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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5621
Euripides, Hecuba, 800-899


Νόμος: νόμῳ γὰρ τοὺς θεοὺς ἡγούμεθαfor by custom it is that we believe in them and set up boundaries of right and wrong for our lives. Now if this principle, when referred to you, is to be set at nothing, and they are to escape punishment who murder guests or dare to plunder the temples of gods


καὶ ζῶμεν ἄδικα καὶ δίκαι' ὡρισμένοι:for by custom it is that we believe in them and set up boundaries of right and wrong for our lives. Now if this principle, when referred to you, is to be set at nothing, and they are to escape punishment who murder guests or dare to plunder the temples of gods


ὃς ἐς ς' ἀνελθὼν εἰ διαφθαρήσεταιfor by custom it is that we believe in them and set up boundaries of right and wrong for our lives. Now if this principle, when referred to you, is to be set at nothing, and they are to escape punishment who murder guests or dare to plunder the temples of gods


καὶ μὴ δίκην δώσουσιν οἵτινες ξένουςfor by custom it is that we believe in them and set up boundaries of right and wrong for our lives. Now if this principle, when referred to you, is to be set at nothing, and they are to escape punishment who murder guests or dare to plunder the temples of gods


κτείνουσιν ἢ θεῶν ἱερὰ τολμῶσιν φέρεινfor by custom it is that we believe in them and set up boundaries of right and wrong for our lives. Now if this principle, when referred to you, is to be set at nothing, and they are to escape punishment who murder guests or dare to plunder the temples of gods


οὐκ ἔστιν οὐδὲν τῶν ἐν ἀνθρώποις ἴσον.then all fairness in human matters is at an end. Consider this then a disgrace and show regard for me, have pity on me, and, like an artist standing back from his picture, look on me and closely scan my piteous state. I was once a queen, but now I am your slave;


ταῦτ' οὖν ἐν αἰσχρῷ θέμενος αἰδέσθητί με:then all fairness in human matters is at an end. Consider this then a disgrace and show regard for me, have pity on me, and, like an artist standing back from his picture, look on me and closely scan my piteous state. I was once a queen, but now I am your slave;


οἴκτιρον ἡμᾶς, ὡς †γραφεύς† τ' ἀποσταθεὶςthen all fairness in human matters is at an end. Consider this then a disgrace and show regard for me, have pity on me, and, like an artist standing back from his picture, look on me and closely scan my piteous state. I was once a queen, but now I am your slave;


ἰδοῦ με κἀνάθρησον οἷ' ἔχω κακά.then all fairness in human matters is at an end. Consider this then a disgrace and show regard for me, have pity on me, and, like an artist standing back from his picture, look on me and closely scan my piteous state. I was once a queen, but now I am your slave;


τύραννος ἦ ποτ', ἀλλὰ νῦν δούλη σέθενthen all fairness in human matters is at an end. Consider this then a disgrace and show regard for me, have pity on me, and, like an artist standing back from his picture, look on me and closely scan my piteous state. I was once a queen, but now I am your slave;


εὔπαις ποτ' οὖσα, νῦν δὲ γραῦς ἄπαις θ' ἅμαa happy mother once, but now childless and old alike, bereft of city, utterly forlorn, the most wretched woman living.


ἄπολις ἔρημος, ἀθλιωτάτη βροτῶνa happy mother once, but now childless and old alike, bereft of city, utterly forlorn, the most wretched woman living.


οἴμοι τάλαινα, ποῖ μ' ὑπεξάγεις πόδα;as Agamemnon is turning away. Ah! woe is me! where would you withdraw your steps from me? My efforts then will be in vain, ah me! Why, oh! why do we mortals toil, as we must, and seek out all other sciences


ἔοικα πράξειν οὐδέν: ὦ τάλαιν' ἐγώ.as Agamemnon is turning away. Ah! woe is me! where would you withdraw your steps from me? My efforts then will be in vain, ah me! Why, oh! why do we mortals toil, as we must, and seek out all other sciences


τί δῆτα θνητοὶ τἄλλα μὲν μαθήματαWhy then do we mortals toil after all other sciences, as a matter of duty, and dive into them, but least of all strive to learn thoroughly Persuasion, the sole mistress o'er the minds of men, giving a price for her knowledge, that at some time we may have it in our power at once to persuade and obtain what we wish? — How then can any one hereafter hope that he shall be fortunate? So many children that I had, and now not one is left to me. But I am perishing a captive in base servitude, and yet see the smoke there leaping aloft from the city. And however this part of my argument may perchance be vain, the bringing forward love; still nevertheless it shall be urged. My daughter is wont to sleep by thy side, that prophetess, whom the Trojans call Cassandra. Where wilt thou show that thy nights were nights of love, O king, or will my daughter receive any recompense for her most fond embraces, and I through her? [For from the secret shade, and from night's joys, the greatest delight is wont to spring to mortals.] Now then attend. Thou seest this corse? Him assisting, thou wilt assist one joined to thee in affinity. One thing my speech wants yet. I would fain I had a voice in my arms, and hands, and in my hair, and in my footsteps, or by the skill of Daedalus, or some God, that each at once might hold thy knees, weeping, and imploring in all the strains of eloquence. O my lord. O greatest light of the Greeks, be persuaded; lend thy hand to avenge this aged woman, although she is of no consequence, yet avenge her. For it belongs to a good man to minister justice, and always and in every case to punish the bad.


τί δῆτα θνητοὶ τἄλλα μὲν μαθήματαas Agamemnon is turning away. Ah! woe is me! where would you withdraw your steps from me? My efforts then will be in vain, ah me! Why, oh! why do we mortals toil, as we must, and seek out all other sciences


μοχθοῦμεν ὡς χρὴ πάντα καὶ ματεύομενbut Persuasion, the only real mistress of mankind, we take no further pains to master completely by offering to pay for the knowledge, so that any man could convince his fellows as he pleased and gain his point at once?


Πειθὼ δὲ τὴν τύραννον ἀνθρώποις μόνηνbut Persuasion, the only real mistress of mankind, we take no further pains to master completely by offering to pay for the knowledge, so that any man could convince his fellows as he pleased and gain his point at once?


οὐδέν τι μᾶλλον ἐς τέλος σπουδάζομενbut Persuasion, the only real mistress of mankind, we take no further pains to master completely by offering to pay for the knowledge, so that any man could convince his fellows as he pleased and gain his point at once?


μισθοὺς διδόντες μανθάνειν, ἵν' ἦν ποτεbut Persuasion, the only real mistress of mankind, we take no further pains to master completely by offering to pay for the knowledge, so that any man could convince his fellows as he pleased and gain his point at once?


πείθειν ἅ τις βούλοιτο τυγχάνειν θ' ἅμα;but Persuasion, the only real mistress of mankind, we take no further pains to master completely by offering to pay for the knowledge, so that any man could convince his fellows as he pleased and gain his point at once?


πῶς οὖν ἔτ' ἄν τις ἐλπίσαι πράξειν καλῶς;How shall anyone hereafter hope for prosperity? All those my sons are gone from me, and she, my daughter, is a slave and suffers shame. I am lost; I see the smoke leaping over my city. Further—though this is perhaps idly urged


οἱ μὲν γὰρ ὄντες παῖδες οὐκέτ' εἰσί μοιHow shall anyone hereafter hope for prosperity? All those my sons are gone from me, and she, my daughter, is a slave and suffers shame. I am lost; I see the smoke leaping over my city. Further—though this is perhaps idly urged


αὕτη δ' ἐπ' αἰσχροῖς αἰχμάλωτος. οἴχομαι:How shall anyone hereafter hope for prosperity? All those my sons are gone from me, and she, my daughter, is a slave and suffers shame. I am lost; I see the smoke leaping over my city. Further—though this is perhaps idly urged


καπνὸν δὲ πόλεως τόνδ' ὑπερθρῴσκονθ' ὁρῶ.How shall anyone hereafter hope for prosperity? All those my sons are gone from me, and she, my daughter, is a slave and suffers shame. I am lost; I see the smoke leaping over my city. Further—though this is perhaps idly urged


καὶ μήν — ἴσως μὲν τοῦ λόγου κενὸν τόδεHow shall anyone hereafter hope for prosperity? All those my sons are gone from me, and she, my daughter, is a slave and suffers shame. I am lost; I see the smoke leaping over my city. Further—though this is perhaps idly urged


Κύπριν προβάλλειν: ἀλλ' ὅμως εἰρήσεται:to plead your love, still I will put the case—at your side lies my daughter, Cassandra, the inspired maiden, as the Phrygians call her. How then, king, will you acknowledge those nights of rapture, or what return shall my daughter or I her mother have


πρὸς σοῖσι πλευροῖς παῖς ἐμὴ κοιμίζεταιto plead your love, still I will put the case—at your side lies my daughter, Cassandra, the inspired maiden, as the Phrygians call her. How then, king, will you acknowledge those nights of rapture, or what return shall my daughter or I her mother have


ἡ φοιβάς, ἣν καλοῦσι Κασάνδραν Φρύγες.to plead your love, still I will put the case—at your side lies my daughter, Cassandra, the inspired maiden, as the Phrygians call her. How then, king, will you acknowledge those nights of rapture, or what return shall my daughter or I her mother have


ποῦ τὰς φίλας δῆτ' εὐφρόνας δείξεις, ἄναξto plead your love, still I will put the case—at your side lies my daughter, Cassandra, the inspired maiden, as the Phrygians call her. How then, king, will you acknowledge those nights of rapture, or what return shall my daughter or I her mother have


ἢ τῶν ἐν εὐνῇ φιλτάτων ἀσπασμάτωνto plead your love, still I will put the case—at your side lies my daughter, Cassandra, the inspired maiden, as the Phrygians call her. How then, king, will you acknowledge those nights of rapture, or what return shall my daughter or I her mother have


χάριν τίν' ἕξει παῖς ἐμή, κείνης δ' ἐγώ;for the love she has lavished on her lord? For from darkness and the endearments of the night mortals have their keenest joys. Listen, then; do you see this corpse? By doing him a service, you will do it to a kinsman of your bride’s.


ἐκ τοῦ σκότου τε τῶν τε νυκτερησίωνfor the love she has lavished on her lord? For from darkness and the endearments of the night mortals have their keenest joys. Listen, then; do you see this corpse? By doing him a service, you will do it to a kinsman of your bride’s.


φίλτρων μεγίστη γίγνεται βροτοῖς χάρις.for the love she has lavished on her lord? For from darkness and the endearments of the night mortals have their keenest joys. Listen, then; do you see this corpse? By doing him a service, you will do it to a kinsman of your bride’s.


ἄκουε δή νυν: τὸν θανόντα τόνδ' ὁρᾷς;for the love she has lavished on her lord? For from darkness and the endearments of the night mortals have their keenest joys. Listen, then; do you see this corpse? By doing him a service, you will do it to a kinsman of your bride’s.


τοῦτον καλῶς δρῶν ὄντα κηδεστὴν σέθενfor the love she has lavished on her lord? For from darkness and the endearments of the night mortals have their keenest joys. Listen, then; do you see this corpse? By doing him a service, you will do it to a kinsman of your bride’s.


δράσεις. ἑνός μοι μῦθος ἐνδεὴς ἔτι.I have only one thing yet to urge. Oh! would I had a voice in arms, in hands, in hair and feet, placed there by the arts of Daedalus or some god, that all together they might with tears embrace your knees


εἴ μοι γένοιτο φθόγγος ἐν βραχίοσιI have only one thing yet to urge. Oh! would I had a voice in arms, in hands, in hair and feet, placed there by the arts of Daedalus or some god, that all together they might with tears embrace your knees


καὶ χερσὶ καὶ κόμαισι καὶ ποδῶν βάσειI have only one thing yet to urge. Oh! would I had a voice in arms, in hands, in hair and feet, placed there by the arts of Daedalus or some god, that all together they might with tears embrace your knees


ἢ Δαιδάλου τέχναισιν ἢ θεῶν τινοςI have only one thing yet to urge. Oh! would I had a voice in arms, in hands, in hair and feet, placed there by the arts of Daedalus or some god, that all together they might with tears embrace your knees


ὡς πάνθ' ὁμαρτῇ σῶν ἔχοιντο γουνάτωνI have only one thing yet to urge. Oh! would I had a voice in arms, in hands, in hair and feet, placed there by the arts of Daedalus or some god, that all together they might with tears embrace your knees


κλαίοντ', ἐπισκήπτοντα παντοίους λόγους.bringing a thousand pleas to bear on you! O my lord and master, most glorious light of Hellas , listen, stretch forth a helping hand to this aged woman, for all she is a thing of nothing; still do so. For it is always a good man’s duty to help the right


ὦ δέσποτ', ὦ μέγιστον ̔́Ελλησιν φάοςbringing a thousand pleas to bear on you! O my lord and master, most glorious light of Hellas , listen, stretch forth a helping hand to this aged woman, for all she is a thing of nothing; still do so. For it is always a good man’s duty to help the right


πιθοῦ, παράσχες χεῖρα τῇ πρεσβύτιδιbringing a thousand pleas to bear on you! O my lord and master, most glorious light of Hellas , listen, stretch forth a helping hand to this aged woman, for all she is a thing of nothing; still do so. For it is always a good man’s duty to help the right


τιμωρόν, εἰ καὶ μηδέν ἐστιν, ἀλλ' ὅμως.bringing a thousand pleas to bear on you! O my lord and master, most glorious light of Hellas , listen, stretch forth a helping hand to this aged woman, for all she is a thing of nothing; still do so. For it is always a good man’s duty to help the right


ἐσθλοῦ γὰρ ἀνδρὸς τῇ δίκῃ θ' ὑπηρετεῖνbringing a thousand pleas to bear on you! O my lord and master, most glorious light of Hellas , listen, stretch forth a helping hand to this aged woman, for all she is a thing of nothing; still do so. For it is always a good man’s duty to help the right


καὶ τοὺς κακοὺς δρᾶν πανταχοῦ κακῶς ἀεί.and to punish evil-doers wherever found. Chorus Leader


δεινόν γε, θνητοῖς ὡς ἅπαντα συμπίτνειCHOR. It is strange, how every thing happens to mortals, and laws determine even the fates, making the greatest enemies friends, and enemies of those who before were on good terms. AGA. I, O Hecuba, have pity both on thee and thy son, thy misfortunes, and thy suppliant touch, and I am willing in regard both to the Gods and to justice, that this impious host should give thee full revenge, provided a way could be found, that both you might be gratified, and I might in the eyes of the army not seem to meditate this destruction against the king of Thrace for Cassandra's sake. For there is a point in which apprehension hath reached me. This man the army deems a friend, the dead an enemy; but if he is dear to thee, this is a private feeling and does not affect the army. Wherefore consider, that thou hast me willing to labor with thee, and ready to assist thee, but backward, should I be murmured against among the Greeks. HEC. Alas! no mortal is there who is free. For either he is the slave of money or of fortune; or the populace of the city or the dictates of the law constrain him to adopt manners not accordant with his natural inclinations. But since thou fearest, and payest too much regard to the multitude, I will liberate thee from this fear. For consent with me, if I meditate vengeance against the murderer of this youth, but do not act with me. But should any tumult or offer of assistance arise from out of the Greeks, when the Thracian feels the punishment he shall feel, suppress it, not appearing to do it for my sake: but of the rest be confident: I will dispose all things well. AGA. How then? What wilt thou do? Wilt thou grasp the sword in thine aged hand, and strike the barbarian? or with poison wilt thou work, or with what assistance? What hand will conspire with thee? whence wilt thou procure friends? HEC. These tents inclose a host of Trojan dames.


δεινόν γε, θνητοῖς ὡς ἅπαντα συμπίτνειIt is strange how each extreme meets in human life! Custom determines even our natural ties, making the most bitter foes friends, and regarding as foes those who formerly were friends. Agamemnon


καὶ τὰς ἀνάγκας οἱ νόμοι διώρισανIt is strange how each extreme meets in human life! Custom determines even our natural ties, making the most bitter foes friends, and regarding as foes those who formerly were friends. Agamemnon


φίλους τιθέντες τούς γε πολεμιωτάτουςIt is strange how each extreme meets in human life! Custom determines even our natural ties, making the most bitter foes friends, and regarding as foes those who formerly were friends. Agamemnon


ἐχθρούς τε τοὺς πρὶν εὐμενεῖς ποιούμενοι.It is strange how each extreme meets in human life! Custom determines even our natural ties, making the most bitter foes friends, and regarding as foes those who formerly were friends. Agamemnon


ἐγὼ σὲ καὶ σὸν παῖδα καὶ τύχας σέθενHecuba, I feel compassion for you and your son and your ill-fortune, as well as for your suppliant gesture, and I would gladly see that impious host pay you this forfeit for the sake of heaven and justice, if I could only find some way to help you


̔Εκάβη, δι' οἴκτου χεῖρά θ' ἱκεσίαν ἔχωHecuba, I feel compassion for you and your son and your ill-fortune, as well as for your suppliant gesture, and I would gladly see that impious host pay you this forfeit for the sake of heaven and justice, if I could only find some way to help you


καὶ βούλομαι θεῶν θ' οὕνεκ' ἀνόσιον ξένονHecuba, I feel compassion for you and your son and your ill-fortune, as well as for your suppliant gesture, and I would gladly see that impious host pay you this forfeit for the sake of heaven and justice, if I could only find some way to help you


καὶ τοῦ δικαίου τήνδε σοι δοῦναι δίκηνHecuba, I feel compassion for you and your son and your ill-fortune, as well as for your suppliant gesture, and I would gladly see that impious host pay you this forfeit for the sake of heaven and justice, if I could only find some way to help you


εἴ πως φανείη γ' ὥστε σοί τ' ἔχειν καλῶςHecuba, I feel compassion for you and your son and your ill-fortune, as well as for your suppliant gesture, and I would gladly see that impious host pay you this forfeit for the sake of heaven and justice, if I could only find some way to help you


στρατῷ τε μὴ δόξαιμι Κασάνδρας χάρινwithout appearing to the army to have plotted the death of the Thracian king for Cassandra’s sake. For on one point I am assailed by perplexity: the army count this man their friend, the dead their foe; that he is dear to you


Θρῄκης ἄνακτι τόνδε βουλεῦσαι φόνον.without appearing to the army to have plotted the death of the Thracian king for Cassandra’s sake. For on one point I am assailed by perplexity: the army count this man their friend, the dead their foe; that he is dear to you


ἔστιν γὰρ ᾗ ταραγμὸς ἐμπέπτωκέ μοι:without appearing to the army to have plotted the death of the Thracian king for Cassandra’s sake. For on one point I am assailed by perplexity: the army count this man their friend, the dead their foe; that he is dear to you


— Τὸν ἄνδρα τοῦτον φίλιον ἡγεῖται στρατόςwithout appearing to the army to have plotted the death of the Thracian king for Cassandra’s sake. For on one point I am assailed by perplexity: the army count this man their friend, the dead their foe; that he is dear to you


τὸν κατθανόντα δ' ἐχθρόν: εἰ δὲ σοὶ φίλοςwithout appearing to the army to have plotted the death of the Thracian king for Cassandra’s sake. For on one point I am assailed by perplexity: the army count this man their friend, the dead their foe; that he is dear to you


ὅδ' ἐστί, χωρὶς τοῦτο κοὐ κοινὸν στρατῷ. —is a matter apart, in which the army has no share. Reflect on this; for though you find me ready to share your toil and quick to lend my aid, yet the risk of being reproached by the Achaeans makes me hesitate. Hecuba


πρὸς ταῦτα φρόντιζ': ὡς θέλοντα μέν μ' ἔχειςis a matter apart, in which the army has no share. Reflect on this; for though you find me ready to share your toil and quick to lend my aid, yet the risk of being reproached by the Achaeans makes me hesitate. Hecuba


σοὶ ξυμπονῆσαι καὶ ταχὺν προσαρκέσαιis a matter apart, in which the army has no share. Reflect on this; for though you find me ready to share your toil and quick to lend my aid, yet the risk of being reproached by the Achaeans makes me hesitate. Hecuba


βραδὺν δ', ̓Αχαιοῖς εἰ διαβληθήσομαι.is a matter apart, in which the army has no share. Reflect on this; for though you find me ready to share your toil and quick to lend my aid, yet the risk of being reproached by the Achaeans makes me hesitate. Hecuba


φεῦ.Ah! there is not in the world a single man free;


οὐκ ἔστι θνητῶν ὅστις ἔστ' ἐλεύθερος:for he is a slave either to money or to fortune, or else the people in their thousands or the fear of public prosecution prevents him from following the dictates of his heart.


ἢ χρημάτων γὰρ δοῦλός ἐστιν ἢ τύχηςfor he is a slave either to money or to fortune, or else the people in their thousands or the fear of public prosecution prevents him from following the dictates of his heart.


ἢ πλῆθος αὐτὸν πόλεος ἢ νόμων γραφαὶfor he is a slave either to money or to fortune, or else the people in their thousands or the fear of public prosecution prevents him from following the dictates of his heart.


εἴργουσι χρῆσθαι μὴ κατὰ γνώμην τρόποις.for he is a slave either to money or to fortune, or else the people in their thousands or the fear of public prosecution prevents him from following the dictates of his heart.


ἐπεὶ δὲ ταρβεῖς τῷ τ' ὄχλῳ πλέον νέμειςBut since you are afraid, deferring too much to the rabble, I will rid you of that fear.


ἐγώ σε θήσω τοῦδ' ἐλεύθερον φόβου.But since you are afraid, deferring too much to the rabble, I will rid you of that fear.


σύνισθι μὲν γάρ, ἤν τι βουλεύσω κακὸνThus: be aware of my plot if I devise mischief against this murderer, but refrain from any share in it. And if any uproar or attempt at rescue breaks out among the Achaeans, when the Thracian is suffering his doom, check it without seeming to do so on my account.


τῷ τόνδ' ἀποκτείναντι, συνδράσῃς δὲ μή.Thus: be aware of my plot if I devise mischief against this murderer, but refrain from any share in it. And if any uproar or attempt at rescue breaks out among the Achaeans, when the Thracian is suffering his doom, check it without seeming to do so on my account.


ἢν δ' ἐξ ̓Αχαιῶν θόρυβος ἢ 'πικουρίαThus: be aware of my plot if I devise mischief against this murderer, but refrain from any share in it. And if any uproar or attempt at rescue breaks out among the Achaeans, when the Thracian is suffering his doom, check it without seeming to do so on my account.


πάσχοντος ἀνδρὸς Θρῃκὸς οἷα πείσεταιThus: be aware of my plot if I devise mischief against this murderer, but refrain from any share in it. And if any uproar or attempt at rescue breaks out among the Achaeans, when the Thracian is suffering his doom, check it without seeming to do so on my account.


φανῇ τις, εἶργε μὴ δοκῶν ἐμὴν χάριν.Thus: be aware of my plot if I devise mischief against this murderer, but refrain from any share in it. And if any uproar or attempt at rescue breaks out among the Achaeans, when the Thracian is suffering his doom, check it without seeming to do so on my account.


τὰ δ' ἄλλα — θάρσει — πάντ' ἐγὼ θήσω καλῶς.For what remains—take heart—I will arrange everything well. Agamemnon


πῶς οὖν; τί δράσεις; πότερα φάσγανον χερὶHow? what will you do? will you take a sword in your old hand and slay the barbarian, or do you have drugs or some means to aid you? Who will take your part? Where will you procure friends? Hecuba


λαβοῦσα γραίᾳ φῶτα βάρβαρον κτενεῖςHow? what will you do? will you take a sword in your old hand and slay the barbarian, or do you have drugs or some means to aid you? Who will take your part? Where will you procure friends? Hecuba


ἢ φαρμάκοισιν ἢ 'πικουρίᾳ τινί;How? what will you do? will you take a sword in your old hand and slay the barbarian, or do you have drugs or some means to aid you? Who will take your part? Where will you procure friends? Hecuba


τίς σοι ξυνέσται χείρ; πόθεν κτήσῃ φίλους;How? what will you do? will you take a sword in your old hand and slay the barbarian, or do you have drugs or some means to aid you? Who will take your part? Where will you procure friends? Hecuba


στέγαι κεκεύθας' αἵδε Τρῳάδων ὄχλον.Sheltered beneath these tents is a crowd of Trojan women. Agamemnon


τὰς αἰχμαλώτους εἶπας, ̔Ελλήνων ἄγραν;AGA. Meanest thou the captives, the booty of the Greeks? HEC. With these will I avenge me of my murderer. AGA. And how shall the victory over men be to women? HEC. Numbers are powerful, with stratagem invincible. AGA. Powerful, I grant; I mistrust however the race of women. HEC. And why? Did not women slay the sons of Egyptus, and utterly extirpated the race of men from Lemnos? But thus let it be. Give up this discussion. But grant this woman to pass in safety through the army. And do thou go to the Thracian host and tell him, "Hecuba, once queen of Troy, sends for you on business of no less importance to yourself than to her, and your sons likewise, since it is of consequence that your children also should hear her words." — And do thou, O Agamemnon, as yet forbear to raise the tomb over the newly-sacrificed Polyxena, that these two, the brother and the sister, the divided care of their mother, may, when reduced to ashes by one and the same flame, be interred side by side. AGA. Thus shall it be. And yet, if the army could sail, I should not have it in my power to grant thy request: but now, for the deity breathes not prosperous gales, we must wait, watching for a calm voyage. But may things turn out well some way or other: for this is a general principle among all, both individuals in private and states, That the wicked man should feel vengeance, but the good man enjoy prosperity.


τὰς αἰχμαλώτους εἶπας, ̔Ελλήνων ἄγραν;Do you mean the captives, the booty of the Hellenes? Hecuba


σὺν ταῖσδε τὸν ἐμὸν φονέα τιμωρήσομαι.With their help I will punish my murderous foe. Agamemnon


καὶ πῶς γυναιξὶν ἀρσένων ἔσται κράτος;How are women to master men? Hecuba


δεινὸν τὸ πλῆθος σὺν δόλῳ τε δύσμαχον.Numbers are a fearful thing, and joined to craft a desperate foe. Agamemnon


δεινόν: τὸ μέντοι θῆλυ μέμφομαι γένος.True; still I have a mean opinion of the female race. Hecuba


τί δ'; οὐ γυναῖκες εἷλον Αἰγύπτου τέκναWhat? did not women slay the sons of Aegyptus , and utterly clear Lemnos of men? But let it be thus; put an end to our conference, and send this woman for me safely through the army.


καὶ Λῆμνον ἄρδην ἀρσένων ἐξῴκισαν;What? did not women slay the sons of Aegyptus , and utterly clear Lemnos of men? But let it be thus; put an end to our conference, and send this woman for me safely through the army.


ἀλλ' ὣς γενέσθω: τόνδε μὲν μέθες λόγονWhat? did not women slay the sons of Aegyptus , and utterly clear Lemnos of men? But let it be thus; put an end to our conference, and send this woman for me safely through the army.


πέμψον δέ μοι τήνδ' ἀσφαλῶς διὰ στρατοῦWhat? did not women slay the sons of Aegyptus , and utterly clear Lemnos of men? But let it be thus; put an end to our conference, and send this woman for me safely through the army.


γυναῖκα. — καὶ σὺ Θρῃκὶ πλαθεῖσα ξένῳTo a servant And you are to draw near my Thracian friend and say, Hecuba, once queen of Ilium , summons you, on your own business no less than hers, your children too, for they also must hear what she has to say. The servant goes out. Defer awhile, Agamemnon


λέξον: Καλεῖ ς' ἄνασσα δή ποτ' ̓ΙλίουTo a servant And you are to draw near my Thracian friend and say, Hecuba, once queen of Ilium , summons you, on your own business no less than hers, your children too, for they also must hear what she has to say. The servant goes out. Defer awhile, Agamemnon


̔Εκάβη, σὸν οὐκ ἔλασσον ἢ κείνης χρέοςTo a servant And you are to draw near my Thracian friend and say, Hecuba, once queen of Ilium , summons you, on your own business no less than hers, your children too, for they also must hear what she has to say. The servant goes out. Defer awhile, Agamemnon


καὶ παῖδας: ὡς δεῖ καὶ τέκν' εἰδέναι λόγουςTo a servant And you are to draw near my Thracian friend and say, Hecuba, once queen of Ilium , summons you, on your own business no less than hers, your children too, for they also must hear what she has to say. The servant goes out. Defer awhile, Agamemnon


τοὺς ἐξ ἐκείνης. — τὸν δὲ τῆς νεοσφαγοῦςTo a servant And you are to draw near my Thracian friend and say, Hecuba, once queen of Ilium , summons you, on your own business no less than hers, your children too, for they also must hear what she has to say. The servant goes out. Defer awhile, Agamemnon


Πολυξένης ἐπίσχες, ̓Αγάμεμνον, τάφονthe burial of Polyxena lately slain, so that brother and sister may be laid on the same pyre and buried side by side, a double cause of sorrow to their mother. Agamemnon


ὡς τώδ' ἀδελφὼ πλησίον μιᾷ φλογίthe burial of Polyxena lately slain, so that brother and sister may be laid on the same pyre and buried side by side, a double cause of sorrow to their mother. Agamemnon


δισσὴ μέριμνα μητρί, κρυφθῆτον χθονί.the burial of Polyxena lately slain, so that brother and sister may be laid on the same pyre and buried side by side, a double cause of sorrow to their mother. Agamemnon


ἔσται τάδ' οὕτω: καὶ γὰρ εἰ μὲν ἦν στρατῷSo shall it be; yet if the army were able to sail, I could not have granted you this favor;


πλοῦς, οὐκ ἂν εἶχον τήνδε σοι δοῦναι χάριν:So shall it be; yet if the army were able to sail, I could not have granted you this favor;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 140 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

140. τόσον περ εὔφρων, καλά 140. q type=
2. Aristophanes, Knights, 31-34, 30 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

30. κράτιστα τοίνυν τῶν παρόντων ἐστὶ νῷν
3. Euripides, Andromache, 320-332, 319 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

319. ὦ δόξα δόξα, μυρίοισι δὴ βροτῶν
4. Euripides, Bacchae, 268-271, 267 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

267. καλὰς ἀφορμάς, οὐ μέγʼ ἔργον εὖ λέγειν·
5. Euripides, Electra, 583, 1043 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1043. Μενέλαον ὡς σώσαιμι; σὸς δὲ πῶς πατὴρ
6. Euripides, Hecuba, 10, 1075-1080, 11, 1114-1115, 1118-1119, 1132-1182, 1187-1199, 12, 1200-1207, 1217-1233, 1240-1251, 1255, 1260, 1267, 1270, 1292, 13-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 661, 669, 675, 684-688, 7, 708-732, 736-799, 8, 801-899, 9, 900-904, 919, 923-925, 934, 946-949, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ̔́Ηκω νεκρῶν κευθμῶνα καὶ σκότου πύλας 1. I have come from out of the charnel-house and gates of gloom, where Hades dwells apart from gods, I Polydorus, a son of Hecuba, the daughter of Cisseus, and of Priam. Now my father, when Phrygia ’s capital
7. Euripides, Helen, 1145-1146, 1144 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 194 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

194. πόλισμ', ὅθεν σὺ τούσδε, τῇ δίκῃ μὲν οὔ
9. Euripides, Hippolytus, 91 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

91. Dost know, then, the way of the world? Hippolytu
10. Euripides, Ion, 442, 20 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

20. observant of the custom of her ancestors and of earth-born Erichthonius, whom the daughter of Zeus gave into the charge of the daughters of Agraulus, after setting on either side, to keep him safe, a guard of serpents twain. Hence in that land among the Erechthidae ’tis a
11. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 794, 793 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Medea, 538, 493 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Orestes, 571, 941, 527 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Euripides, Rhesus, 639 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

639. And soft shall be my words to him I hate.
15. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1064 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1064. What dost thou say? What is this silly riddle thou propoundest? Evadne
16. Sophocles, Ajax, 1343, 1349-1350, 1129 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Sophocles, Antigone, 875, 821 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 905, 1382 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Xenophon, Memoirs, 4.4.17 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.4.17. And how is the individual citizen less likely to incur penalties from the state, and more certain to gain honour than by obeying the laws? How less likely to be defeated in the courts or more certain to win? Whom would anyone rather trust as guardian of his money or sons or daughters? Whom would the whole city think more trustworthy than the man of lawful conduct? From whom would parents or kinsfolk or servants or friends or fellow-citizens or strangers more surely get their just rights? Whom would enemies rather trust in the matter of a truce or treaty or terms of peace? Whom would men rather choose for an ally? And to whom would allies rather entrust leadership or command of a garrison, or cities? Whom would anyone more confidently expect to show gratitude for benefits received? Or whom would one rather benefit than him from whom he thinks he will receive due gratitude? Whose friendship would anyone desire, or whose enmity would he avoid more earnestly? Whom would anyone less willingly make war on than him whose friendship he covets and whose enmity he is fain to avoid, who attracts the most friends and allies, and the fewest opponents and enemies?
20. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 1.8.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.8.2. ἐγέννησε δὲ Ἀλθαία παῖδα ἐξ Οἰνέως Μελέαγρον, ὃν ἐξ Ἄρεος γεγεννῆσθαί φασι. τούτου δʼ ὄντος ἡμερῶν ἑπτὰ παραγενομένας τὰς μοίρας φασὶν εἰπεῖν, ὅτι 3 -- τότε τελευτήσει Μελέαγρος, 4 -- ὅταν ὁ καιόμενος ἐπὶ τῆς ἐσχάρας δαλὸς κατακαῇ. τοῦτο ἀκούσασα τὸν δαλὸν ἀνείλετο Ἀλθαία καὶ κατέθετο εἰς λάρνακα. Μελέαγρος δὲ ἀνὴρ ἄτρωτος καὶ γενναῖος γενόμενος τόνδε τὸν τρόπον ἐτελεύτησεν. ἐτησίων καρπῶν ἐν τῇ χώρᾳ γενομένων τὰς ἀπαρχὰς Οἰνεὺς θεοῖς πᾶσι θύων μόνης Ἀρτέμιδος ἐξελάθετο. ἡ δὲ μηνίσασα κάπρον ἐφῆκεν ἔξοχον μεγέθει τε καὶ ῥώμῃ, ὃς τήν τε γῆν ἄσπορον ἐτίθει καὶ τὰ βοσκήματα καὶ τοὺς ἐντυγχάνοντας διέφθειρεν. ἐπὶ τοῦτον τὸν κάπρον τοὺς ἀρίστους ἐκ τῆς Ἑλλάδος πάντας συνεκάλεσε, καὶ τῷ κτείναντι τὸν θῆρα τὴν δορὰν δώσειν ἀριστεῖον ἐπηγγείλατο. οἱ δὲ συνελθόντες ἐπὶ τὴν τοῦ κάπρου θήραν ἦσαν οἵδε· Μελέαγρος Οἰνέως, Δρύας 1 -- Ἄρεος, ἐκ Καλυδῶνος οὗτοι, Ἴδας καὶ Λυγκεὺς Ἀφαρέως ἐκ Μεσσήνης, Κάστωρ καὶ Πολυδεύκης Διὸς καὶ Λήδας ἐκ Λακεδαίμονος, Θησεὺς Αἰγέως ἐξ Ἀθηνῶν, Ἄδμητος Φέρητος ἐκ Φερῶν, Ἀγκαῖος καὶ Κηφεὺς Λυκούργου ἐξ Ἀρκαδίας, Ἰάσων Αἴσονος ἐξ Ἰωλκοῦ, Ἰφικλῆς Ἀμφιτρύωνος ἐκ Θηβῶν, Πειρίθους Ἰξίονος ἐκ Λαρίσης, Πηλεὺς Αἰακοῦ ἐκ Φθίας, Τελαμὼν Αἰακοῦ ἐκ Σαλαμῖνος, Εὐρυτίων Ἄκτορος ἐκ Φθίας, Ἀταλάντη Σχοινέως ἐξ Ἀρκαδίας, Ἀμφιάραος Ὀικλέους 2 -- ἐξ Ἄργους· μετὰ τούτων καὶ οἱ Θεστίου παῖδες. συνελθόντας δὲ αὐτοὺς Οἰνεὺς ἐπὶ ἐννέα ἡμέρας ἐξένισε· τῇ δεκάτῃ δὲ Κηφέως καὶ Ἀγκαίου καί τινων ἄλλων ἀπαξιούντων μετὰ γυναικὸς ἐπὶ τὴν θήραν 3 -- ἐξιέναι, Μελέαγρος ἔχων γυναῖκα Κλεοπάτραν τὴν Ἴδα καὶ Μαρπήσσης θυγατέρα, βουλόμενος δὲ καὶ ἐξ Ἀταλάντης τεκνοποιήσασθαι, συνηνάγκασεν αὐτοὺς ἐπὶ τὴν θήραν μετὰ ταύτης ἐξιέναι. περιστάντων δὲ αὐτῶν τὸν κάπρον, Ὑλεὺς 1 -- μὲν καὶ Ἀγκαῖος ὑπὸ τοῦ θηρὸς διεφθάρησαν, Εὐρυτίωνα δὲ Πηλεὺς ἄκων κατηκόντισε. τὸν δὲ κάπρον πρώτη μὲν Ἀταλάντη εἰς τὰ νῶτα ἐτόξευσε, δεύτερος δὲ Ἀμφιάραος εἰς τὸν ὀφθαλμόν· Μελέαγρος δὲ αὐτὸν εἰς τὸν κενεῶνα πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ λαβὼν τὸ δέρας ἔδωκεν Ἀταλάντῃ. οἱ δὲ Θεστίου παῖδες, ἀδοξοῦντες εἰ παρόντων ἀνδρῶν γυνὴ τὰ ἀριστεῖα λήψεται, τὸ δέρας αὐτῆς 2 -- ἀφείλοντο, κατὰ γένος αὑτοῖς προσήκειν λέγοντες, εἰ Μελέαγρος λαμβάνειν μὴ προαιροῖτο.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acknowledge (= believe in) Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 558
agamemnon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
anapaests Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
antiphon, anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
aphrodite Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
atheism Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 558
audience Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
belief, believe, lack of Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 558
cassandra Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
charis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 173
chorus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
cognitive approach to (greek) religion' Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 558
dale, a. m. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
deception, and tragedy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
deception, association with rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
doxa (seeming, opinion, reputation) Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
eidôla, as prologues Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eidôla, in tragedy Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eidôla Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
ekphrasis Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
euripides, andromache, doxa in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
euripides, andromache Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
euripides, eidôla Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
euripides, gorgianic elements in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
euripides, hecuba Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
euripides, hecubas rhetoric in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
euripides, on (im)materiality of lies Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
euripides, on doxa and deception Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
euripides, on lie-detection Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
euripides, on rhetoric of anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
euripides, on spartans Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
euripides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
family Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
gorgias, and euripides Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
gorgias, encomium of helen Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
gorgias, his definition of doxa Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
gorgias, role within fifth-century enlightenment Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
gorgias, theory of apate Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
greek tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
hecuba Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4, 26; Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 173
hopelessness, and loss of faith in the gods Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
isonomia Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 173
knees Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
law, unwritten laws Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
law Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
logos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
lyricism Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
materiality, in euripides, of discourse Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
materiality, in euripides Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
melos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
menelaus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
nomos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4; Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
obligations Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
oratory Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
pathos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
peitho Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
performance Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4, 26
persuasion Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4; Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
persuasion ( peitho ) Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
polydoros Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
polymestor Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4; Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
punishment Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
revenge, hopelessness feeding a passion for revenge Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
rhetoric, of anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 283
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4, 26
rohde, e. Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
self–presentation Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
solon Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 558
sophocles, antigone. Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 391
speaker Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
spectators Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
supplication Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
tragedy, and law Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 391
tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4; Pamias, Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads (2017) 83
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4, 26
tzanetou, a. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 173
with Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 132
women Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
xenoktonia Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 173