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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5621
Euripides, Hecuba, 736-799


δύστην', ἐμαυτὴν γὰρ λέγω λέγουσα σέUnhappy one! in naming you I name myself; Hecuba, what shall I do? throw myself here at Agamemnon’s knees, or bear my sorrows in silence? Agamemnon


̔Εκάβη, τί δράσω; πότερα προσπέσω γόνυUnhappy one! in naming you I name myself; Hecuba, what shall I do? throw myself here at Agamemnon’s knees, or bear my sorrows in silence? Agamemnon


̓Αγαμέμνονος τοῦδ' ἢ φέρω σιγῇ κακά;Unhappy one! in naming you I name myself; Hecuba, what shall I do? throw myself here at Agamemnon’s knees, or bear my sorrows in silence? Agamemnon


τί μοι προσώπῳ νῶτον ἐγκλίνασα σὸνWhy do you turn your back towards me and


δύρῃ, τὸ πραχθὲν δ' οὐ λέγεις; — τίς ἔσθ' ὅδε;weep, refusing to say what has happened? Who is this? Hecuba aside


ἀλλ', εἴ με δούλην πολεμίαν θ' ἡγούμενοςHEC. (aside) But should he, thinking me a slave, an enemy, spurn me from his knees, I should be adding to my present sufferings. AGA. No prophet I, so as to trace, unless by hearing, the path of thy counsels. HEC. (aside) Am I not rather then putting an evil construction on this man's thoughts, whereas he has no evil intention toward me? AGA. If thou art willing that I should nothing of this affair, thou art of a mind with me, for neither do I wish to hear. HEC. (aside) I can not without him take vengeance for my children. Why do I thus hesitate? I must be bold, whether I succeed, or fail. Agamemnon, by these knees, and by thy beard I implore thee, and by thy blessed hand — AGA. What thy request? Is it to pass thy life in freedom? for this is easy for thee to obtain. HEC. Not this indeed; but so that I avenge myself on the bad, I am willing to pass my whole life in slavery. AGA. And for what assistance dost thou call on me? HEC. In none of those things which thou imaginest, O king. Seest thou this corse, o'er which I drop the tear? AGA. I see it; thy meaning however I can not learn from this.


ἀλλ', εἴ με δούλην πολεμίαν θ' ἡγούμενοςBut if he should count me as a slave and foe and spurn me from his knees, I would add to my anguish. Agamemnon


γονάτων ἀπώσαιτ', ἄλγος ἂν προσθείμεθ' ἄν.But if he should count me as a slave and foe and spurn me from his knees, I would add to my anguish. Agamemnon


οὔτοι πέφυκα μάντις, ὥστε μὴ κλύωνI am no prophet born; therefore, if I am not told, I cannot learn the current of your thoughts. Hecuba aside


ἐξιστορῆσαι σῶν ὁδὸν βουλευμάτων.I am no prophet born; therefore, if I am not told, I cannot learn the current of your thoughts. Hecuba aside


ἆρ' ἐκλογίζομαί γε πρὸς τὸ δυσμενὲςCan it be that in estimating this man’s feelings I make him out too ill-disposed, when he is not really so? Agamemnon


μᾶλλον φρένας τοῦδ', ὄντος οὐχὶ δυσμενοῦς;Can it be that in estimating this man’s feelings I make him out too ill-disposed, when he is not really so? Agamemnon


εἴ τοί με βούλῃ τῶνδε μηδὲν εἰδέναιIf your wish really is that I should remain in ignorance, we are of one mind; for I have no wish myself to listen. Hecuba aside


ἐς ταὐτὸν ἥκεις: καὶ γὰρ οὐδ' ἐγὼ κλύειν.If your wish really is that I should remain in ignorance, we are of one mind; for I have no wish myself to listen. Hecuba aside


οὐκ ἂν δυναίμην τοῦδε τιμωρεῖν ἄτερWithout his aid I shall not be able to avenge


τέκνοισι τοῖς ἐμοῖσι. τί στρέφω τάδε;my children. Why do I still ponder the matter? I must do and dare whether I win or lose. Turning to Agamemnon Agamemnon, by your knees, by your beard and conquering hand I implore you— Agamemnon


τολμᾶν ἀνάγκη, κἂν τύχω κἂν μὴ τύχω. —my children. Why do I still ponder the matter? I must do and dare whether I win or lose. Turning to Agamemnon Agamemnon, by your knees, by your beard and conquering hand I implore you— Agamemnon


̓Αγάμεμνον, ἱκετεύω σε τῶνδε γουνάτωνmy children. Why do I still ponder the matter? I must do and dare whether I win or lose. Turning to Agamemnon Agamemnon, by your knees, by your beard and conquering hand I implore you— Agamemnon


καὶ σοῦ γενείου δεξιᾶς τ' εὐδαίμονοςmy children. Why do I still ponder the matter? I must do and dare whether I win or lose. Turning to Agamemnon Agamemnon, by your knees, by your beard and conquering hand I implore you— Agamemnon


τί χρῆμα μαστεύουσα; μῶν ἐλεύθερονWhat is your desire? to be


αἰῶνα θέσθαι; ῥᾴδιον γάρ ἐστί σοι.et free? that is easily done. Hecuba


οὐ δῆτα: τοὺς κακοὺς δὲ τιμωρουμένηNot that; give me vengeance on the wicked, and I am willing to lead a life of slavery forever. Agamemnon


αἰῶνα τὸν σύμπαντα δουλεύειν θέλω.Not that; give me vengeance on the wicked, and I am willing to lead a life of slavery forever. Agamemnon


καὶ δὴ τίν' ἡμᾶς εἰς ἐπάρκεσιν καλεῖς;Well, but why do you call me to your aid? Hecuba


οὐδέν τι τούτων ὧν σὺ δοξάζεις, ἄναξ. —It is a matter you little know of, king.


ὁρᾷς νεκρὸν τόνδ', οὗ καταστάζω δάκρυ;Do you see this corpse, for whom my tears now flow? Agamemnon


ὁρῶ: τὸ μέντοι μέλλον οὐκ ἔχω μαθεῖν.I do; but what is to follow, I cannot guess. Hecuba


τοῦτόν ποτ' ἔτεκον κἄφερον ζώνης ὕπο.HEC. Him did I once bring forth, him bore I in my bosom. AGA. Is this indeed one of thy children, O unhappy woman? HEC. It is, but not of the sons of Priam who fell under the walls of Troy. AGA. Didst thou then bear any other besides those, O lady? HEC. In vain, as it appears, this whom you see. AGA. But where did he chance to be, when the city fell? HEC. His father sent him out of the country, dreading his death. AGA. Whither, having removed him alone of his children then alive? HEC. To this country, where he was found a corse. AGA. To him who is king over this state, to Polymestor?


τοῦτόν ποτ' ἔτεκον κἄφερον ζώνης ὕπο.He was once my child; I bore him in my womb. Agamemnon


ἔστιν δὲ τίς σῶν οὗτος, ὦ τλῆμον, τέκνων;Which of your sons is he, poor sufferer? Hecuba


οὐ τῶν θανόντων Πριαμιδῶν ὑπ' ̓Ιλίῳ.Not one of Priam’s race who fell beneath Ilium ’s walls. Agamemnon


ἦ γάρ τιν' ἄλλον ἔτεκες ἢ κείνους, γύναι;Did you indeed have another son besides those, lady? Hecuba


ἀνόνητά γ', ὡς ἔοικε, τόνδ' ὃν εἰσορᾷς.Yes, the one you see here, of whom it seems I have small gain. Agamemnon


ποῦ δ' ὢν ἐτύγχαν', ἡνίκ' ὤλλυτο πτόλις;Where then was he, when his city was being destroyed? Hecuba


πατήρ νιν ἐξέπεμψεν ὀρρωδῶν θανεῖν.His father, fearful of his death, conveyed him out of Troy . Agamemnon


ποῖ τῶν τότ' ὄντων χωρίσας τέκνων μόνον;Where did he place him apart from the sons he then had? Hecuba


ἐς τήνδε χώραν, οὗπερ ηὑρέθη θανών.In this very land, where his corpse was found. Agamemnon


πρὸς ἄνδρ' ὃς ἄρχει τῆσδε Πολυμήστωρ χθονός;HEC. Hither was he sent, the guardian of gold, which proved most destructive to him. AGA. By whose hand then he is dead, and having met with what fate? HEC. By whom else should he? The Thracian host slew him. AGA. O wretch! was he so inflamed with the desire of obtaining the gold? HEC. Even so, after he had heard of Troy's disasters. AGA. And where didst thou find him, or who brought the body? HEC. She, meeting with it on the sea-shore. AGA. In quest of it, or occupied in some other employment? HEC. She was going to bring from the sea wherewith to bathe Polyxena. AGA. This friend then, as it seems, murdered him, and after that cast him out. HEC. To toss upon the waves thus gashing his body. AGA. O thou unhappy from thy unmeasured ills! HEC. I perish, no woe is left, O Agamemnon. AGA. Alas! alas! What woman was ever so unfortunate?


πρὸς ἄνδρ' ὃς ἄρχει τῆσδε Πολυμήστωρ χθονός;With Polymestor, the king of this country? Hecuba


ἐνταῦθ' ἐπέμφθη πικροτάτου χρυσοῦ φύλαξ.He was sent here in charge of gold, most bitter trust! Agamemnon


θνῄσκει δὲ πρὸς τοῦ καὶ τίνος πότμου τυχών;By whom was he slain? What death overtook him? Hecuba


τίνος γ' ὑπ' ἄλλου; Θρῄξ νιν ὤλεσε ξένος.By whom but this man? His Thracian host slew him. Agamemnon


ὦ τλῆμον: ἦ που χρυσὸν ἠράσθη λαβεῖν;The wretch! could he have been so eager for the gold? Hecuba


τοιαῦτ', ἐπειδὴ συμφορὰν ἔγνω Φρυγῶν.Just so, when he heard of the Phrygians’ disaster. Agamemnon


ηὗρες δὲ ποῦ νιν; ἢ τίς ἤνεγκεν νεκρόν;Where did you find him? or did some one bring his corpse? Hecuba


ἥδ', ἐντυχοῦσα ποντίας ἀκτῆς ἔπι.This woman, who happened upon it on the sea-shore. Agamemnon


τοῦτον ματεύους' ἢ πονοῦς' ἄλλον πόνον;Was she seeking it, or bent on other tasks? Hecuba


λούτρ' ᾤχετ' οἴσους' ἐξ ἁλὸς Πολυξένῃ.She had gone to fetch water from the sea to wash Polyxena. Agamemnon


κτανών νιν, ὡς ἔοικεν, ἐκβάλλει ξένος.It seems then his host slew him and cast his body out to sea. Hecuba


θαλασσόπλαγκτόν γ', ὧδε διατεμὼν χρόα.Yes, for the waves to toss, after mangling him in this way. Agamemnon


ὦ σχετλία σὺ τῶν ἀμετρήτων πόνων.Woe to you for your measureless troubles! Hecuba


ὄλωλα κοὐδὲν λοιπόν, ̓Αγάμεμνον, κακῶν.I am ruined; no evil now is left, Agamemnon. Agamemnon


φεῦ φεῦ: τίς οὕτω δυστυχὴς ἔφυ γυνή;Ah! what woman was ever born to such mischance? Hecuba


οὐκ ἔστιν, εἰ μὴ τὴν Τύχην αὐτὴν λέγοις.HEC. There is none, except you reckon Misfortune herself. But for what cause I fall at thy knees, now hear: if I appear to you to suffer these ills justly, I would be reconciled to them; but if otherwise, be thou my avenger on this man, this most impious of false friends; who revering neither the Gods beneath the earth, nor the Gods above, hath done this most unholy deed, having often partaken of the same table with me, [and in the list of hospitality the first of my friends; and having met with whatever was due, and having received a full consideration for his services, ] slew him, and deigned not to give him a tomb, which he might have given, although he purposed to slay him, but cast him forth at the mercy of the waves. We indeed are slaves, and perhaps weak; but the Gods are strong, and strong the law, which governs them; for by the law we judge that there are Gods, and we live having justice and injustice strictly defined; which if when referred to thee it be disregarded, and they shall suffer no punishment who slay their guests, or dare to pollute the hallowed statutes of the Gods, there is nothing equitable in the dealings of men. Beholding these things then in a base and proper light, reverence me; pity me, and, as the artist stands aside to view a picture, do thou view my living portrait, and see what woes I am enduring. Once was I a queen, but now I am thy slave; once was I blest in my children, but now aged, and at the same time childless, cityless, destitute, the most miserable of mortals. Alas me wretched! whither withdrawest from me thy foot? It seems I shall make no impression, wretch that I am.


οὐκ ἔστιν, εἰ μὴ τὴν Τύχην αὐτὴν λέγοις.There is no one, unless you would name Chance herself. But hear my reason for throwing myself at your knees. If my treatment seems to you deserved, I will be content; but, if otherwise, help me to punish


ἀλλ' ὧνπερ οὕνεκ' ἀμφὶ σὸν πίπτω γόνυThere is no one, unless you would name Chance herself. But hear my reason for throwing myself at your knees. If my treatment seems to you deserved, I will be content; but, if otherwise, help me to punish


ἄκουσον. εἰ μὲν ὅσιά σοι παθεῖν δοκῶThere is no one, unless you would name Chance herself. But hear my reason for throwing myself at your knees. If my treatment seems to you deserved, I will be content; but, if otherwise, help me to punish


στέργοιμ' ἄν: εἰ δὲ τοὔμπαλιν, σύ μοι γενοῦThere is no one, unless you would name Chance herself. But hear my reason for throwing myself at your knees. If my treatment seems to you deserved, I will be content; but, if otherwise, help me to punish


τιμωρὸς ἀνδρός, ἀνοσιωτάτου ξένουthis most godless host, fearless alike of gods in heaven or hell, who has done a most unholy deed; who, though often he had shared my board and been counted first of all my guest-friend


ὃς οὔτε τοὺς γῆς νέρθεν οὔτε τοὺς ἄνωthis most godless host, fearless alike of gods in heaven or hell, who has done a most unholy deed; who, though often he had shared my board and been counted first of all my guest-friend


δείσας δέδρακεν ἔργον ἀνοσιώτατονthis most godless host, fearless alike of gods in heaven or hell, who has done a most unholy deed; who, though often he had shared my board and been counted first of all my guest-friend


κοινῆς τραπέζης πολλάκις τυχὼν ἐμοίthis most godless host, fearless alike of gods in heaven or hell, who has done a most unholy deed; who, though often he had shared my board and been counted first of all my guest-friend


ξενίας τ' ἀριθμῷ πρῶτ' ἔχων ἐμῶν φίλωνthis most godless host, fearless alike of gods in heaven or hell, who has done a most unholy deed; who, though often he had shared my board and been counted first of all my guest-friend


τυχὼν δ' ὅσων δεῖ — . καὶ λαβὼν προμηθίανmeeting with every kindness he could claim—. And receiving my consideration, he slew my son, and bent though he was on murder, did not think it right to bury him, but cast his body forth to sea.


ἔκτεινε: τύμβου δ', εἰ κτανεῖν ἐβούλετοmeeting with every kindness he could claim—. And receiving my consideration, he slew my son, and bent though he was on murder, did not think it right to bury him, but cast his body forth to sea.


οὐκ ἠξίωσεν, ἀλλ' ἀφῆκε πόντιον.meeting with every kindness he could claim—. And receiving my consideration, he slew my son, and bent though he was on murder, did not think it right to bury him, but cast his body forth to sea.


ἡμεῖς μὲν οὖν δοῦλοί τε κἀσθενεῖς ἴσως:I may be a slave and weak as well, but the gods are strong, and Custom too which prevails over them


ἀλλ' οἱ θεοὶ σθένουσι χὡ κείνων κρατῶνI may be a slave and weak as well, but the gods are strong, and Custom too which prevails over them


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Euripides, Hecuba, 10, 1075-1080, 11, 1114-1115, 1118-1119, 1132-1182, 1187-1199, 12, 1200-1207, 1217-1233, 1240-1251, 1255, 1260, 1267, 1270, 1292, 13-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-34, 345, 35-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 661, 669, 675, 684-688, 7, 708-732, 737-799, 8, 800-899, 9, 900-904, 919, 923-925, 934, 946-949, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ̔́Ηκω νεκρῶν κευθμῶνα καὶ σκότου πύλας 1. I have come from out of the charnel-house and gates of gloom, where Hades dwells apart from gods, I Polydorus, a son of Hecuba, the daughter of Cisseus, and of Priam. Now my father, when Phrygia ’s capital
2. Euripides, Medea, 440, 731-758, 439 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

439. Gone is the grace that oaths once had. Through all the breadth
3. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1184-1212, 1183 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1183. Hearken, Theseus, to the words that I Athena utter, telling thee thy duty, which, if thou perform it, will serve thy city.
4. Euripides, Trojan Women, 101-104, 1044-1045, 105-153, 155-160, 176-181, 191, 98-100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. no longer am I queen in Ilium . Though fortune change, endure your lot; sail with the stream, and follow fortune’s tack, do not steer your ship of life against the tide, since chance must guide your course.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agamemnon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
anapaests Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 22, 26
aphrodite Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
apollo Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
athena Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
audience Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 5, 26
characterization Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 5
chorus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 22, 26
collard, c. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 22
curses Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
dale, a. m. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
diegesis Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 5
distichomythia Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 5
drama Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 29
eidôla, as prologues Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eidôla, in tragedy Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eidôla Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
ekphrasis Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
euripides, eidôla Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
euripides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
family Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
greek tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
hecuba Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4, 5, 22, 26, 29
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 172
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
hopelessness, and loss of faith in the gods Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
logos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
lyricism Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
mastronarde, d. j. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 5
melos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
metabole Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 22
murder Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 5
nomos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
oaths Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
oratory Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
past Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 22
pathos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
peitho Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
performance Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4, 26
persuasion Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
polymestor Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
poseidon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 22
priam Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 22
prothesis Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 5
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
revenge, hopelessness feeding a passion for revenge Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4, 5, 26, 29
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
rohde, e. Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
self–presentation Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
speaker Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4, 22
spectators Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 26
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
supplication Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
tragedy' Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4
tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 22
trojan women Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 4, 22, 26
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 828
troy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 22
tzanetou, a. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 172
women Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57