decided to oppose the Spartans at Eleusis and to deal with the Boeotians and Chalcidians later. 5.75. When the armies were about to join battle, the Corinthians, coming to the conclusion that they were acting wrongly, changed their minds and departed. Later Demaratus son of Ariston, the other king of Sparta, did likewise, despite the fact that he had come with Cleomenes from Lacedaemon in joint command of the army and had not till now been at variance with him. ,As a result of this dissension, a law was made at Sparta that when an army was despatched, both kings would not be permitted to go with it. Until that time they had both gone together, but now one of the kings was released from service and one of the sons of Tyndarus too could be left at home. Before that time, both of these also were asked to give aid and went with the army. ,So now at Eleusis, when the rest of the allies saw that the Lacedaemonian kings were not of one mind and that the Corinthians had left their host, they too went off. 5.76. This was the fourth time that Dorians had come into Attica. They had come twice as invaders in war and twice as helpers of the Athenian people. The first time was when they planted a settlement at Megara (this expedition may rightly be said to have been in the reign of Codrus), the second and third when they set out from Sparta to drive out the sons of Pisistratus, and the fourth was now, when Cleomenes broke in as far as Eleusis with his following of Peloponnesians. This was accordingly the fourth Dorian invasion of Athens. 5.77. When this force then had been ingloriously scattered, the Athenians first marched against the Chalcidians to punish them. The Boeotians came to the Euripus to help the Chalcidians and as soon as the Athenians saw these allies, they resolved to attack the Boeotians before the Chalcidians. ,When they met the Boeotians in battle, they won a great victory, slaying very many and taking seven hundred of them prisoner. On that same day the Athenians crossed to Euboea where they met the Chalcidians too in battle, and after overcoming them as well, they left four thousand tet farmers on the lands of the horse-breeders. ,Horse-breeders was the name given to the men of substance among the Chalcidians. They fettered as many of these as they took alive and kept them imprisoned with the captive Boeotians. In time, however, they set them free, each for an assessed ransom of two minae. The fetters in which the prisoners had been bound they hung up in the acropolis, where they could still be seen in my time hanging from walls which the Persians' fire had charred, opposite the temple which faces west. ,Moreover, they made a dedication of a tenth part of the ransom, and this money was used for the making of a four-horse chariot which stands on the left hand of the entrance into the outer porch of the acropolis and bears this inscription: quote type="inscription" l met="dact" Athens with Chalcis and Boeotia fought, /l lBound them in chains and brought their pride to naught. /l lPrison was grief, and ransom cost them dear- /l lOne tenth to Pallas raised this chariot here. /l /quote
8. Demosthenes, Orations, 18 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 34 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Aeschines, Or., 2.158



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 88
apollo Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 847
arguments, religious, religious significance of Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 88
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 847
boedromion month Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
calendars, boedromion Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 104
chalchis Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 104
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
crown, honorary Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 88
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
dadouchos δᾳδοῦχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
death associated with dionysos and dionysian cult or myth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 847
demeter Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 847
denigration, after chaeroneia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 88
dionysia, city (great) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 847
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 847
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
earth, earthly Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
eleusis, eleusinian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
eleusis, mysteries Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 104
eleusis Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 104; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 847
gods, goodwill Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 88
hades place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
hiera Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 104
hippobotai Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 104
iacchos ἴακχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
iakchos Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 104
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
kallichoros Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 104
lenaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
mystical religion Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 847
night, nocturnal, rites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
pericles Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 104
persephone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
plutarch Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 104
politics, issues taken up in court Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 88
promise Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
rite, ritual, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
rite, ritual, of passage Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
semenzato, c. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 847
torch, torchlight Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
torch-bearer Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
tyche (fortune), agathe tyche Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 88
tyche (fortune), demosthenes Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 88
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281
worshippers' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 281