Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5625
Euripides, Hippolytus, 1013-1015


ἀλλ' ὡς τυραννεῖν ἡδὺ τοῖσι σώφροσιν;all her sex? Did I aspire to fill the husband’s place after thee and succeed to thy house? The next few lines teem with so many difficulties, and present such evident traces of corruption that Weil rejects them bodily; Nauck, approving his verdict, endeavours however by new punctuation to exhort a meaning; while Mahaffy, following a system scarcely likely to win favour universally, entirely rearranges the passage. It is not improbable that here and elsewhere in this play, the two editions of it may have led to some confusion, due to the introduction by ignorant copyists of inappropriate lines from one edition to the other. That surely would have made me out a fool, a creature void of sense. Thou wilt say, Your chaste man loves to lord it. No, no! say I, sovereignty pleases only those


ἥκιστ', ἐπεί τοι τὰς φρένας διέφθορενall her sex? Did I aspire to fill the husband’s place after thee and succeed to thy house? The next few lines teem with so many difficulties, and present such evident traces of corruption that Weil rejects them bodily; Nauck, approving his verdict, endeavours however by new punctuation to exhort a meaning; while Mahaffy, following a system scarcely likely to win favour universally, entirely rearranges the passage. It is not improbable that here and elsewhere in this play, the two editions of it may have led to some confusion, due to the introduction by ignorant copyists of inappropriate lines from one edition to the other. That surely would have made me out a fool, a creature void of sense. Thou wilt say, Your chaste man loves to lord it. No, no! say I, sovereignty pleases only those


θνητῶν ὅσοισιν ἁνδάνει μοναρχία.]whose hearts are quite corrupt. Now, I would be the first and best at all the games in Hellas, but second in the state, for ever happy thus with the noblest for my friends. For there one may be happy, and the absence of danger


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 699, 604 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

604. δήμου κρατοῦσα χεὶρ ὅπῃ πληθύνεται. Δαναός
2. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 2.86-2.88 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Fragments, 1011-1020, 1010 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Hecuba, 1196-1207, 1195 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 207 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

207. Πιτθεὺς μέν ἐστι Πέλοπος, ἐκ δὲ Πιτθέως
6. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1001-1012, 1014-1064, 1068-1081, 1093, 77, 809, 917, 920-931, 943-959, 962-972, 974-975, 981-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. to mock at friends is not my way, father, but I am still the same behind their backs as to their face. The very crime thou thinkest to catch me in, is just the one I am untainted with, for to this day have I kept me pure from women. Nor know I aught thereof, save what I hear
7. Euripides, Ion, 596-606, 595 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

595. and if I win my way to the highest place in the state, and seek to be some one, I shall be hated by those who have no influence, for superiority is galling; while ’mongst men of worth who could show their wisdom, but are silent, and take no interest in politics
8. Euripides, Orestes, 908-913, 907 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 550-567, 549 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

549. Why do you honor to excess tyranny, a prosperous injustice
10. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 239-245, 414-416, 442-455, 238 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Sophocles, Ajax, 712 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Sophocles, Antigone, 160, 843, 940, 988, 159 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Sophocles, Electra, 548 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 583-602, 807-809, 548 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adynaton Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 173
aeschylus, dramas by\n, eumenides Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
aeschylus, dramas by\n, suppliant women Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
agon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
alcestis Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
antiphon, anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277, 287
antiphon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 173
aphrodite Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
choruses/choreuts, tragic Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
choruses/choreuts Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
creon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 173
creon (king of thebes) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
critias (tragic poet and politician) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 208
deception, and tragedy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277, 287
deception, association with rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277, 287
defence Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 173, 193
discourse Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
drama Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
epic Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
euripides, depiction of theseus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
euripides, forensic language in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277, 287
euripides, hippolytus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
euripides, on (im)materiality of lies Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 287
euripides, on lie-detection Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
euripides, on rhetoric of anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277, 287
euripides, on two voices Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
euripides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 173, 371
goeteia (wizardry) Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 287
hecuba Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
heraclidae Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
hippolytus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277, 287; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
lloyd, m. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193, 371
marriage Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
materiality, in euripides, of discourse Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 287
materiality, in euripides Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 287
minos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
mueller, m. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
murder Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 173, 193
mutilation, sexual Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 172
oedipus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 173
oligarchs/oligarchy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
orestes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
pasiphae Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
phaedra Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277
poetry Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
reception Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
reductio ad absurdum Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
revenge Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
rhetoric, of anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277, 287
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
solon (lawmaker and poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 208
sophistry, in euripides Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277, 287
sophocles, dramas by\n, antigone Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles, dramas by\n, trachiniae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 173, 371
sophocles (tragic poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sôphrosynê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
theseus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193; Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 277, 287
topoi, of inexperience Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 287
tragedy, abstinence Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 172
tragedy, choruses of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 173
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
tyrants/ tyranny Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
uranism Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 172
virginity, of tragic characters' Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 172