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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5625
Euripides, Hippolytus, 102


πρόσωθεν αὐτὴν ἁγνὸς ὢν ἀσπάζομαι.I greet her from afar, preserving still my chastity. Att


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 1006-1078, 1005 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1005. ἰὼ ἰὼ δυστόνων κακῶν, ἄναξ. Ἀντιγόνη 1005. Ah I pity your grievous suffering, my king. Antigone
2. Euripides, Alcestis, 142-212, 836, 141 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

141. Yea, I did pity thee most truly, Trojan dame, when thou earnest to this house; but from fear of my mistress I hold my peace, albeit I sympathize with thee
3. Euripides, Hecuba, 239-248, 229 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 182-183, 181 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

181. ἄναξ, ὑπάρχει γὰρ τόδ' ἐν τῇ σῇ χθονί 181. rend= for we no longer have aught to do with Argos since that decree was passed, but we are exiles from our native land; how then can he justly drag us back as subjects of Mycenae, Mycenae and Argos are used indiscrimately, in the same way that Euripides elsewhere speaks of Greeks as Argives, Achaeans, Hellenes, etc., without distinction. seeing that they have banished us? For we are strangers. Or do ye claim that every exile from Argos is exiled from the bounds of Hellas? Not from Athens surely; for ne’er will she for fear of Argos drive the children of Heracles from her land. Here is no Trachis, not at all; no! nor that Achaean town, whence thou, defying justice, but boasting of the might of Argos in the very words thou now art using, didst drive the suppliants from their station at the altar. If this shall be, and they thy words approve, why then I trow this is no more Athens, the home of freedom. Nay, but I know the temper and nature of these citizens; they would rather die, for honour ranks before mere life with men of worth. Enough of Athens! for excessive praise is apt to breed disgust; and oft ere now I have myself felt vexed at praise that knows no bounds. But to thee, as ruler of this land, I fain would show the reason why thou art bound to save these children. Pittheus was the son of Pelops; from him sprung Aethra, and from her Theseus thy sire was born. And now will I trace back these children’s lineage for thee. Heracles was son of Zeus and Alcmena; Alcmena sprang from Pelops’ daughter; therefore thy father and their father would be the sons of first cousins. Thus then art thou to them related, O Demophon, but thy just debt to them beyond the ties of kinship do I now declare to thee; for I assert, in days gone by, I was with Theseus on the ship, as their father’s squire, when they went to fetch that girdle fraught with death; yea, and from Hades’ murky dungeons did Heracles bring thy father up; as all Hellas doth attest. The following six lines have been condemned by the joint verdict of Paley, Porson, and Dindorf. Wherefore in return they crave this boon of thee, that they be not surrendered up nor torn by force from the altars of thy gods and cast forth from the land. For this were shame on thee, and This line as it stands has a syllable too many for the metre. Hermann omits τε . Wecklein inserts τῇ and omits κακόν . hurtful likewise in thy state, should suppliants, exiles, kith and kin of thine, be haled away by force. For pity’s sake! cast one glance at them. I do entreat thee, laying my suppliant bough upon thee, by thy hands and beard, slight not the sons of Heracles, now that thou hast them in thy power to help. Show thyself their kinsman and their friend; be to them father, brother, lord; for better each and all of these than to fall beneath the Argives’ hand. Choru 181. O king, in thy land I start with this advantage, the right to hear and speak in turn, and none, ere that, will drive me hence as elsewhere they would. ’Twixt us and him is naught in common
5. Euripides, Hippolytus, 10, 100, 1003-1006, 1009, 101, 1010-1011, 1021-1024, 103-106, 1074-1075, 108-109, 11, 110, 115-119, 12, 120, 13, 1301-1302, 14-19, 193-199, 2, 20, 200-201, 208-209, 21, 210-211, 219, 22, 220-222, 225, 23-29, 3, 30-31, 316, 32-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60, 7, 728-729, 73, 730-731, 74-79, 8, 80-88, 887-889, 89, 890, 9, 90-94, 948-949, 95, 950-957, 96-99, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. Wide o’er man my realm extends, and proud the name that I, the goddess Cypris, bear, both in heaven’s courts and ’mongst all those who dwell within the limits of the sea i.e. the Euxine. and the bounds of Atlas, beholding the sun-god’s light;
6. Euripides, Ion, 672-675, 671 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 718 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

718. Have you already offered the goddess a sacrifice to usher in the maiden’s marriage? Agamemnon
8. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 104-158, 1581, 159-192, 318, 74-78, 97, 103 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

103. Stretch out your hand to me from the stairs now, stretch it out, the hand of age to youth
9. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

192d. only divining and darkly hinting what it wishes. Suppose that, as they lay together, Hephaestus should come and stand over them, and showing his implements should ask: What is it, good mortals, that you would have of one another? —and suppose that in their perplexity he asked them again: Do you desire to be joined in the closest possible union, so that you shall not be divided
10. Pollux, Onomasticon, 3.38 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

11. Epigraphy, Lsam, 20



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, and actors interpolations Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
agamemnon, seven against thebes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 595
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
anapaests Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 59
anthropomorphism, conflation/split of divine image with cosmic principle Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 59
aphrodite, dual anthropomorphic and cosmic nature of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 59
aphrodite, in the hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188, 200
aphrodite Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
aristotle, and the tragic chorus in the fourth century Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
artemis Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188, 200
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 110; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188
blasphemy Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188
carter, d.m. xix Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 110
causation, and character Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 33
celibacy Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188
characters, minor Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
characters, tragic/mythical, antigone Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
characters, tragic/mythical, ismene Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 110
chorogos/chorogia Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
chorostatas (kho-), chorou (ooooo) in manuscripts Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
chorostatas (kho-), embolima Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
cyrene, dance, in drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
dedication Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188
divine punishment/retribution Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188
eikos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 595
eleutheria Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 110
eros, confession of phaedra in hippolytus on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 59
eros, language and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 59
euripides, and actors interpolations Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
euripides, and old tragedy/reperformance Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
hagnos, as chastity and/or virginity Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 33
hagnos, purity Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 33
hagnos Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 33
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 595
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
isêgoria Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 110
kyriakou, p. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
language, eros and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 59
mega phronein Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188
noos/nous, seat of purity/impurity, in the hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 200
old tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
onomatopoeisis Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 59
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 595
parrhêsia Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 110
phaedra, hagnos Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 33
phaedra Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188, 200
phren/phrenes, seat of purity/impurity, in the hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188, 200
psyche as seat of purity/impurity, hippolytus parthenos psyche Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 200
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 595
segal, c. p. Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 59
sex, as source of pollution Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188
sexuality, and eating habits Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 33
sexuality, important in eur. hipp. Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 33
sophocles, and actors interpolations Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 237
sophocles, oedipus the king Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 595
sophronein/sophrosyne, hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188, 200
teichoskopia Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 915
theseus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 200
thesmophoria Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 33
virginity, and hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188, 200
virginity, and priests Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188
virginity, maintaining of before marriage' Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 188