Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5624
Euripides, Hercules Furens, 923-941


nanVictims to purify the house were stationed before the altar of Zeus, for Heracles had slain and cast from his halls the king of the land.


nanVictims to purify the house were stationed before the altar of Zeus, for Heracles had slain and cast from his halls the king of the land.


nanThere stood his group of lovely children, with his father and Megara; and already the basket was being passed round the altar, and we were keeping holy silence. But just as Alcmena’s son was bringing the torch in his right hand to dip it in the holy water


nanThere stood his group of lovely children, with his father and Megara; and already the basket was being passed round the altar, and we were keeping holy silence. But just as Alcmena’s son was bringing the torch in his right hand to dip it in the holy water


nanThere stood his group of lovely children, with his father and Megara; and already the basket was being passed round the altar, and we were keeping holy silence. But just as Alcmena’s son was bringing the torch in his right hand to dip it in the holy water


nanThere stood his group of lovely children, with his father and Megara; and already the basket was being passed round the altar, and we were keeping holy silence. But just as Alcmena’s son was bringing the torch in his right hand to dip it in the holy water


nanThere stood his group of lovely children, with his father and Megara; and already the basket was being passed round the altar, and we were keeping holy silence. But just as Alcmena’s son was bringing the torch in his right hand to dip it in the holy water


nanhe stopped without a word. And as their father lingered, his children looked at him; he was no longer himself; his eyes were rolling; he was quite distraught; his eyeballs were bloodshot, and foam was oozing down his bearded cheek.


nanhe stopped without a word. And as their father lingered, his children looked at him; he was no longer himself; his eyes were rolling; he was quite distraught; his eyeballs were bloodshot, and foam was oozing down his bearded cheek.


nanhe stopped without a word. And as their father lingered, his children looked at him; he was no longer himself; his eyes were rolling; he was quite distraught; his eyeballs were bloodshot, and foam was oozing down his bearded cheek.


nanhe stopped without a word. And as their father lingered, his children looked at him; he was no longer himself; his eyes were rolling; he was quite distraught; his eyeballs were bloodshot, and foam was oozing down his bearded cheek.


nanhe stopped without a word. And as their father lingered, his children looked at him; he was no longer himself; his eyes were rolling; he was quite distraught; his eyeballs were bloodshot, and foam was oozing down his bearded cheek.


nanHe spoke with a madman’s laugh: Father, why should I offer the purifying flame before I have slain Eurystheus, and have the toil twice over? It is the work of my unaided arm to settle these things well; as soon as I have brought the head of Eurystheus here


nanHe spoke with a madman’s laugh: Father, why should I offer the purifying flame before I have slain Eurystheus, and have the toil twice over? It is the work of my unaided arm to settle these things well; as soon as I have brought the head of Eurystheus here


nanHe spoke with a madman’s laugh: Father, why should I offer the purifying flame before I have slain Eurystheus, and have the toil twice over? It is the work of my unaided arm to settle these things well; as soon as I have brought the head of Eurystheus here


nanHe spoke with a madman’s laugh: Father, why should I offer the purifying flame before I have slain Eurystheus, and have the toil twice over? It is the work of my unaided arm to settle these things well; as soon as I have brought the head of Eurystheus here


nanHe spoke with a madman’s laugh: Father, why should I offer the purifying flame before I have slain Eurystheus, and have the toil twice over? It is the work of my unaided arm to settle these things well; as soon as I have brought the head of Eurystheus here


nanI will cleanse my hands for those already slain. Spill the water, cast the baskets from your hands. Ho! give me now my bow and club! To Mycenae will I go; I must take crow-bars and pick-axes, for I will shatter again


nanI will cleanse my hands for those already slain. Spill the water, cast the baskets from your hands. Ho! give me now my bow and club! To Mycenae will I go; I must take crow-bars and pick-axes, for I will shatter again


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

42 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 756, 755 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

755. Your bride should go four years: in the fifth year
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.446-1.474 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.446. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.447. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.448. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.449. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.450. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.451. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.452. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.453. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.454. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.455. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.456. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.457. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.458. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.459. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Then, when they had prayed, and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads, and cut their throats, and flayed them, and cut out the thighs and covered them 1.460. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.461. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.462. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.463. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.464. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.465. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.466. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.467. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.468. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.469. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.470. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.471. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.472. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.473. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.474. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on
3. Homer, Odyssey, 3.420, 3.436-3.463, 11.119-11.134, 12.362, 14.414-14.445 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 7.42-7.43 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 246-249, 148 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

148. ὁ δ' ὤμοσε σπένδων βοηθήσειν ἔχων
6. Aristophanes, Birds, 1516-1524, 848-903, 958-991, 1515 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1515. ἐξ οὗπερ ὑμεῖς ᾠκίσατε τὸν ἀέρα.
7. Aristophanes, Clouds, 274 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

274. ὑπακούσατε δεξάμεναι θυσίαν καὶ τοῖς ἱεροῖσι χαρεῖσαι.
8. Aristophanes, Peace, 1009, 1013-1014, 1017-1021, 1023-1126, 1172-1178, 1186, 1229, 1253, 1264, 1275, 1290, 433, 960, 962-963, 973-987, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1005. καὶ Κωπᾴδων ἐλθεῖν σπυρίδας
9. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1137-1138, 677-678, 820, 1136 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1136. εἴ μοι πορίσας ἄρτον τιν' εὖ πεπεμμένον
10. Euripides, Andromache, 1101-1117, 1137-1142, 1100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1100. ἡμεῖς δὲ μῆλα, φυλλάδος Παρνασίας
11. Euripides, Bacchae, 33-36, 977-982, 32 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

32. τοιγάρ νιν αὐτὰς ἐκ δόμων ᾤστρησʼ ἐγὼ
12. Euripides, Electra, 167-185, 195-197, 511-515, 645, 713-726, 781-843, 91-92, 971-973, 166 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

166. δόλιον ἔσχεν ἀκοίταν.
13. Euripides, Hecuba, 456-474, 804, 455 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

455. ἢ νάσων, ἁλιήρει 455. Or to an island home, sent on a voyage of misery by oars that sweep the brine, leading a wretched existence in halls where the first-created palm and the bay-tree put forth their sacred
14. Euripides, Helen, 1560-1589, 1559 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1559. μὴ θιγγάνειν ἀπεῖργεν. ὁ δ' ̔Ελένης πόσις
15. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 404-410, 510-511, 513, 534, 554, 563, 567-573, 586-589, 403 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1001-1015, 1178-1213, 1269-1278, 151-164, 181, 20-21, 23-25, 361-363, 389, 394-402, 408-418, 422, 48, 520-522, 822-922, 924-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. with one shaft laid low his wife and child. Then in wild gallop he starts to slay his aged father; but there came a phantom, as it seemed to us on-lookers, of Pallas, with plumed helm, brandishing a spear; and she hurled a rock against the breast of Heracles
17. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 381-384, 386-388, 380 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Euripides, Orestes, 114, 1140-1142, 1137 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1007-1012, 1015-1018, 898, 952, 997, 1006 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1006. No, by Zeus and all his stars, by Ares, god of blood, who established the Sown-men that sprung one day from earth as lords of this land! I will go, and standing on the topmost battlements
20. Herodotus, Histories, 2.40, 4.33, 4.78 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.40. But in regard to the disembowelling and burning of the victims, there is a different way for each sacrifice. I shall now, however, speak of that goddess whom they consider the greatest, and in whose honor they keep highest festival. ,After praying in the foregoing way, they take the whole stomach out of the flayed bull, leaving the entrails and the fat in the carcass, and cut off the legs, the end of the loin, the shoulders, and the neck. ,Having done this, they fill what remains of the carcass with pure bread, honey, raisins, figs, frankincense, myrrh, and other kinds of incense, and then burn it, pouring a lot of oil on it. ,They fast before the sacrifice, and while it is burning, they all make lamentation; and when their lamentation is over, they set out a meal of what is left of the victim. 4.33. But the Delians say much more about them than any others do. They say that offerings wrapped in straw are brought from the Hyperboreans to Scythia; when these have passed Scythia, each nation in turn receives them from its neighbors until they are carried to the Adriatic sea, which is the most westerly limit of their journey; ,from there, they are brought on to the south, the people of Dodona being the first Greeks to receive them. From Dodona they come down to the Melian gulf, and are carried across to Euboea, and one city sends them on to another until they come to Carystus; after this, Andros is left out of their journey, for Carystians carry them to Tenos, and Tenians to Delos. ,Thus (they say) these offerings come to Delos. But on the first journey, the Hyperboreans sent two maidens bearing the offerings, to whom the Delians give the names Hyperoche and Laodice, and five men of their people with them as escort for safe conduct, those who are now called Perpherees and greatly honored at Delos. ,But when those whom they sent never returned, they took it amiss that they should be condemned always to be sending people and not getting them back, and so they carry the offerings, wrapped in straw, to their borders, and tell their neighbors to send them on from their own country to the next; ,and the offerings, it is said, come by this conveyance to Delos. I can say of my own knowledge that there is a custom like these offerings; namely, that when the Thracian and Paeonian women sacrifice to the Royal Artemis, they have straw with them while they sacrifice. 4.78. This, then, was how Anacharsis fared, owing to his foreign ways and consorting with Greeks; and a great many years afterward, Scyles, son of Ariapithes, suffered a like fate. Scyles was one of the sons born to Ariapithes, king of Scythia; but his mother was of Istria, and not native-born; and she taught him to speak and read Greek. ,As time passed, Ariapithes was treacherously killed by Spargapithes, king of the Agathyrsi, and Scyles inherited the kingship and his father's wife, a Scythian woman whose name was Opoea, and she bore Scyles a son, Oricus. ,So Scyles was king of Scythia; but he was in no way content with the Scythian way of life, and was much more inclined to Greek ways, from the upbringing that he had received. So this is what he would do: he would lead the Scythian army to the city of the Borysthenites (who say that they are Milesians), and when he arrived there would leave his army in the suburb of the city, ,while he himself, entering within the walls and shutting the gates, would take off his Scythian apparel and put on Greek dress; and in it he would go among the townsfolk unattended by spearmen or any others (who would guard the gates, lest any Scythian see him wearing this apparel), and in every way follow the Greek manner of life, and worship the gods according to Greek usage. ,When he had spent a month or more like this, he would put on Scythian dress and leave the city. He did this often; and he built a house in Borysthenes, and married a wife of the people of the country and brought her there.
21. Isaeus, Orations, 8.15-8.16 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22. Lysias, Against Andocides, 450 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

23. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

344a. the man who has the ability to overreach on a large scale. Consider this type of man, then, if you wish to judge how much more profitable it is to him personally to be unjust than to be just. And the easiest way of all to understand this matter will be to turn to the most consummate form of injustice which makes the man who has done the wrong most happy and those who are wronged and who would not themselves willingly do wrong most miserable. And this is tyranny, which both by stealth and by force takes away what belongs to others, both sacred and profane, both private and public, not little by little but at one swoop.
24. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

190c. Ephialtes and Otus, that scheming to assault the gods in fight they essayed to mount high heaven.
25. Sophocles, Antigone, 1006-1011, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

26. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 1.2.10, 7.8.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.8.3. And Xenophon said, Well, really, with weather of the sort you describe and provisions used up and no chance even to get a smell of wine, when many of us were becoming exhausted with hardships and the enemy were at our heels, if at such a time as that I wantonly abused you, I admit that I am more wanton even than the ass, which, because of its wantonness, so the saying runs, is not subject to fatigue. Nevertheless, do tell us, he said, for what reason you were struck. 7.8.3. But when the Lampsacenes sent gifts of hospitality to Xenophon and he was sacrificing to Apollo, he gave Eucleides a place beside him; and when Eucleides saw the vitals of the victims, he said that he well believed that Xenophon had no money. But I am sure, he went on, that even if money should ever be about to come to you, some obstacle always appears—if nothing else, your own self. In this Xenophon agreed with him.
27. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.4.12, 1.4.18, 1.7, 1.7.22, 3.3.3-3.3.4, 3.4.23, 4.3.13, 5.4.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.4.12. And when he found that the temper of the Athenians was kindly, that they had chosen him general, and that his friends were urging him by personal messages to return, he sailed in to Piraeus, arriving on the day when the city was celebrating the Plynteria When the clothing of the ancient wooden statue of Athena Polias was removed and washed ( πλύνειν ). and the statue of Athena was veiled from sight,—a circumstance which some people imagined was of ill omen, both for him and for the state; for on that day no Athenian would venture to engage in any serious business. 1.4.18. Meanwhile Alcibiades, who had come to anchor close to the shore, did not at once disembark, through fear of his enemies; but mounting upon the deck of 407 B.C. his ship, he looked to see whether his friends were present. 1.7.22. Or if you do not wish to do this, try them under the following law, which applies to temple-robbers and traitors: namely, if anyone shall be a traitor to the state or shall steal sacred property, he shall be tried before a court, and if he be convicted, he shall not be buried in Attica, and his property shall be confiscated. 3.3.3. But Diopeithes, a man very well versed in oracles, said in support of Leotychides that there was also an oracle of Apollo which bade the Lacedaemonians beware of the lame kingship. Agesilaus was lame. Lysander, however, made reply to him, on behalf of Agesilaus, that he did not suppose the god was bidding them beware lest a king of theirs should get a sprain and become lame, but rather lest one who was not of the royal stock should become king. For the kingship would be lame in very truth when it was not the descendants of Heracles who were at the head of the state. 3.3.4. After hearing such arguments from both claimants the state chose Agesilaus king. When Agesilaus had been not yet a year in the kingly office, once while he was offering one of the appointed sacrifices in behalf of the state, the seer said that the gods revealed a conspiracy of the most 397 B.C. terrible sort. And when he sacrificed again, the seer said that the signs appeared still more terrible. And upon his sacrificing for the third time, he said: Agesilaus, just such a sign is given me as would be given if we were in the very midst of the enemy. There-upon they made offerings to the gods who avert evil and to those who grant safety, and having with difficulty obtained favourable omens, ceased sacrificing. And within five days after the sacrifice was ended a man reported to the ephors a conspiracy, and Cinadon as the head of the affair. 3.4.23. Then Agesilaus, aware that the infantry of the enemy was not yet at hand, while on his side none of the arms which had been made ready was missing, deemed it a fit time to join battle if he could. Therefore, after offering sacrifice, he at once led his phalanx against the opposing line of horsemen, ordering the first ten year-classes Cp. II. iv. 32 and the note thereon. of the hoplites to run to close quarters with the enemy, and bidding the peltasts lead the way at a double-quick. He also sent word to his cavalry to attack, in the assurance that he and the whole army were following them. 4.3.13. Now Agesilaus, on learning these things, at first was overcome with sorrow; but when he had considered that the most of his troops were the sort of men to share gladly in good fortune if good fortune came, but that if they saw anything unpleasant, they were under no compulsion to share in it, I.e., being practically volunteers (cp. ii. 4). —thereupon, changing the report, he said that word had come that Peisander was dead, but victorious in the naval battle. 5.4.4. As for Phillidas, since the polemarchs always celebrate a festival of Aphrodite upon the expiration of their term of office, he was making all the arrangements for them, and in particular, having long ago promised to bring them women, and the most stately and beautiful women there were in Thebes, he said he would do so at that time. And they — for they were that sort of men — expected to spend the night very pleasantly.
28. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 7.2.19-7.2.20 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.2.20. Knowing thyself, O Croesus—thus shalt thou live and be happy. There is a reference to the famous inscription on the temple at Delphi — γνῶθι σεαυτόν.
29. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.2.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.2.13. And yet, when you are resolved to cultivate these, you don’t think courtesy is due to your mother, who loves you more than all? Don’t you know that even the state ignores all other forms of ingratitude and pronounces no judgment on them, Cyropaedia I. ii. 7. caring nothing if the recipient of a favour neglects to thank his benefactor, but inflicts penalties on the man who is discourteous to his parents and rejects him as unworthy of office, holding that it would be a sin for him to offer sacrifices on behalf of the state and that he is unlikely to do anything else honourably and rightly? Aye, and if one fail to honour his parents’ graves, the state inquires into that too, when it examines the candidates for office.
30. Menander, Dyscolus, 494 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

31. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.690-4.717 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.690. ἄμφω δʼ ἑσπέσθην αὐτὴν ὁδόν, ἔστʼ ἀφίκοντο 4.691. Κίρκης ἐς μέγαρον· τοὺς δʼ ἐν λιπαροῖσι κέλευεν 4.692. ἥγε θρόνοις ἕζεσθαι, ἀμηχανέουσα κιόντων. 4.693. τὼ δʼ ἄνεῳ καὶ ἄναυδοι ἐφʼ ἑστίῃ ἀίξαντε 4.694. ἵζανον, ἥ τε δίκη λυγροῖς ἱκέτῃσι τέτυκται 4.695. ἡ μὲν ἐπʼ ἀμφοτέραις θεμένη χείρεσσι μέτωπα 4.696. αὐτὰρ ὁ κωπῆεν μέγα φάσγανον ἐν χθονὶ πήξας 4.697. ᾧπέρ τʼ Αἰήταο πάιν κτάνεν· οὐδέ ποτʼ ὄσσε 4.698. ἰθὺς ἐνὶ βλεφάροισιν ἀνέσχεθον. αὐτίκα δʼ ἔγνω 4.699. Κίρκη φύξιον οἶτον ἀλιτροσύνας τε φόνοιο. 4.700. τῶ καὶ ὀπιζομένη Ζηνὸς θέμιν Ἱκεσίοιο 4.701. ὃς μέγα μὲν κοτέει, μέγα δʼ ἀνδροφόνοισιν ἀρήγει 4.702. ῥέζε θυηπολίην, οἵῃ τʼ ἀπολυμαίνονται 4.703. νηλειεῖς ἱκέται, ὅτʼ ἐφέστιοι ἀντιόωσιν. 4.704. πρῶτα μὲν ἀτρέπτοιο λυτήριον ἥγε φόνοιο 4.705. τειναμένη καθύπερθε συὸς τέκος, ἧς ἔτι μαζοὶ 4.706. πλήμμυρον λοχίης ἐκ νηδύος, αἵματι χεῖρας 4.707. τέγγεν, ἐπιτμήγουσα δέρην· αὖτις δὲ καὶ ἄλλοις 4.708. μείλισσεν χύτλοισι, καθάρσιον ἀγκαλέουσα 4.709. Ζῆνα, παλαμναίων τιμήορον ἱκεσιάων. 4.710. καὶ τὰ μὲν ἀθρόα πάντα δόμων ἐκ λύματʼ ἔνεικαν 4.711. νηιάδες πρόπολοι, ταί οἱ πόρσυνον ἕκαστα. 4.712. ἡ δʼ εἴσω πελάνους μείλικτρά τε νηφαλίῃσιν 4.713. καῖεν ἐπʼ εὐχωλῇσι παρέστιος, ὄφρα χόλοιο 4.714. σμερδαλέας παύσειεν Ἐρινύας, ἠδὲ καὶ αὐτὸς 4.715. εὐμειδής τε πέλοιτο καὶ ἤπιος ἀμφοτέροισιν 4.716. εἴτʼ οὖν ὀθνείῳ μεμιασμένοι αἵματι χεῖρας 4.717. εἴτε καὶ ἐμφύλῳ προσκηδέες ἀντιόωσιν.
32. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.11, 10.3.20 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3.11. In Crete, not only these rites, but in particular those sacred to Zeus, were performed along with orgiastic worship and with the kind of ministers who were in the service of Dionysus, I mean the Satyri. These ministers they called Curetes, young men who executed movements in armour, accompanied by dancing, as they set forth the mythical story of the birth of Zeus; in this they introduced Cronus as accustomed to swallow his children immediately after their birth, and Rhea as trying to keep her travail secret and, when the child was born, to get it out of the way and save its life by every means in her power; and to accomplish this it is said that she took as helpers the Curetes, who, by surrounding the goddess with tambourines and similar noisy instruments and with war-dance and uproar, were supposed to strike terror into Cronus and without his knowledge to steal his child away; and that, according to tradition, Zeus was actually reared by them with the same diligence; consequently the Curetes, either because, being young, that is youths, they performed this service, or because they reared Zeus in his youth (for both explanations are given), were accorded this appellation, as if they were Satyrs, so to speak, in the service of Zeus. Such, then, were the Greeks in the matter of orgiastic worship. 10.3.20. But though the Scepsian, who compiled these myths, does not accept the last statement, on the ground that no mystic story of the Cabeiri is told in Samothrace, still he cites also the opinion of Stesimbrotus the Thasian that the sacred rites in Samothrace were performed in honor of the Cabeiri: and the Scepsian says that they were called Cabeiri after the mountain Cabeirus in Berecyntia. Some, however, believe that the Curetes were the same as the Corybantes and were ministers of Hecate. But the Scepsian again states, in opposition to the words of Euripides, that the rites of Rhea were not sanctioned or in vogue in Crete, but only in Phrygia and the Troad, and that those who say otherwise are dealing in myths rather than in history, though perhaps the identity of the place-names contributed to their making this mistake. For instance, Ida is not only a Trojan, but also a Cretan, mountain; and Dicte is a place in Scepsia and also a mountain in Crete; and Pytna, after which the city Hierapytna was named, is a peak of Ida. And there is a Hippocorona in the territory of Adramyttium and a Hippocoronium in Crete. And Samonium is the eastern promontory of the island and a plain in the territory of Neandria and in that of the Alexandreians.
33. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 14.242 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14.242. wherein they desire that the Jews may be allowed to observe their Sabbaths, and other sacred rites, according to the laws of their forefathers, and that they may be under no command, because they are our friends and confederates, and that nobody may injure them in our provinces. Now although the Trallians there present contradicted them, and were not pleased with these decrees, yet didst thou give order that they should be observed, and informedst us that thou hadst been desired to write this to us about them.
34. Longinus, On The Sublime, 15.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

35. Plutarch, On The Obsolescence of Oracles, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

36. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 8.33 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8.33. Right has the force of an oath, and that is why Zeus is called the God of Oaths. Virtue is harmony, and so are health and all good and God himself; this is why they say that all things are constructed according to the laws of harmony. The love of friends is just concord and equality. We should not pay equal worship to gods and heroes, but to the gods always, with reverent silence, in white robes, and after purification, to the heroes only from midday onwards. Purification is by cleansing, baptism and lustration, and by keeping clean from all deaths and births and all pollution, and abstaining from meat and flesh of animals that have died, mullets, gurnards, eggs and egg-sprung animals, beans, and the other abstinences prescribed by those who perform rites in the sanctuaries.
37. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.18.22 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

38. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.18.22 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

39. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 8.11 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

40. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 44

41. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 6.5-6.10, 7.9, 20.2-20.3

42. Papyri, Bgu, 1211



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles tatius Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
actaeon Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
aegisthus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
aeschylus, aeschylean (dionysiac) tetralogies/plays Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
agonothetai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
alcestis Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
amplificatio Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 615
apollo Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 831
archons, eponymous Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
aristophanes Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
artemis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 831
athena Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
athena soteira nike, and zeus soter Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
athena soteira nike, on mt boreius Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
atreus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
blood, as purificatory agent Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 122
cakes (offerings) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 831
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
death of dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 615, 831
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
derveni papyrus, first columns Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
derveni poem Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
ekkyklêma Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 831
erinyes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
eumenides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
euripides, heracles Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
euripides Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78, 171
eusebeia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
expiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
hades, terrors of hades Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
heliodorus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
henrichs, a. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216, 831; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
heracles, purification of Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 122
heracles Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 181, 182; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216, 615
herms Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
herodotus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
hipparchs Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
iris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
italian peninsula Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 181, 182, 183
khernips Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 122
knowledge, acquired in the initiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
koina Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
kommos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
libations Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 122
lloyd, m. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 615
longus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
lyssa/fury Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 181, 182, 183
lyssa Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
mystery cults, in the cities Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
neoptolemus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
nicias Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
offerings (bloodless) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
oikos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
on stage Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
orestes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 831
personification Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
poseidon, alongside a saviour god Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
priests and priestesses, of asclepius, in city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
priests and priestesses, of thesmophoroi at melite Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
priests and priestesses Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
profane Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
prytaneis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
punishments Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
realism Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 615
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 831
resemblances, bassarae/bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
resemblances, lycurgeia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
resemblances, theban tetralogy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
resemblances, toxotides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
resemblances, xantriae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 831
sacrifice, beauty of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
sacrifice Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 831; Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
sacrifices' "328.0_135.0@titan's crime" Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
semele Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
sicily Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
sophocles, ajax Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
thesmophoroi of melite Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
thrace Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 181
thucydides Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
titans Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
torches' Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 122
underworld Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
uranus phallus, in ritual Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
vase-paintings Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 69
xenophon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 171
xuthus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
zeus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 615
zeus soter, in rhamnus Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
zeus soter, in the piraeus Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
zeus soter, in thebes Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
λεγόμενα Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
μάγοι Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135
ἱερά Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 135