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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5622
Euripides, Helen, 1542-1604
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ὦ τλήμονες, πῶς ἐκ τίνος νεώς ποτεYe hapless mariners, how have ye come hither? your Achaean ship where wrecked? Are ye here to help bury dead Atreus' son, whose missing body this lady, daughter of Tyndareas, is honouring with a cenotaph? Then they with feigned tears proceeded to the ship, bearing aboard the offerings to be thrown into the deep for Menelaus. Thereat were we suspicious, and communed amongst ourselves regarding the number of extra voyagers; but still we kept silence out of respect for thy orders, for by intrusting the command of the vessel to the stranger thou didst thus spoil all. Now the other victims gave no trouble, and we easily put them aboard; only the bull refused to go forward along the gangway, but rolled his eyes around and kept bellowing, and, arching his back and glaring askance towards his horns
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μὴ θιγγάνειν ἀπεῖργεν. ὁ δ' ̔Ελένης πόσιςhe would not let us touch him. But Helen's lord cried out: "O! ye who laid waste the town of Ilium, come pick up yon bull, the dead man's offering, on your stout shoulders, as is the way in Hellas, and cast him into the hold;" and as he spoke he drew his sword in readiness. Then they at his command came and caught up the bull and carried him bodily on to the deck. And Menelaus stroked the horse on neck and brow, coaxing it to go aboard. At length, when the ship was fully freighted, Helen climbed the ladder with graceful step and took her seat midway betwixt the rowers' benches, and he sat by her side, even Menelaus who was called dead; and the rest, equally divided on the right and left side of the ship, sat them down, each beside his man, with swords concealed beneath their cloaks, and the billows soon were echoing to the rowers' song, as we heard the boatswain's note. Now when we were put out a space, not very far nor very near, the helmsman asked, "Shall we, sir stranger, sail yet further on our course, or will this serve? For thine it is to command the ship." And he answered: "'Tis far enough for me," while in his right hand he gripped his sword and stepped on to the prow; then standing o'er the bull to slay it, never a word said he of any dead man, but cut its throat and thus made prayer:
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τέμνων δὲ λαιμὸν ηὔχετ': ὦ ναίων ἅλαPoseidon, lord of the sea, whose home is in the deep, and ye holy daughters of Nereus, bring me and my wife safe and sound to Nauplia's strand from hence! Anon a gush of blood, fair omen for the stranger, spouted into the tide. One cried, There is treachery in this voyage; why should we now sail to Nauplia? Give the order, helmsman, turn thy rudder." But the son of Atreus, standing where he slew the bull, called to his comrades, "Why do ye, the pick of Hellas, delay to smite and slay the barbarians and fling them from the ship into the waves?" While to thy crew the boatswain cried the opposite command: "Ho! some of you catch up chance spars, break up the benches, or snatch the oar-blade from the thole, and beat out the brains of these our foreign foes." Forthwith up sprang each man, the one part armed with poles that sailors use, the other with swords.
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φόνῳ δὲ ναῦς ἐρρεῖτο. παρακέλευσμα δ' ἦνAnd the ship ran down with blood; while Helen from her seat upon the stern thus cheered them on: "Where is the fame ye won in Troy? show it against these barbarians." Then as they hasted to the fray, some would fall and some rise up again, while others hadst thou seen laid low in death. But Menelaus in full armour, made his way, sword in hand, to any point where his watchful eye perceived his comrades in distress; so we leapt from the ship and swam, and he cleared the benches of thy rowers. Then did the prince set himself to steer, and bade them make a straight course to Hellas. So they set up the mast, and favouring breezes blew; and they are clear away, while I, from death escaped, let myself down by the anchor chain into the sea; and, just as I was spent, one threw me a rope and rescued me, and drew me to land to bring to thee this message. Ah! there is naught more serviceable to mankind than a prudent distrust.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Euripides, Alcestis, 426-429, 611-612, 614-635, 743-744, 862-863, 866-867, 869-871, 897-902, 911, 916-919, 922, 926-928, 425 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

425. Ho! sirrahs, catch me this woman; hold her fast; for ’tis no welcome story she will have to hear. It was to make thee leave the holy altar of the goddess that I held thy child’s death before thy eyes, and so induced thee to give thyself up to me to die.
2. Euripides, Andromache, 1117-1172, 1176, 1187, 1211, 1218, 1226-1242, 1263-1270, 1116 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1116. εἷς ἦν ἁπάντων τῶνδε μηχανορράφος.
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 1217-1226, 1285, 1300-1329, 1216 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1216. ἕπεσθέ μοι φέροντες ἄθλιον βάρος 1216. Follow me, carrying the miserable burden of Pentheus, follow me, slaves, before the house; exhausted from countless searches, I am bringing his body, for I discovered it in the folds of Kithairon
4. Euripides, Electra, 1277-1280, 1276 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1276. σοὶ μὲν τάδ' εἶπον: τόνδε δ' Αἰγίσθου νέκυν
5. Euripides, Hecuba, 1288, 25-50, 610, 616, 675, 678-680, 684-732, 894-897, 1287 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1287. ̔Εκάβη, σὺ δ', ὦ τάλαινα, διπτύχους νεκροὺς
6. Euripides, Helen, 1240, 1243, 1260, 1291-1300, 1390-1395, 1400, 1408, 1419, 1528, 1543-1604, 164-166, 580-581, 947-948, 118 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

118. ὥσπερ γε σέ, οὐδὲν ἧσσον, ὀφθαλμοῖς ὁρῶ. 118. I saw her with my own eyes, just as I see you, no less. Helen
7. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 1027-1045, 1159-1162, 1026 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1026. rend= Bury my body after death in its destined grave in front of the shrine of the virgin goddess Pallas. at Pallene. And I will be thy friend and guardian of thy city for ever, where I lie buried in a foreign soil, but a bitter foe to these children’s descendants, whensoe’er Referring to invasions by the Peloponnesians, descendants of the Heracleidae. with gathered host they come against this land, traitors to your kindness now; such are the strangers ye have championed. Why then came I hither, if I knew all this, instead of regarding the god’s oracle? Because I thought, that Hera was mightier far than any oracle, and would not betray me. Waste no drink-offering on my tomb, nor spill the victim’s blood; for I will requite them for my treatment here with a journey they shall rue; and ye shall have double gain from me, for I will help you and harm them by my death. Alcmena 1026. Slay me, I do not ask thee for mercy; yet since this city let me go and shrunk from slaying me, I will reward it with an old oracle of Loxias, which in time will benefit them more than doth appear.
8. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1359-1366, 1358 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Medea, 1378-1383, 1377 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1377. Give up to me those dead, to bury and lament Medea
10. Euripides, Orestes, 1431-1436, 97-99, 114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1486-1529, 1485 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1485. I do not veil my tender cheek shaded with curls, nor do I feel shame, from maiden modesty, at the dark red beneath my eyes, the blush upon my face, as I hurry on, in bacchic revelry for the dead
12. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 755-759, 778-836, 841-843, 846-931, 934-935, 950-954, 754 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

754. Are ye bringing the bodies, for the which the strife arose? Messenger
13. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1134-1146, 1156-1206, 1240-1245, 1248-1250, 735-739, 1133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetiology Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
apate Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 291
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
audience, theatrical Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 291
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
euripides, helen Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 291
funerals Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
helen, in euripides Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 291
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
iphigenia in tauris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
logos, and truth Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 291
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
menelaus Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 291
mêchanê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
nomos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
theoklymenos Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 291
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
truth, and logos Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 291
twinning, in euripides helen Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 291
weddings' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834