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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5624
Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1314-1319


nanI cannot counsel you . . . rather than to go on suffering. There is not a man alive that has wholly escaped misfortune’s taint


nannor any god either, if what poets sing is true. Have they not intermarried in ways that law forbids? Have they not thrown fathers into ignominious chains to gain the sovereign power? Still they inhabit Olympus and brave the issue of their crimes.


nannor any god either, if what poets sing is true. Have they not intermarried in ways that law forbids? Have they not thrown fathers into ignominious chains to gain the sovereign power? Still they inhabit Olympus and brave the issue of their crimes.


nannor any god either, if what poets sing is true. Have they not intermarried in ways that law forbids? Have they not thrown fathers into ignominious chains to gain the sovereign power? Still they inhabit Olympus and brave the issue of their crimes.


nannor any god either, if what poets sing is true. Have they not intermarried in ways that law forbids? Have they not thrown fathers into ignominious chains to gain the sovereign power? Still they inhabit Olympus and brave the issue of their crimes.


nannor any god either, if what poets sing is true. Have they not intermarried in ways that law forbids? Have they not thrown fathers into ignominious chains to gain the sovereign power? Still they inhabit Olympus and brave the issue of their crimes.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 24.28-24.30 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

24.28. /And the thing was pleasing unto all the rest, yet not unto Hera or Poseidon or the flashing-eyed maiden, but they continued even as when at the first sacred Ilios became hateful in their eyes and Priam and his folk, by reason of the sin of Alexander, for that he put reproach upon those goddesses when they came to his steading 24.29. /And the thing was pleasing unto all the rest, yet not unto Hera or Poseidon or the flashing-eyed maiden, but they continued even as when at the first sacred Ilios became hateful in their eyes and Priam and his folk, by reason of the sin of Alexander, for that he put reproach upon those goddesses when they came to his steading 24.30. /and gave precedence to her who furthered his fatal lustfulness. But when at length the twelfth morn thereafter was come, then among the immortals spake Phoebus Apollo:Cruel are ye, O ye gods, and workers of bane. Hath Hector then never burned for you thighs of bulls and goats without blemish?
2. Euripides, Archelaus (Fragmenta Papyracea), 360.8, 360.13 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 1031-1036, 191-196, 215-219, 236-252, 270-271, 1030 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1030. Bury my body after death in its destined grave in front of the shrine of the virgin goddess Pallas. at Pallene. And I will be thy friend and guardian of thy city for ever, where I lie buried in a foreign soil, but a bitter foe to these children’s descendants
4. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1003-1006, 1163-1313, 1315-1428, 217-229, 266-267, 339-347, 480-482, 613, 765-766, 815, 884, 906, 1002 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1179, 1187, 1195-1199, 1204, 1206-1208, 1216, 1219, 1329-1334, 1420-1422, 453-456, 1173 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Trojan Women, 19-20, 884-889, 914-965, 983-986, 18 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Furens, 651, 666, 668-672, 761, 650 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amphitryon/amphitruo Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
amplificatio Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 224
anaxagoras Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 535
antiphon the sophist Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 530
aphrodite, eros deriving from Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 38
aphrodite Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 535
athena Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 224
athens, imperialism (athenian) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 869, 876, 877
athens Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 224
cerberus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 206
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 869, 876
diogenes of apollonia Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 535
ecphrasis Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
epic Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
eros, aphrodite as origin of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 38
eros, debate between hecuba and helen in troades on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 38
gorgias, encomium of helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 535
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 535
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 535
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 206, 530
heracles Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 206, 224, 530, 869, 876, 877
hercules Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
hero Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
hippolytus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
horror Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
intertextuality Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 530, 535
iris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 206
messenger Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
mills, s. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 869, 876, 877
monologue Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
narrator Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
peirithous Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 869, 877
perspective Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
phaedra Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
pucci, p. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 530, 535
sophia, wisdom in debate between helen and hecuba in troades' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 38
sophia Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 535
space Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
speech Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 876
theseus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
topos/oi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 869
transitions Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
troades debate between hecuba and helen Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 38
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 535
underworld Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
xenophanes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 530
zeus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 224, 530, 535