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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5625
Euripides, Hippolytus, 1001-1028


ἀλλ' αὑτὸς οὐ παροῦσι κἀγγὺς ὢν φίλοις.to mock at friends is not my way, father, but I am still the same behind their backs as to their face. The very crime thou thinkest to catch me in, is just the one I am untainted with, for to this day have I kept me pure from women. Nor know I aught thereof, save what I hear


ἑνὸς δ' ἄθικτος, ᾧ με νῦν ἔχειν δοκεῖς:to mock at friends is not my way, father, but I am still the same behind their backs as to their face. The very crime thou thinkest to catch me in, is just the one I am untainted with, for to this day have I kept me pure from women. Nor know I aught thereof, save what I hear


λέχους γὰρ ἐς τόδ' ἡμέρας ἁγνὸν δέμας:to mock at friends is not my way, father, but I am still the same behind their backs as to their face. The very crime thou thinkest to catch me in, is just the one I am untainted with, for to this day have I kept me pure from women. Nor know I aught thereof, save what I hear


οὐκ οἶδα πρᾶξιν τήνδε πλὴν λόγῳ κλύωνto mock at friends is not my way, father, but I am still the same behind their backs as to their face. The very crime thou thinkest to catch me in, is just the one I am untainted with, for to this day have I kept me pure from women. Nor know I aught thereof, save what I hear


γραφῇ τε λεύσσων: οὐδὲ ταῦτα γὰρ σκοπεῖνor see in pictures, for I have no wish to look even on these, so pure my virgin soul. I grant my claim to chastity may not convince thee; well, ’tis then for thee to show the way I was corrupted. Did this woman exceed in beauty


πρόθυμός εἰμι, παρθένον ψυχὴν ἔχων.or see in pictures, for I have no wish to look even on these, so pure my virgin soul. I grant my claim to chastity may not convince thee; well, ’tis then for thee to show the way I was corrupted. Did this woman exceed in beauty


καὶ δὴ τὸ σῶφρον τοὐμὸν οὐ πείθει ς': ἴτω:or see in pictures, for I have no wish to look even on these, so pure my virgin soul. I grant my claim to chastity may not convince thee; well, ’tis then for thee to show the way I was corrupted. Did this woman exceed in beauty


δεῖ δή σε δεῖξαι τῷ τρόπῳ διεφθάρην.or see in pictures, for I have no wish to look even on these, so pure my virgin soul. I grant my claim to chastity may not convince thee; well, ’tis then for thee to show the way I was corrupted. Did this woman exceed in beauty


πότερα τὸ τῆσδε σῶμ' ἐκαλλιστεύετοor see in pictures, for I have no wish to look even on these, so pure my virgin soul. I grant my claim to chastity may not convince thee; well, ’tis then for thee to show the way I was corrupted. Did this woman exceed in beauty


πασῶν γυναικῶν; ἢ σὸν οἰκήσειν δόμονall her sex? Did I aspire to fill the husband’s place after thee and succeed to thy house? The next few lines teem with so many difficulties, and present such evident traces of corruption that Weil rejects them bodily; Nauck, approving his verdict, endeavours however by new punctuation to exhort a meaning; while Mahaffy, following a system scarcely likely to win favour universally, entirely rearranges the passage. It is not improbable that here and elsewhere in this play, the two editions of it may have led to some confusion, due to the introduction by ignorant copyists of inappropriate lines from one edition to the other. That surely would have made me out a fool, a creature void of sense. Thou wilt say, Your chaste man loves to lord it. No, no! say I, sovereignty pleases only those


ἔγκληρον εὐνὴν προσλαβὼν ἐπήλπισα;all her sex? Did I aspire to fill the husband’s place after thee and succeed to thy house? The next few lines teem with so many difficulties, and present such evident traces of corruption that Weil rejects them bodily; Nauck, approving his verdict, endeavours however by new punctuation to exhort a meaning; while Mahaffy, following a system scarcely likely to win favour universally, entirely rearranges the passage. It is not improbable that here and elsewhere in this play, the two editions of it may have led to some confusion, due to the introduction by ignorant copyists of inappropriate lines from one edition to the other. That surely would have made me out a fool, a creature void of sense. Thou wilt say, Your chaste man loves to lord it. No, no! say I, sovereignty pleases only those


[μάταιος ἆρ' ἦν, οὐδαμοῦ μὲν οὖν φρενῶν.all her sex? Did I aspire to fill the husband’s place after thee and succeed to thy house? The next few lines teem with so many difficulties, and present such evident traces of corruption that Weil rejects them bodily; Nauck, approving his verdict, endeavours however by new punctuation to exhort a meaning; while Mahaffy, following a system scarcely likely to win favour universally, entirely rearranges the passage. It is not improbable that here and elsewhere in this play, the two editions of it may have led to some confusion, due to the introduction by ignorant copyists of inappropriate lines from one edition to the other. That surely would have made me out a fool, a creature void of sense. Thou wilt say, Your chaste man loves to lord it. No, no! say I, sovereignty pleases only those


ἀλλ' ὡς τυραννεῖν ἡδὺ τοῖσι σώφροσιν;all her sex? Did I aspire to fill the husband’s place after thee and succeed to thy house? The next few lines teem with so many difficulties, and present such evident traces of corruption that Weil rejects them bodily; Nauck, approving his verdict, endeavours however by new punctuation to exhort a meaning; while Mahaffy, following a system scarcely likely to win favour universally, entirely rearranges the passage. It is not improbable that here and elsewhere in this play, the two editions of it may have led to some confusion, due to the introduction by ignorant copyists of inappropriate lines from one edition to the other. That surely would have made me out a fool, a creature void of sense. Thou wilt say, Your chaste man loves to lord it. No, no! say I, sovereignty pleases only those


ἥκιστ', ἐπεί τοι τὰς φρένας διέφθορενall her sex? Did I aspire to fill the husband’s place after thee and succeed to thy house? The next few lines teem with so many difficulties, and present such evident traces of corruption that Weil rejects them bodily; Nauck, approving his verdict, endeavours however by new punctuation to exhort a meaning; while Mahaffy, following a system scarcely likely to win favour universally, entirely rearranges the passage. It is not improbable that here and elsewhere in this play, the two editions of it may have led to some confusion, due to the introduction by ignorant copyists of inappropriate lines from one edition to the other. That surely would have made me out a fool, a creature void of sense. Thou wilt say, Your chaste man loves to lord it. No, no! say I, sovereignty pleases only those


θνητῶν ὅσοισιν ἁνδάνει μοναρχία.]whose hearts are quite corrupt. Now, I would be the first and best at all the games in Hellas, but second in the state, for ever happy thus with the noblest for my friends. For there one may be happy, and the absence of danger


ἐγὼ δ' ἀγῶνας μὲν κρατεῖν ̔Ελληνικοὺςwhose hearts are quite corrupt. Now, I would be the first and best at all the games in Hellas, but second in the state, for ever happy thus with the noblest for my friends. For there one may be happy, and the absence of danger


πρῶτος θέλοιμ' ἄν, ἐν πόλει δὲ δεύτεροςwhose hearts are quite corrupt. Now, I would be the first and best at all the games in Hellas, but second in the state, for ever happy thus with the noblest for my friends. For there one may be happy, and the absence of danger


σὺν τοῖς ἀρίστοις εὐτυχεῖν ἀεὶ φίλοις:whose hearts are quite corrupt. Now, I would be the first and best at all the games in Hellas, but second in the state, for ever happy thus with the noblest for my friends. For there one may be happy, and the absence of danger


πράσσειν τε γὰρ πάρεστι, κίνδυνός τ' ἀπὼνwhose hearts are quite corrupt. Now, I would be the first and best at all the games in Hellas, but second in the state, for ever happy thus with the noblest for my friends. For there one may be happy, and the absence of danger


κρείσσω δίδωσι τῆς τυραννίδος χάριν.gives a charm beyond all princely joys.


ἓν οὐ λέλεκται τῶν ἐμῶν, τὰ δ' ἄλλ' ἔχεις:gives a charm beyond all princely joys.


εἰ μὲν γὰρ ἦν μοι μάρτυς οἷός εἰμ' ἐγὼgives a charm beyond all princely joys.


καὶ τῆσδ' ὁρώσης φέγγος ἠγωνιζόμηνgives a charm beyond all princely joys.


ἔργοις ἂν εἶδες τοὺς κακοὺς διεξιών:gives a charm beyond all princely joys.


νῦν δ' ὅρκιόν σοι Ζῆνα καὶ πέδον χθονὸςNow by Zeus, the god of oaths, and by the earth, whereon we stand, I swear to thee I never did lay hand upon thy wife nor would have wished to, or have harboured such a thought Slay me, ye gods! rob me of name and honour, from home and city cast me forth, a wandering exile o’er the earth!


ὄμνυμι τῶν σῶν μήποθ' ἅψασθαι γάμωνNow by Zeus, the god of oaths, and by the earth, whereon we stand, I swear to thee I never did lay hand upon thy wife nor would have wished to, or have harboured such a thought Slay me, ye gods! rob me of name and honour, from home and city cast me forth, a wandering exile o’er the earth!


μηδ' ἂν θελῆσαι μηδ' ἂν ἔννοιαν λαβεῖν.Now by Zeus, the god of oaths, and by the earth, whereon we stand, I swear to thee I never did lay hand upon thy wife nor would have wished to, or have harboured such a thought Slay me, ye gods! rob me of name and honour, from home and city cast me forth, a wandering exile o’er the earth!


ἦ τἄρ' ὀλοίμην ἀκλεὴς ἀνώνυμοςNow by Zeus, the god of oaths, and by the earth, whereon we stand, I swear to thee I never did lay hand upon thy wife nor would have wished to, or have harboured such a thought Slay me, ye gods! rob me of name and honour, from home and city cast me forth, a wandering exile o’er the earth!


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Euripides, Hecuba, 1196-1207, 1195 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 207 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

207. Πιτθεὺς μέν ἐστι Πέλοπος, ἐκ δὲ Πιτθέως
3. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1002-1064, 1068-1081, 1093, 51-56, 58-61, 616-619, 62, 620-626, 63-64, 643, 65, 653-658, 66, 660, 67-87, 887-890, 917, 920-931, 943-959, 962-972, 974-975, 981-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. to mock at friends is not my way, father, but I am still the same behind their backs as to their face. The very crime thou thinkest to catch me in, is just the one I am untainted with, for to this day have I kept me pure from women. Nor know I aught thereof, save what I hear
4. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adonijah Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 79
agon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127, 594
alcestis Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
aphrodite, in the hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
aphrodite Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
aristotle, rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 594
artemis Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
blasphemy Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
celibacy Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
children Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 79
critias (tragic poet and politician) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 208
dedication Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
defence Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 594
discourse Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
drama Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
eikos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 594
epic Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
euripides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
hecuba Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
heraclidae Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127, 594
hunt Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
hymn, to reverent purity Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
jocasta Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 79
justice, hippolytus as dikaios Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
lloyd, m. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193, 371
marriage Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
meadow, sacred, in the hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
minos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
mueller, m. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
murder Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
orestes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 594
pasiphae Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
phaedra Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
phren/phrenes, seat of purity/impurity, in the hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 594
poetry Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
pragmatics Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 594
prayer, hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
prokatalêpsis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 594
reception Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
reductio ad absurdum Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
revenge Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 594
socrates Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 594
solomon Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 79
solon (lawmaker and poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 208
sophocles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
sophronein/sophrosyne, hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
sôphrosynê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 127
theseus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 193
tisias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 594
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 371
water in ritual purification, in hippolytus meadow' Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 191
women Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 79