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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5625
Euripides, Hippolytus, 1079


εἴθ' ἦν ἐμαυτὸν προσβλέπειν ἐναντίονAlas! Would I could stand and face myself, so should I weep to see the sorrows I endure. Theseu


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 24.723-24.745 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

24.723. /laid him on a corded bedstead, and by his side set singers, leaders of the dirge, who led the song of lamentation—they chanted the dirge, and thereat the women made lament. And amid these white-armed Andromache led the wailing, holding in her arms the while the head of man-slaying Hector: 24.724. /laid him on a corded bedstead, and by his side set singers, leaders of the dirge, who led the song of lamentation—they chanted the dirge, and thereat the women made lament. And amid these white-armed Andromache led the wailing, holding in her arms the while the head of man-slaying Hector: 24.725. / Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover 24.726. / Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover 24.727. / Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover 24.728. / Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover 24.729. / Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover 24.730. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.731. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.732. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.733. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.734. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.735. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.736. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.737. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.738. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.739. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.740. /Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.741. /Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.742. /Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.743. /Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.744. /Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.745. /I might have pondered night and day with shedding of tears.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 8.490, 8.517-8.520, 9.14-9.15 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Fragments, 1079, 1078 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Helen, 34, 583, 73, 875, 930, 33 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

33. δίδωσι δ' οὐκ ἔμ', ἀλλ' ὁμοιώσας' ἐμοὶ
5. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1001-1020, 1022, 1025-1064, 1068-1078, 1080-1081, 1093, 1102-1103, 1120-1125, 1145-1146, 1205-1217, 1272-1273, 1286-1289, 1318-1324, 172, 302-305, 315, 35, 415, 428-430, 443, 447-448, 522, 611-612, 792, 917, 920-931, 943-959, 962-972, 974-975, 981-991, 995-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. to mock at friends is not my way, father, but I am still the same behind their backs as to their face. The very crime thou thinkest to catch me in, is just the one I am untainted with, for to this day have I kept me pure from women. Nor know I aught thereof, save what I hear
6. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1122, 1121 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, evolution of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
aidôs Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 125
anger, in greek epic Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
anger of achilles Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
aphrodite, in the hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
aphrodite Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 125; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
artemis Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
athens Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
conscience Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 125
curse (ara), abuse of Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
demodocus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
eleos/eleeo and aristotle, in homer Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
epic poetry, greek Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
euripides, helen Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 54
euripides, hippolytus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 54
exile Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
glossa, distinct from mind Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
hector, mourned by andromache Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
helen, and double Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 54
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
hippolytus Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 125; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127, 275; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 54
homer/homeric Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
kakos, theseus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
menelaus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
mimesis Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 54
mourning Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
mueller, m. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
odysseus, and demodocus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
phaedra Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 125; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
phren/phrenes, seat of purity/impurity, in the hippolytus' Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
pity, of achilles Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
pity, self-pity Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
pleasure Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 125
poe, j.p. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 275
poseidon Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
statues, as double Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 54
suffering, of odysseus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
sôphrosynê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
teuker Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 54
theseus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 275
troy/trojans Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
trozen Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 209
zeitlin, froma Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 54