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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5624
Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1178-1213


nanO king, whose home is that olive-clad hill! Theseu


nanWhy this piteous prelude in addressing me? Amphitryon


nanThe gods have afflicted us with grievous suffering. Theseu


nanWhose are these children, over whom you weep? Amphitryon


nanMy own son’s children, woe is him! he was their father and butcher both, hardening his heart to the bloody deed. Theseu


nanMy own son’s children, woe is him! he was their father and butcher both, hardening his heart to the bloody deed. Theseu


nanHush! good words only! Amphitryon


nanI would I could obey! Theseu


nanWhat dreadful words! Amphitryon


nanFortune has spread her wings, and we are ruined, ruined. Theseu


nanWhat do you mean? what has he done? Amphitryon


nanSlain them in a wild fit of frenzy


nanwith arrows dipped in the venom of the hundred-headed hydra. Theseu


nanThis is Hera’s work; but who lies there among the dead, old man? Amphitryon


nanMy son, my own enduring son, that marched with gods to Phlegra’s plain, there to battle with giants and slay them, warrior that he was. Theseu


nanMy son, my own enduring son, that marched with gods to Phlegra’s plain, there to battle with giants and slay them, warrior that he was. Theseu


nanMy son, my own enduring son, that marched with gods to Phlegra’s plain, there to battle with giants and slay them, warrior that he was. Theseu


nanAh, ah! whose fortune was ever so cursed as his? Amphitryon


nanNever will you find another mortal that has suffered more or been driven harder. Theseu


nanNever will you find another mortal that has suffered more or been driven harder. Theseu


nanWhy does he veil his head, poor wretch, in his robe? Amphitryon


nanHe is ashamed to meet your eye;


nanhis kinsman’s kind intent and his children’s blood make him abashed. Theseu


nanhis kinsman’s kind intent and his children’s blood make him abashed. Theseu


nanBut I come to sympathize; uncover him. Amphitryon


nanBut I come to sympathize; uncover him. Amphitryon


nanMy son, remove that mantle


nanfrom your eyes, throw it from you, show your face to the sun. As a counterweight, fighting along with my tears, I entreat you as a suppliant, as I grasp your beard, your knees, your hands, and let fall


nanfrom your eyes, throw it from you, show your face to the sun. As a counterweight, fighting along with my tears, I entreat you as a suppliant, as I grasp your beard, your knees, your hands, and let fall


nanfrom your eyes, throw it from you, show your face to the sun. As a counterweight, fighting along with my tears, I entreat you as a suppliant, as I grasp your beard, your knees, your hands, and let fall


nanfrom your eyes, throw it from you, show your face to the sun. As a counterweight, fighting along with my tears, I entreat you as a suppliant, as I grasp your beard, your knees, your hands, and let fall


nanfrom your eyes, throw it from you, show your face to the sun. As a counterweight, fighting along with my tears, I entreat you as a suppliant, as I grasp your beard, your knees, your hands, and let fall


nanthe tear from my old eyes. O my child! restrain your savage lion-like temper, for you are rushing forth on an unholy course of bloodshed, eager to join mischief to mischief, child. Theseu


nanthe tear from my old eyes. O my child! restrain your savage lion-like temper, for you are rushing forth on an unholy course of bloodshed, eager to join mischief to mischief, child. Theseu


nanthe tear from my old eyes. O my child! restrain your savage lion-like temper, for you are rushing forth on an unholy course of bloodshed, eager to join mischief to mischief, child. Theseu


nanthe tear from my old eyes. O my child! restrain your savage lion-like temper, for you are rushing forth on an unholy course of bloodshed, eager to join mischief to mischief, child. Theseu


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Euripides, Hecuba, 456-474, 455 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

455. ἢ νάσων, ἁλιήρει 455. Or to an island home, sent on a voyage of misery by oars that sweep the brine, leading a wretched existence in halls where the first-created palm and the bay-tree put forth their sacred
2. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 192-196, 215-219, 236-252, 270-271, 191 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

191. οὔκουν ̓Αθήνας γ': οὐ γὰρ ̓Αργείων φόβῳ
3. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1001-1015, 1163-1177, 1179-1428, 225-226, 228, 831-832, 835-841, 861-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. with one shaft laid low his wife and child. Then in wild gallop he starts to slay his aged father; but there came a phantom, as it seemed to us on-lookers, of Pallas, with plumed helm, brandishing a spear; and she hurled a rock against the breast of Heracles
4. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1179, 1187, 1195-1199, 1204, 1206-1208, 1216, 1219, 1173 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Furens, 651, 666, 668-672, 761, 650 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amphitryon/amphitruo Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
amplificatio Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216, 225
athena Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
athens, imperialism (athenian) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 869
athens Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 225
cerberus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 206
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 869
ecphrasis Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
ekkyklêma Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
epic Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 206, 216
heracles Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 206, 216, 225, 869
hercules Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
hero Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
hippolytus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
horror Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
iris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 206, 216
kommos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
messenger Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
miasma Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 225
mills, s. xxiv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 869
monologue Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
narrator Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
oikos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
peirithous Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 869
peripeteia/ae Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 225
perspective Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
phaedra Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
philia Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 225
sophocles, ajax Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 216
space Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
speech Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
theseus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
topos/oi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 869
transitions' Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180
underworld Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 180