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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5625
Euripides, Hippolytus, 943-959


σκέψασθε δ' ἐς τόνδ', ὅστις ἐξ ἐμοῦ γεγὼςin villainy, the gods will have to add another sphere unto the world, which shall take in the knaves and villains.


ᾔσχυνε τἀμὰ λέκτρα κἀξελέγχεταιin villainy, the gods will have to add another sphere unto the world, which shall take in the knaves and villains.


πρὸς τῆς θανούσης ἐμφανῶς κάκιστος ὤν.by my dead wife. Now, since thou hast dared this loathly crime, come, look thy father in the face. Art thou the man who dost with gods consort, as one above the vulgar herd? art thou the chaste and sinless saint?


δεῖξον δ', ἐπειδή γ' ἐς μίασμ' ἐλήλυθαby my dead wife. Now, since thou hast dared this loathly crime, come, look thy father in the face. Art thou the man who dost with gods consort, as one above the vulgar herd? art thou the chaste and sinless saint?


τὸ σὸν πρόσωπον δεῦρ' ἐναντίον πατρί.by my dead wife. Now, since thou hast dared this loathly crime, come, look thy father in the face. Art thou the man who dost with gods consort, as one above the vulgar herd? art thou the chaste and sinless saint?


σὺ δὴ θεοῖσιν ὡς περισσὸς ὢν ἀνὴρby my dead wife. Now, since thou hast dared this loathly crime, come, look thy father in the face. Art thou the man who dost with gods consort, as one above the vulgar herd? art thou the chaste and sinless saint?


ξύνει; σὺ σώφρων καὶ κακῶν ἀκήρατος;by my dead wife. Now, since thou hast dared this loathly crime, come, look thy father in the face. Art thou the man who dost with gods consort, as one above the vulgar herd? art thou the chaste and sinless saint?


οὐκ ἂν πιθοίμην τοῖσι σοῖς κόμποις ἐγὼThy boasts will never persuade me to be guilty of attributing ignorance to gods. Go then, vaunt thyself, and drive1 Hippolytus is here taunted with being an exponent of the Orphic mysteries. Apparently Orpheus, like Pythagoras, taught the necessity of total abstinence from animal food. thy petty trade in viands formed of lifeless food; take Orpheus for thy chief and go a-revelling, with all honour for the vapourings of many a written scroll


θεοῖσι προσθεὶς ἀμαθίαν φρονεῖν κακῶς.Thy boasts will never persuade me to be guilty of attributing ignorance to gods. Go then, vaunt thyself, and drive1 Hippolytus is here taunted with being an exponent of the Orphic mysteries. Apparently Orpheus, like Pythagoras, taught the necessity of total abstinence from animal food. thy petty trade in viands formed of lifeless food; take Orpheus for thy chief and go a-revelling, with all honour for the vapourings of many a written scroll


ἤδη νυν αὔχει καὶ δι' ἀψύχου βορᾶςThy boasts will never persuade me to be guilty of attributing ignorance to gods. Go then, vaunt thyself, and drive1 Hippolytus is here taunted with being an exponent of the Orphic mysteries. Apparently Orpheus, like Pythagoras, taught the necessity of total abstinence from animal food. thy petty trade in viands formed of lifeless food; take Orpheus for thy chief and go a-revelling, with all honour for the vapourings of many a written scroll


σίτοις καπήλευ' ̓Ορφέα τ' ἄνακτ' ἔχωνThy boasts will never persuade me to be guilty of attributing ignorance to gods. Go then, vaunt thyself, and drive1 Hippolytus is here taunted with being an exponent of the Orphic mysteries. Apparently Orpheus, like Pythagoras, taught the necessity of total abstinence from animal food. thy petty trade in viands formed of lifeless food; take Orpheus for thy chief and go a-revelling, with all honour for the vapourings of many a written scroll


βάκχευε πολλῶν γραμμάτων τιμῶν καπνούς:Thy boasts will never persuade me to be guilty of attributing ignorance to gods. Go then, vaunt thyself, and drive1 Hippolytus is here taunted with being an exponent of the Orphic mysteries. Apparently Orpheus, like Pythagoras, taught the necessity of total abstinence from animal food. thy petty trade in viands formed of lifeless food; take Orpheus for thy chief and go a-revelling, with all honour for the vapourings of many a written scroll


ἐπεί γ' ἐλήφθης. τοὺς δὲ τοιούτους ἐγὼeeing thou now art caught. Let all beware, I say, of such hypocrites! who hunt their prey with fine words, and all the while are scheming villainy. She is dead; dost think that this will save thee? Why this convicts thee more than all, abandoned wretch!


φεύγειν προφωνῶ πᾶσι: θηρεύουσι γὰρeeing thou now art caught. Let all beware, I say, of such hypocrites! who hunt their prey with fine words, and all the while are scheming villainy. She is dead; dost think that this will save thee? Why this convicts thee more than all, abandoned wretch!


σεμνοῖς λόγοισιν, αἰσχρὰ μηχανώμενοι.eeing thou now art caught. Let all beware, I say, of such hypocrites! who hunt their prey with fine words, and all the while are scheming villainy. She is dead; dost think that this will save thee? Why this convicts thee more than all, abandoned wretch!


τέθνηκεν ἥδε: τοῦτό ς' ἐκσώσειν δοκεῖς;eeing thou now art caught. Let all beware, I say, of such hypocrites! who hunt their prey with fine words, and all the while are scheming villainy. She is dead; dost think that this will save thee? Why this convicts thee more than all, abandoned wretch!


ἐν τῷδ' ἁλίσκῃ πλεῖστον, ὦ κάκιστε σύ:eeing thou now art caught. Let all beware, I say, of such hypocrites! who hunt their prey with fine words, and all the while are scheming villainy. She is dead; dost think that this will save thee? Why this convicts thee more than all, abandoned wretch!


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

1 results
1. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1001-1020, 1022, 1025-1064, 1068-1081, 1093, 809, 917, 920-931, 944-959, 962-972, 974-975, 981-991, 995-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. to mock at friends is not my way, father, but I am still the same behind their backs as to their face. The very crime thou thinkest to catch me in, is just the one I am untainted with, for to this day have I kept me pure from women. Nor know I aught thereof, save what I hear


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
antiphon, anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
aphrodite Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
deception, and tragedy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
deception, association with rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
euripides, depiction of theseus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
euripides, forensic language in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
euripides, hippolytus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
euripides, on lie-detection Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
euripides, on rhetoric of anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
euripides, on two voices Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
hippolytus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
mueller, m. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
phaedra Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
rhetoric, of anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
sophistry, in euripides Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
sôphrosynê' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
theseus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277