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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5625
Euripides, Hippolytus, 1029


[ἄπολις ἄοικος, φυγὰς ἀλητεύων χθόνα,]Now by Zeus, the god of oaths, and by the earth, whereon we stand, I swear to thee I never did lay hand upon thy wife nor would have wished to, or have harboured such a thought Slay me, ye gods! rob me of name and honour, from home and city cast me forth, a wandering exile o’er the earth!


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.257-2.264, 2.731, 3.245-3.301, 5.212-5.216, 19.175-19.177, 19.196-19.197, 19.242-19.268 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.257. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.258. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.259. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.260. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.261. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.262. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.263. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.264. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.731. /and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. 3.245. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.246. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.247. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.248. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.249. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.250. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.251. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.252. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.253. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.254. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.255. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.256. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.257. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.258. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.259. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.260. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.261. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.262. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.263. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.264. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. But when they were now come to the Trojans and Achaeans 3.265. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.266. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.267. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.268. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.269. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.270. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.271. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.272. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.273. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.274. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.275. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.276. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.277. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.278. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.279. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.280. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.281. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.282. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.283. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.284. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.285. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.286. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.287. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.288. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.289. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.290. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.291. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.292. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.293. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.294. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.295. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.296. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.297. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.298. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.299. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.300. /may their brains be thus poured forth upon the ground even as this wine, theirs and their children's; and may their wives be made slaves to others. 3.301. /may their brains be thus poured forth upon the ground even as this wine, theirs and their children's; and may their wives be made slaves to others. 5.212. /on that day when I led my Trojans to lovely Ilios to do pleasure to Hector. But if so be I shall return and behold with mine eyes my native land and my wife and great, high-roofed palace, then may some alien forthwith cut my head from me 5.213. /on that day when I led my Trojans to lovely Ilios to do pleasure to Hector. But if so be I shall return and behold with mine eyes my native land and my wife and great, high-roofed palace, then may some alien forthwith cut my head from me 5.214. /on that day when I led my Trojans to lovely Ilios to do pleasure to Hector. But if so be I shall return and behold with mine eyes my native land and my wife and great, high-roofed palace, then may some alien forthwith cut my head from me 5.215. /if I break not this bow with my hands and cast it into the blazing fire; for worthless as wind doth it attend me. To him then spake in answer Aeneas, leader of the Trojans:Nay, speak not thus; things shall in no wise be any better before that we twain with horses and chariot 5.216. /if I break not this bow with my hands and cast it into the blazing fire; for worthless as wind doth it attend me. To him then spake in answer Aeneas, leader of the Trojans:Nay, speak not thus; things shall in no wise be any better before that we twain with horses and chariot 19.175. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.176. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.177. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.196. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.197. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.242. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.243. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.244. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.245. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.246. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.247. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.248. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.249. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.250. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.251. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.252. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.253. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.254. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.255. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.256. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.257. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.258. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.259. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.260. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.261. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.262. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.263. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.264. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.265. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.266. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.267. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.268. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives:
2. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 764, 773, 762 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

762. ἐγὼ δὲ χώρᾳ τῇδε καὶ τῷ σῷ στρατῷ
3. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 2.86-2.88 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 476-478, 324 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

324. ἐξολοίμην, ἢν ἀκούσω. μηδαμῶς ὦχαρνικοί.
5. Aristophanes, Birds, 445-447, 444 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

444. τόν —; οὐδαμῶς. οὔκ, ἀλλὰ τὠφθαλμὼ λέγω.
6. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 182-238, 181 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

181. τί δῆτα ταῦτ' οὐχ ὡς τάχιστ' ὦ Λαμπιτοῖ
7. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1255 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1255. θήσω πρυτανεῖ' ἢ μηκέτι ζῴην ἐγώ.
8. Aristophanes, Frogs, 586-588, 177 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

177. λάβ' ἐννέ' ὀβολούς. ἀναβιοίην νυν πάλιν.
9. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 272 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

272. ὄμνυμι τοίνυν αἰθέρ' οἴκησιν Διός.
10. Euripides, Andromache, 1101-1113, 1100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1100. ἡμεῖς δὲ μῆλα, φυλλάδος Παρνασίας
11. Euripides, Cyclops, 269-272, 261 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

261. ἐγώ; κακῶς γ' ἄρ' ἐξόλοι'. 261. I? Perdition catch thee! Odysseu
12. Euripides, Electra, 1125-1131, 783-789, 1124 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1124. ἤκουσας, οἶμαι, τῶν ἐμῶν λοχευμάτων: 1124. You have heard, I suppose, that I have given birth;
13. Euripides, Fragments, 1011-1020, 1010 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Euripides, Hecuba, 1196-1207, 1195 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 207 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

207. Πιτθεὺς μέν ἐστι Πέλοπος, ἐκ δὲ Πιτθέως
16. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1001-1028, 1030-1064, 1068-1081, 1093, 1191, 1286-1289, 1298-1300, 1305-1324, 1415-1416, 1423-1430, 44-46, 611-613, 657-658, 689-690, 887-890, 917, 920-931, 943-959, 962-972, 974-975, 981-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. to mock at friends is not my way, father, but I am still the same behind their backs as to their face. The very crime thou thinkest to catch me in, is just the one I am untainted with, for to this day have I kept me pure from women. Nor know I aught thereof, save what I hear
17. Euripides, Ion, 1123-1128, 1132, 1168, 226-229, 665, 1122 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1122. Soon as Xuthus, husband of Creusa, had left the god’s prophetic shrine, taking with him his new-found son, to hold the feast and sacrifice that he designed to offer to the gods
18. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1007, 948-954, 1006 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 737-752, 535 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

20. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 1329, 1389-1390, 163-165, 625-626, 735-755, 764-767, 803-806, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 174, 173 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

173. That, lady, is the prophet Amphiaraus; with him are the victims, earth’s bloodthirsty streams. Antigone
22. Euripides, Rhesus, 816 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

816. For this deed—I have sworn by Zeus our Lord !—
23. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1175, 1187-1204, 1174 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

24. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 250-251, 644-645, 647, 653, 658-665, 669-670, 701, 249 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

25. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 1438, 1437 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

26. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1040, 1181-1189, 1193-1201, 1217, 1220-1248, 383-384, 808-809, 818-820, 1039 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1039. Heal this pain with which your godless mother has enraged me! So may I see her fall to ruin, exactly, just exactly, as she has destroyed me!
27. Aeschines, Letters, 3.110-3.111 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

28. Epigraphy, Ml, 5.40-5.51



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegeus and medea Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
aether invoked Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 291
agon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
alcestis Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
alliances between states Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
aphrodite Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 291
apollo Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
artemis, and hippolytus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 291
asclepius Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
authorial voice, parodies euripides Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 291
chorus, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25, 31
citizenship oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
colophon Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
competitive oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 79
contract, conditional self-curse of oath Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 7, 193, 194
contract, curse Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 193
coronis Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
creon, king, oedipus the king Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 79
critias (tragic poet and politician) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 208
curses Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
cyclops Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 79
cyrene Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
defence Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
deianeira Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
delphi, oaths at Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
delphi Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
demos (knights) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 79
discourse Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
drama Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
earth (gaia/ge), oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 291
eikadeus koine Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
epic Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
epidaurus Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
euripides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
euthynoi Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
glauce (medea) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
gortyn Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
hecuba Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
helios (sun), oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 31
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
heracles Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
heraclidae Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
hippocrates, ancient biographies of Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
hippocrates, belonging to asclepiads Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
hippolytus, other oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 5, 31, 291
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 31, 79
hyllus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
inscribed oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
iocasta Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 31
iole (trachiniae) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
ion Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
iphigeneia Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
jason (medea), curses by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
lichas (trachiniae) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
little iliad Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
lloyd, m. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193, 371
machaon Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
marriage Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
medea, and jasons perjury Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
medea, oath with aegeus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
minos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
mueller, m. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
murder Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
oaths Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
odysseus, curses against Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
oedipus, and creon Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 79
official oaths, citizenship oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
official oaths, phratry oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
official oaths, secretaries Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
official oaths, tagoi Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
oracle Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
orchomenus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
orestes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
pasiphae Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
penelope Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 79
perjury, contemplation of, punished Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 291
perjury Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 194
phaedra Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 5, 31, 79
phaedras nurse Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 5
philoctetes Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
plants as oath witnesses, plataea, oath of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
plato Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 291
plot, oath as plot feature Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 7
poetry Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
poseidon, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 291
poseidon Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 5
reception Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
reconciliation oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
reductio ad absurdum Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
revenge Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
revenge curses Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
sacrifice Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 829
satyr-dramas Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20, 79
secretaries oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
self-curses, hippolytus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 31, 291
self-curses, voluntary Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
silenus (cyclops), oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 79
slave, receiving oaths Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 194
solon (lawmaker and poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 208
sophocles, works, philoctetes Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
sophocles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
sôphrosynê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
thera Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
theseus, and hippolytus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 5, 31, 79, 291
theseus, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 5
theseus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
thessalus Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
tragedy, and medicine' Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
trikka Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
troy Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 67
voluntary self-curses Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
written oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
zeus horkios (guardian of oaths) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 291